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Secret Repair Kata for Fixing a Leaky Door in an LG Washer

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Washing Machine Repair 29 November 2012 · 962 views
LG, washer, leak
Academy Fellow john63 shares with us his super secret kata for fixing a leaky door in an LG front loading washer:

<<<leaks from the bottom of the door and down the front outside of the machine>>>

************************

Remove the Door Gasket Clamp.

Peel back the Door Gasket at/next to the Door Lock Assy.

Remove the stainless steel screws---from the.Door Lock Assy and press/push the Door Lock Assy out.

Re-install both stainless steel screws (but do not re-attach the Lock)

Add one flat washer (preferably stainless steel) to each screw.

Take the Door Lock Assy and bring it up to the 2 screws----re-install.

The flat washers will cause/make the Door Lock Assy to move inward towards the tub---and when the Locking Cam pulls the door to it's *locked* position---provides a tighter seal.

Greater than 90% of the time---this resolves the leak. If not---a new DOOR GASKET will be needed.

This type of leak---usually occurs on older LG washers that do NOT have the True Balance Feature---and is on a *wood* floor (shakes during spin cycle).

Clean the door at the 6 o'clock position---remove debris (hair/lint) that can accumulate at the bottom of the glass "bubble".


And Academy Fellow Willie shares a door leak fix with general application to all front loaders:

The cleaning of the hair build-up at the 6 o'clock position on the door glass and gasket is very important.

In the last couple months I've had two front loaders with this exact problem and it was just a case of a small bit of hair on the glass that makes a wick to let water dribble out during the complete cycle, (one was a Frigidaire and the other was a Whirlpool Duet).


Source: LG front loader washer...weepy door gasket


Appliantology Newsletter: Keep Your Furnace Firing This Winter

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Appliantology Newsletter 15 November 2012 · 850 views
appliantology, newsletter
Appliantology Newsletter
Keep Your Furnace Firing This Winter
November 15, 2012
Presents Another Award-Winning Issue of...
As the temperatures drop, folks all around the country are firing up their furnaces to keep out the cold. This issue of Appliantology offers you some tips for keeping your furnace running at peak efficiency and some resources for repair help and parts in case your furnace breaks.
Replace Your Furnace Filter Now
This is the single most important and easiest thing you can do to keep your furnace running right.


One of the biggest complaints with forced hot air furnaces is that air inside the house can become laden with dust mites and micro allergens from the recirculated air. You can cut way down on these allergens and breathe easier if you replace your furnace filter with a high-efficiency, micro allergen reduction filter. More on that later. First, here are...
Three Reasons to Change your Furnace Air Filter Regularly
1. Prolong the life of your furnace.


Air filters prolong the life of your furnace by keeping harmful particles out of the blower motor and heat exchanger. The blower motor can burn out if not kept clean and costs more than $200 to replace. Additionally, by not changing your filters every month, you can do the same damage to your unit’s motor by restricting the airflow needed to prevent the motor from being overworked. Considering the potential costs of repairs, filters are very inexpensive.


2. Cut down on your energy cost.


The second reason for changing your air filters regularly is to cut down on your energy cost. A dirty air filter can increase your energy cost by 35% by causing the furnace to work harder and run longer to maintain the desired temperature.


3. Promote better air quality in your home.


The third reason to change your air filters regularly and upgrade to a higher-grade filter is that it promotes better air quality in your home. Replacing your filter on a regular basis will cut down on airborne particles that can aggravate allergies and carry viruses.


It's important to note that all filters are not created equal and there are several different types of filters to chose from. How do you chose the right one for you? I'm glad you asked…
Types of Furnace Air Filters – How to Choose One Right For You
Typically, air filters are rated by the size of the particles they can remove. Most good furnace filters can easily remove particles larger than 10 microns in size, but the best filters are able to remove particles smaller than 3 microns. One micron is one millionth of a meter or approximately 1/25,000 of an inch. For comparison, a human hair is about 70 microns thick.


Most pleated filters have a performance rating that is assigned a number to indicate the level of effectiveness. Generally the higher this number is, the higher the performance of the filter.


Different manufacturers use different performance ratings but 3M's MPR rating is emerging as the industry standard. MPR stands for Micro-particle Performance Rating. The 3M MPR rating focuses on the smallest and most troublesome particles - those between 0.3 and 1.0 Microns in size. Generally speaking, a filter with an MPR of 1000 is twice as effective at removing those tiny particles as a filter with a 500 MPR.


The flat panel fiberglass filter, such as this one, is the lowest cost filter available under $1.50 retail each. This is the least effective filter in terms of particle filtration, but is good for protecting equipment if changed regularly. Flat panel filters are designed to catch only larger particles, allowing smaller particles to pass through. Flat panel filters have no performance rating due to their low efficiency. The recommendation is to replace flat panel filters every 30 days.


The second type of filter is the basic pleated filter like this 3M 300 Dust Reducing filter. Compared to flat panel filters, the pleated filter is 5 times more effective in catching the airborne particles than flat panel filters allow to pass through. The retail for a basic pleated filter is under $5.00 each. Because they catch smaller particles, they are more efficient than fiberglass filters. They reduce energy costs by keeping your unit cleaner, as well as keeping your air quality at a higher standard. Basic pleated filters, based on testing of residential systems, need to be replaced every 30 days. The MPR rating on basic pleated filters ranges from 300 to 500.


The best type of filter we will discuss is the electrostatic pleated filter like this 3M 600 Dust and Pollen reducing filter or this 3M 1000 Micro Allergen filter all the way up to 3M's top-of-the-line 2200 Elite Allergen Reduction filter.


Electrostatic filters have media that is charged with electric current during the manufacturing process, allowing the filter to attract smaller particles; much like a magnet attracts metal. 3M electrostatic filters have both positive & negative charges to attract dust no matter which charge it holds. Electrostatic filters are up to 18 times more effective than flat panel filters and have MPR rating of 600 to 2200. The average retail on this type of filter is from $7.86 to $ 10.96 each. These filters are designed to be replaced every 90 days. Considering the lifespan of these electrostatic filters, they not only do a better job of cleaning the air in your home but the cost less on a monthly basis because they don’t have to be changed as often.
Broken Furnace? Get Repair Help!
If your furnace does stop running or isn't running right, come get interactive repair help in the HVAC Forum at the Appliantology Academy.


Our friends at RepairClinic.com, the premiere online source for appliance parts, now offer furnace parts for Carrier, Lennox, and York with the same awesome, hassle-free one-year return policy that they offer on appliance parts! To shop for furnace parts, click here.


For your convenience, here are direct links to the three most common types of furnace parts that you'll need to replace:


1. Furnace Circuit Boards


2. Furnace Limit Thermostats



Samurai Appliance Repair Man, www.Appliantology.org



Replacing the Door Springs in a Frigidaire Dishwasher

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Dishwasher Repair 10 November 2012 · 1,570 views
frigidaire, dishwasher, door and 1 more...
Posted Image

Grand Master Funk kdog calls the dance steps on this little ditty:

You should replace the pair, you need to order 2

unscrew the 2 flange brackets securing the d/w to cabinet, remove the toe kick and slide the d/w out a way - you'll see the springs/hinges on the side, pretty self explanatory when you see them. Hopefully the water line is flexible enough to allow it to slide out a bit. If it is plumbed to steel or copper line and is fixed, unscrew the valve from the frame so that it can stay put. DO NOT disconnect water line as you could be asking for trouble. If your hands are nimble enough, you might be able to install them from underneath by removing only the toekick.


Part link to the door springs ==> http://www.repaircli...mber=FDB989GFC2


Source: frigidaire dishwasher FDB989GFC2 springs


Appliantology Newsletter: Keep Your Oven Cooking for Thanksgiving

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Appliantology Newsletter, Oven-Range-Stove Repair 02 November 2012 · 1,335 views
newsletter
Appliantology Newsletter
Keep Your Oven Cooking for Thanksgiving
November 1, 2012
Presents
Running Your Oven's Self-Clean Could Mean Cold Turkey on Thanksgiving Day
Professional Appliantologists mark the seasons by the mix of service calls we get. We're just now coming out of refrigerator season and getting into the thick of oven season. Every year, in the few days leading up to Thanksgiving Day, I can always count on a ton of last-minute, panicked service calls.


"Why is that, Samurai?" you ask.


Well, I'll tell you. For some reason, people always wait until the last few days before Thanksgiving Day to run the self-clean feature on their oven. Some folks may be thinking the oven should be clean before they cook the communal turkey in it. Others may be anticipating the meddlesome mother-in-law oven inspection. The problem is not "why" you run the self-clean, but "when." Lemme explain…


During self-clean, the temperatures inside the oven cell can exceed 900F. This is very stressful on the oven's sensor, door lock assembly, and electronic control board. If anything is on the verge of breaking, it will usually happen during the self-clean cycle. This means that if you think you're going to run the self-clean cycle in your oven, don't wait until a few days before before Thanksgiving Day, when you'll need it to cook that big turkey for a house full of guests, do it now! Then, if something does break in the oven, you'll have time to get it repaired and won't end up in a last-minute panic trying to get your oven fixed.


According to Rob Marriott, National Technical Manager for Dacor, a manufacturer of high-end ranges and ovens, "If you're going to use the self-clean feature, use it a lot or don't use it at all." The reason for this is that the most common thing to fail in an oven during self-clean is the door lock assembly. On many modern ovens, the door lock assembly has a little motor that locks and unlocks the door. This motor is controlled by the oven's electronic control board (the control panel with the digital display). If this motor isn't used on a regular basis, the accumulated grease that collects in the motor during normal use will coagulate and harden during self-clean and bind the motor so that it can't unlock the door.


The oven temperature sensor is also stressed during self-clean and is the second-most common thing to fail during or after running the self-clean cycle. Less commonly, yet still prevalent, the oven's electronic control board can fail due the extra heat it receives during self-clean.


Personally, we never run the oven self-clean cycle at the Samurai's dojo. But, I understand there are lots of valid reasons why someone would want to, two of which I mentioned above. So, if you're planning on running the self-clean in your oven, here are some...
Handy Links In Case Something Goes Wrong
Post your question, get your answer at our DIY appliance repair forums, The Samurai Appliance Repair Academy:



Get parts FAST-- even overnight and Saturday delivery-- for any brand and model of oven with a one-year return policy. Just enter your model number in the search box at the top of the page at Appliantology.org.



This picture shows you the most common places to look on your oven or range to find the model number tag.:


Happy Thanksgiving!
... and thanks for reading.
Samurai Appliance Repair Man, www.Appliantology.org






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