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Samurai Appliance Repair Man's Blog



Maintenance Kit for the Newer-Style Frigidaire-built Dryer (also sold under the GE brand)

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Appliance Parts Smarts, Dryer Repair 26 April 2013 · 631 views
Frigidaire, dryer, GE and 4 more...
One of the little secrets in the appliance manufacturing world is that the manufacturers will often build appliances for each other. One example of this is certain models of GE dryers are actually built by Frigidaire but sold under the GE label.

There are two maintenance kits out there for Frigidaire-built dryers:

- part number 5304461262 for the older-style units and

- part number 5304457724 for the newer-style units.

What's the difference? Click each of the links and above and carefully examine the photos of the parts included with each kit and try to spot the difference.

Give up? Okay, Brother vee8power, one of the wise and esteemed Master Appliantologists here at the Academy, explains the difference:

Looking at the parts breakdown for that model, it looks to me like the correct maintenance kit for your dryer is this one
http://www.repaircli...4457724/1198622

Notice in the picture that the upper felt does not have the three plastic glides. That's because the plastic glide on your dryer is attached to the drum, it is the newer design.

The 5304461262 mentioned above is for the older design, with no plastic glide on the front of the drum.
Another thing worth noting is that this is a GE brand dryer but it is built by Frigidaire. The part #'s for the kits are Frigidaire numbers. You won't find them on the parts breakdown for a GE.

Knowing how parts interchange is one way us professionals can save our customers, and our fellow forum members, some dough.

BTW... gas coils... Whirlpool, GE, an Frigidaire all have part numbers for exactly the same part. Guess which one is Generally most Expensive


To learn more about your dryer or to order parts, click here.


Source: Squeeky GE Profile gas dryer model #DPXH46GF


How to Test the Emitter-Receiver Optics Ice Maker Control Board in Whirlpool - Kitchenaid Refrigerators

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Icemaker Repair 21 April 2013 · 1,541 views
ice maker, icemaker, emitter and 1 more...
http://youtu.be/DXETmwq6aTk

You can also verify by doing the test the Brother Kurtius prescribed, reprinted here for your viewing pleasure:


1. Remove receiver board (right side) and insert wire into plug in black/black-white wire locations . This effectively bypasses the optics for test purposes. if you have no black/blk-white wires in the plug don’t panic, just chose the two wires beside the blank hole, not on the end.
2. test for voltage at the 4 wire harness plug, black to white and black to green…should have 120vac in both places. if not, inline fuse is open or wire is broken or separated in the liner. very bad and prolly not repairable (the broken wire not the fuse).
3. if voltage is present, hookup i/m and test at the points on the motor module head previously noted L and N…should have 120vac.
4. if voltage is present, install jumper between test points T and H…this should start the icemaker on a rotation if all the above outlined conditions are true. if it doesn’t, the motor on the module is bad. if it does start, reinstall i/m and wait till it fills and parks. remove jumpers and reinstall optics receiver. icemaker should work…if not, we have proven the icemaker assembly is good and the optics must be at fault, regardless of whether the light flashes are checking good or not.

If the board checks bad by this method, it's slam-dunk dead.

Emitter-Receiver Board

Posted Image


To learn more about your ice maker or to order parts, click here.


Source: KITCHENAID


How to Find the Right Parts for Your Appliances and Where to Buy Them

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Appliance Parts Smarts, Refrigerator Repair 21 April 2013 · 1,122 views
Jenn-Air, refrigerator, ADC and 3 more...
If you're looking for an appliance part, use the Appliantology parts search box at the top and bottom of every page on this web site. All parts ordered through the links and search boxes at this site come with a one year return policy, even on electrical parts and circuit boards. Here's the story of someone searching for a part who was right here at Appliantology and could have quickly found what she needed by using the parts search box. Heads up to the wise!

Your Name: Mari

Your Appliantology Username, if you have one:

What would you like to talk about? Other NON-APPLIANCE REPAIR problem

Talk to the Samurai: Hello Samurai,
It seems I have that "infamous and failure-prone adaptive defrost control board" for Jenn-Air JCD2389GEW as pictured here on your website. It has the same numbers #P19-399# SIEBE APPLIANCE CONTROLS 1996. It also has various other numbers such as MAYT78245.001, ECD#100-01103-01, 20R1448-00, 60727Q, AJW4212, JWIFSN, 062707367, and also THAILAND. I would like to know which part I would need to replace this part. My "original" still keeps the freezer and ice-maker working properly, fans are turning, and refrigerator section is cool, although probably not cool enough, but it does not defrost itself. I have to manually defrost every morning and evening to keep it going. There are so many of these Part #61005988 offered for sale at a great variety of pricing, so I don't know which to choose, as they all claim to be #61005988. I contacted Jenn-Air and was told that mine was Part #61003990. I tried ordering an inexpensive generic part #61003990/#61005988, but that didn't function at all, and did not operate my fridge at all; total waste of time and effort. I had to reinstall my original part; I have no difficulty installing the part, as I know how to do it, and I am proficient at it! I guess I need an "original", but I don't know where to obtain one. Perhaps a more expensive OEM part #61005988 would work, but now I'm almost afraid to try again. The part I tried had a number on it #MA7700112254-TH#. I assume that the "TH" stands for Thailand. It certainly DIDN'T have the #61003990 or #61005988 on it. I DON’T WANT THAT PART AGAIN! It is confusing to have all these products available with the same part number and a wide variety of different prices. I've seen so-called brand new items like this for as low as $19.95. I would appreciate your input. I need a "working" part, not a make-believe part, to waste my time and effort. WHY are there so many different prices on this item???? DOES the price affect the “workability” of the product???? WHICH PART NUMBER SHOULD I ASK FOR???? I look forward to your response. THANK YOU MOST KINDLY,
Regards, Mari


Dear Mari, O dear, dear Mari,

The solution to your dilemma was staring you in the face the whole time you were at this site when you sent me your email posted above! At both the top and bottom of every page on this site, you'll see conspicuous parts search boxes where you can enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description. There's even one right here in this blog at the top of the right-hand column!

In your case, you already knew not just the model number of your refrigerator, but the part numbers for the ADC board, too. If you paste in each of the part numbers you were wondering about, 61003990 and 61005988, one at a time into the parts search box, you'll see that they both resolve to the same part number: 61005988.

Here's the replacement ADC board you need for your Jenn-Air fridge:

ADC Board

Posted Image

I can't emphasize enough what a powerful tool the parts search boxes are at this site!

Now for the question about where to buy the part. You also mentioned buying generic parts. One word of advice on buying generic parts: DON'T! I explain why in this issue of our award-winning newsletter, Appliantology: The Oracle of Appliance Enlightenment.

BTW, if you're not a subscriber to our newsletter, Appliantology, you're missing out! Every issue is jam-packed with Special Samurai Secrets ™ for saving money, life, and limb with your appliances. Taunt your friends and delight your enemies with your amazing new knowledge! And best of all, it's FREE! Subscribe to Appliantology today.

Another thing to keep in mind is that all parts purchased through this website carry a one year no-hassle return policy, even electrical parts that have been installed! It's insane!

Also, when you buy parts through the links and search boxes on this site, a small percentage of your purchase goes to supporting this website without costing you one penny more for the parts you order. So, if you’re going to order appliance parts anyway, how ’bout using the links on this website to ensure that the Samurai will be here the next time you need appliance repair help? Can I hear an "Amen?"


Fixite Do: The Ancient Martial Art of Appliance Repair

appliance service, fixite do and 1 more...
Most folks think of appliance repair as just another one of the technical trades, like a plumber or electrician. And, it’s true, there are those who practice appliance repair as merely a trade. But did you know that appliance repair is actually an ancient martial art, older than Kung Fu, Karate Do, and Tae Kwon Do all put together? Yes, my leetle Grasshoppers, I shi’ite you not. The ancient martial art of appliance repair is called Fixite Do (pronounced “fixi-tay do”). According to archeological records, Fixite Do originated in Lower Slabovia sometime during the Fermentecean era, which began right after the Jurassic era. You may be interested to know that Samurai Appliance Repair Man is a fully trained and certifiable master in the ancient appliance repair martial art of Fixite Do. The picture below is an actual live shot of the Samurai applying his art:


Posted Image

The Samurai Demonstrates Fixite Do


Samurai's 12 Laws of Appliance Repair

12 laws, Samurais Laws
Samurai's Ichiban Law of Appliance Repair: Never replace a part unless you have proof that the part is bad.

This distinguishes the Samurai School of Appliantology from the Monkey Boy School of Appliance Repair. When I replace an appliance part, it's because I have proven that the part is bad. This proof could be something subtle, like an electrical measurement, or something simple, like laying eyeballs on a burned wire connection. It could be direct, meaning the part is getting proper input but not giving proper output. Or it could be indirect, meaning that all other parts involved in the problem check out good so it's the bad part by process of elimination. This latter technique is more prevalent in the newer appliances with electronic boards where the manufacturer either doesn't give enough information about the board's inputs and outputs or the information/schematics it does supply are wrong.

Samurai's 2nd Law of Appliance Repair: All machines break.

I don't care how much you paid, who made it, or what the salesperson told you, appliances are just another type of machine. And all machines, like everything else in the physical world (including our bodies) tend inexorably toward entropy, i.e., they wear out and breakdown. The corollary to the 2nd Law is to buy appliances that are easy to repair because, at some point during its useful life, you will be repairing it. Speaking of useful life, how long should appliances last?

Samurai's 3rd Law of Appliance Repair: Measure twice, order once.

Ok, you've diligently observed Samurai's Ichiban Law of Appliance Repair and have proven that a part is bad based on some type of objective observation. If this observation involved making an electrical measurement, such as voltage, current, or resistance, then make that measurement TWICE just to be doubly-woubly sure that you didn't make a mistake. Common mistakes in making electrical measurements include not making good contact with your probe and not removing at least one wire from the component before making a continuity or resistance measurement.

Samurai's 4th Law of Appliance Repair: Beliefs are for religion, not appliance repair.

In appliance repair, we use test instruments to quantify the problem and draw definitive conclusions about cause and effect. Hope, beliefs, and wishful thinking don't get stuff fixed, unless it's by pure, blind luck.

Samurai's 5th Law of Appliance Repair: Electronics and wet appliances do not mix.

Manufacturers love using fancy electronical boards for things that used to be done by simple, reliable mechanical switches. I see these boards fail frequently and at far greater expense than the good ol' mechanical switches. But the failure rate of these cheesy, over-priced electronical boards in the wet appliances (washer, dishwasher, ice and water dispensers on refrigerators) is excessively high. If you have a choice when buying new appliances, opt for the models with few or no electronic boards.

Samurai's 6th Law of Appliance Repair: Begin troubleshooting right at the problem.

Where else you gonna start? No water coming in your dishwasher? Start at the water inlet valve. Gas oven won't bake? Start at the ignitor. Go right to the main thing that ain't doing its thang.

Samurai's 7th Law of Appliance Repair: All leaks are visual.

Let's say your washer is leaking. You see the water seeping from under the washer cabinet. So you go online to the Samurai School of Appliantology and say, "my washer is leaking, what should I do?" And we'll tell you to remove the front panel and get some eyeballs on where exactly the leak is coming from. Same deal with your dishwasher-- remove the kickplate and peer underneath with a flashlight while it's running to spot the source of the leak. Get the picture?

Samurai's 8th Law of Appliance Repair: Fix the obvious problems first.

If you have an appliance that you think may have several things wrong with it, you have to break down the problem into smaller component problems and then fix each one. Usually, when you fix the obvious problem first, you find that it was the only problem all along. Other times, you cannot even diagnose the other problems until you've fixed the obvious one(s).

Samurai's 9th Law of Appliance Repair: Nothing kills bio-gookus like chlorine.

Just remember this next time you're dealing with a restricted condensate drain in your refrigerator. Bio-gookus loves to grow in dark, moist environments like condensate drain tubes and they'll restrict the flow the same way plaque does in arteries.

Samurai's 10th Law of Appliance Repair: Never move an appliance to make a repair unless you absolutely have to.

This is one I learned the hard way. You never know what you're gonna run into (that you didn't need to) when you move an appliance. And, worse yet, you may end up creating a new repair that you hadn't planned on. The classic example is pulling a dryer out just a few inches only to find that it had some impossible dryer vent connection that requires a contortionist/gymnast to re-attach. Oy!

Samurai's 11th Law of Appliance Repair: Raw power is dirty power.

All electricity is not created equal. Power quality varies widely from place to place. Depending on where you live, power at the wall outlets in your house could have all kinds of garbage on it. Stuff like voltage surges, sags, swells, and spikes can kill electrical and electronics equipment. In this modern era of using electronic control boards in appliances for the jobs that simple, reliable mechanical switches used to do, all your appliances should be protected by simple surge protectors at the least. Just like you wouldn't (or shouldn't) plug your computer directly into the wall outlet without using some type of surge protection, neither should you expose your appliances to naked, raw power.

Samurai's 12th Law of Appliance Repair: Neutral is not ground; ground is not neutral.

Under normal circumstances, neutral and ground should have the same, or close to the same, electrical potential. But, electrically, neutral and ground are not the same thing and serve entirely different purposes. Back in the old days, they were often used interchangeably, as with the old three-wire dryer and range cords. But, after lots of people got themselves fried or burned their houses down due to a ground fault, "They" decided it would be a good idea to respect the distinction between ground and neutral. Hence the new four-wire dryer and range connections.

Samurai's Golden Rule of Appliance Repair: Never trust customer diagnostics.

I'm too embarrassed to admit how many times I've been burned by violating the Golden Rule. You'll get some customers that are so eloquent and seem so erudite and technically proficient that you'll be tempted to accept their diagnosis over the phone (at their insistence-- to save money, of course). So when you bop on over with the special-ordered part that doesn't fix the problem, you're now in a quandary: how do you charge for this wasted repair effort and the cost of returning a special-ordered part...if you can even return it? Unless you bought the control board here, electronic boards cannot be returned once they're installed. The hard lesson is to always do your own diagnosis, no matter how much the customer insists otherwise.






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