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A Unique Approach for Responding to Negative Yelp Reviews

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Appliance Repair Service, Samurai Incarnate 16 December 2014 · 961 views
Yelp
Recently, someone posted a bogus, malicious review about our appliance service business on Yelp. We had never worked for the reviewer nor had a service call that went anything like what he described. We think it may have been posted by a competitor. But this doesn't stop Yelp from posting it or allowing it to remain.

There are two ways to deal with such reviews on Yelp, both of which are focused on perception damage control and so are written with the potential customer in mind. But they are very different strategies:

1. The Serious Business Approach: This is a direct approach where you politely explain that, although you don't know who the reviewer is, that you would be happy to refund all his money if he contacts you with his real name. Then go on to showcase how your business works. This is the approach that 99.9% of service companies take.

2. The Surreal Approach: This strategy employs the principle of Judo where your opponent's own force is used against him. In the context of dealing with a fake review, the idea is to extend the reader's experience of reading a bogus review into the surreal and, in so doing, lampoon the bogus review. It's the proven technique of illustrating absurdity by being absurd. Again, this approach is not for a typical negative review by an actual customer. This is for over-the-top, fictional reviews by people who weren't even your customer.

And for most service companies, the first approach is probably the best strategy. However, if you have access to a creative writer (you can hire my son, Stephen), you can take the second approach.

Here's the reply we posted to our 1-star "review" on Yelp:

Why bother to tell a tale, William E., if you are going to leave out all the best parts? Come, gentle reader, let me tell you the rest of the story.

Things admittedly got off to a rough start when I walked into his house and stepped on his dog and dropped my toolbag on the cat. I then tried to diffuse the situation by paying a compliment to his grandfather, who tearfully explained that she was his wife. When Mr. E started to complain about all of this, I interrupted him by loudly imitating goat noises. I do this periodically to connect with my totem animal. It’s a spiritual thing.

Mr. E showed me to the oven and left to comfort his wife. I then felt the call from The Beyond and began to meditate. I was carried off to the seventh Heavenly Realm where Fixituru no Dotukami, the Great Samurai Repairman in the Sky, dwells. There, we drank sake and had our back hair braided by cherubs. I then started up the path of total appliantological nirvana, but was rudely brought back to earth by the voice of Mr. E asking what the *bleep* I was doing. This is why I appeared angry to him: never interrupt a man who is hallucinating vividly.

After skillfully applying duct tape to the oven and making a random guess at what the problem was, I went to pull up the repair cost on my tablet, when I realized I'd mistaken a piece of cardboard for my iPad. Again. Punching the cardboard with my fingers and making beeping noises, I made up a price on the spot using my keen, appliantological wit.

After he told me “no way,” I quickly hid the piece of paper Mr. E thought the part numbers were written on because I didn’t want him to see the sacred doodles of divination scrawled on it. They are not for the eyes of the uninitiated.

We here at The Appliance Guru are sorry that, as Mr. and Mrs. E stood in their doorway and watched me soar away on my magical, flying toilet, wishing one and all a merry Kwanza and sprinkling enchanted pixie dust across the land, they were not thrilled by my services. If it pleases Mr. E, I can return to his home to perform ritual suicide—perhaps the sight of my steaming entrails spilled on his kitchen floor will be enough to repair any ill-will.

We thank you for using our business. Have a nice day.





Master Appliance Repair at the Samurai Tech Academy

learn appliance repair and 3 more...
Things are hopping at the Samurai Tech Academy as we now have a steady stream of students, and quite a few enthusiastic graduates already. Here's a new presentation video for the Samurai Tech Academy that we created for the Sample Course page at the Academy site to introduce the course to prospective students. My two sons, Stephen and Sam, put together the presentation and wrote the script and I'm the big-mouth talking it through. Check it out!



This Christmas, give the gift of learning to someone you love. Whether they're making a mid-life career change, a young person looking for an interesting and lucrative career, or an already experienced appliance tech wanting to back-fill their knowledge gaps and up their game, the courses at the Samurai Tech Academy can get them where they want to go.

If you have any questions about the Samurai Tech Academy that aren’t answered on our FAQ page, just contact us by phone or email.

Read about our current offerings of online appliance repair courses. Then take our sample course to get a feel for what it’s like to learn appliance repair online at the Samurai Tech Academy. Finally, enroll in the course or courses of your choice.

The Samurai Tech Academy
Learn more. Earn more.
MasterSamuraiTech.com


What's wrong with this dryer outlet?

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Dryer Repair 13 December 2014 · 789 views
dryer, outlet, receptacle and 1 more...
What specific problem do you think this outlet was causing with the dryer and why? When you're ready for the answer, click here.

Posted Image


What's wrong with this picture?

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Icemaker Repair, Refrigerator Repair 09 December 2014 · 1,122 views
refrigerator, icemaker and 2 more...
Posted Image


This is a picture from a recent service call I did. That white/translucent plastic tubing you see coming out of the floor and connecting to the gray PEX tubing on the refrigerator is a big No-No. That's a flood waiting to happen. Think about it: that plastic tubing us under household water pressure 24/7-- that's 40 to 60 psi. Combine that with with the fact that it gets hot behind a refrigerator that's pushed back against the wall, especially in summer.

Heat... plastic... brittle... cracked or burst plastic tubing.

And what's to stop the water from spraying out at household pressure when (not if) that plastic tubing breaks? Ain't but one thing: your hand on the shut off valve to stop the water flow.

What if you can't find the shut off valve to stop the water flow because the plumber installed it in a weird location or the house has been renovated since the water line was installed and the valve is inaccessible?

What if you can't reach the shut off valve because it's up behind a drop ceiling and you can't find the ladder during the panic to stop the water?

What happens if you're not home when that cheap plastic tubing bursts, as it inevitably will given enough heat and time?

You get the idea. So how do you avoid all this unpleasantness? Any water supply line or tubing in your house that's under continuous household pressure should only be one of three things: copper, steel-braided flex line, or PEX.

Now, if the plastic water tubing were AFTER the refrigerator's water inlet valve, as is commonly the case with older refrigerators, not such a big deal because 1) the tubing is not under continuous pressure; it’s only under pressure when the solenoid valve opens which 2) only occurs for several seconds every couple of hours or so for the ice maker or on-demand for the water dispenser.

Moral of the story: plastic and household plumbing don't mix.






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"If I can't help you fix your appliance and make you 100% satisfied, I will come to your home and slice open my belly,
spilling my steaming entrails onto your floor."


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