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3 Sure-Fire Ways to Spot an Appliance Repair Hack in Your Home

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Appliance Repair Service 29 July 2015 · 531 views
appliance repair, technicians and 2 more...

[A Note to my Brethren in the Craft: This article is released into the Public Domain. You are encouraged to copy it, modify it as you wish, post it on your website and social networks, with or without attribution, your choice. The objective is to raise consumer awareness about the rampant problem of moral and technical deficiency plaguing our trade today. We need to expose these hacks and parts changing monkeys who are ripping people off, either knowingly or through willful ignorance, and giving us real technicians, who know how to troubleshoot and take pride in our work, a bad name. Together, we can clean up our trade and remove the tainted image it has in the public perception.]

 

A Consumer's Guide to Recognizing Charlatans, Hacks, and Parts Changing Monkeys in the Appliance Repair Trade

 

Have you or someone you love been victimized by an appliance hack?

 

Have your appliances been defiled by a Parts Changing Monkey?

 

Do you feel clueless when trying to decide which appliance repair company to hire?

 

Do you feel helpless and vulnerable when trying to evaluate the accuracy (and truthfulness) of the guy standing in your home telling you what's wrong with your refrigerator?

 

To protect your appliances, your precious time, and your wallet from incompetent repairmen, first you need to know a little bit about the trade.

 

The Problem with the Appliance Repair Trade Today

 

An epidemic of ignorance exists in the appliance repair trade today. In fact, there is a shortage of skilled labor in all of the skilled trades across all sectors of the US economy. For a variety of complicated reasons, all the subject of a separate interesting and scintillating article, the appliance repair trade in particular has been hit by a brain drain and a critical skill shortage. This has actually been building for the past 20 years but has become particularly acute in the last five or so years as appliances have become more computerized and more complicated to troubleshoot.

 

This situation leaves consumers especially vulnerable. Because, on the one hand, more complicated appliances makes it even more difficult for consumers to understand how the appliance works. On the other hand, it has accentuated a critical skill gap that already existed in the trade because many of the guys who were able to get by on the older, simpler appliances by simply guessing and changing parts find that it's a much more expensive proposition to do that on these new, electronic appliances with their pricey control boards. And who ends up paying for their ignorance and guesswork? You got it: YOU the consumer.

 

In the trade, the remnant of us real technicians call these bad actors various names such as hacks and charlatans. But the most common one that you will hear among the Appliantological Illuminati is Parts Changing Monkey (PCM).

 

You are not alone! The manufacturers are also getting screwed big time by these PCMs. That's because they have to hire these PCMs to do their warranty work. So, Monkey Boy goes out on the service call, guesses the wrong part, then has to order another part and come back at a later date to try his next guess. This costs the manufacturer money in extra parts and it costs you aggra-dollars-- time and inconvenience in a delayed repair for something that should have been done in the first trip and in a timely manner.

 

If these PCMs are so gawd-awful, then why are the manufacturers even using them? The answer is: What other choice do they have? Yep, it's slim pickins out in the appliance repair technician field today.

 

The other fact of life is that the manufacturers pay so little for warranty work that many of the sharp technicians choose not to do it and instead focus exclusively on the more profitable COD work. The end result is that getting a warranty technician is often (not always) a lot like getting a public defender; you're usually getting a second or third rate guy.

 

By the way, these are the same guys that the manufacturer will refer you to if you call them to ask for their "authorized servicers." You will still need to evaluate these guys yourself!

 

Who am I to be telling you what constitutes a charlatan, hack, and PCM? Well, if you're really interested, you can read my bio. Over the last couple of decades I've been running my own service business and I've also interacted with thousands of consumers and techs, as well as many manufacturers, through my online appliance tech-help (Appliantology.org) and tech-training (MasterSamuraiTech.com) websites. I know what's out there-- the good, the bad, and the butt-ugly.

 

So, the burning question you're asking yourself right now is, "How is the hapless consumer to recognize a Parts Changing Monkey when he's telling me what he thinks is wrong with my appliance?"

 

Come with me now on a Journey of Total Appliance Enlightenment...

 

How to Recognize a Charlatan, Hack, or PCM in Your Home

 

1. If your “tech” walks in and sees you have a Samsung, LG, or Miele (or other higher-end brand) and immediately goes off on how these brands are junk and how you need to get yourself a Whirlpool, this is a surefire sign that the guy is a hack. A lot of parts-changers don’t like Samsung, LG, etc. because those brands have a lot of new, electronic parts and control boards in their appliances, which require technical skills such as reading the schematic diagrams and taking electrical measurements to accurately troubleshoot the problem.

 

Parts-changers don’t know how to read schematics and therefore don't know how to make real diagnoses, and despite the availability of ways to learn that skill they refuse, out of laziness or pride, to learn real troubleshooting. Willful ignorance is rampant among appliance hacks. They like brands like Whirlpool because they are familiar with them and know how to change the right parts to fix common problems. If a “tech” comes into your home and acts like this, you’ll know what he really is.

 

2. The second indicator that a “tech” is really a PCM is when he is confronted with a warming refrigerator and says that it "needs more Freon" in the sealed system. This should rarely–if ever–be done to a fridge. The procedure to add refrigerant is time-consuming and expensive, and really not worth it compared to the cost of replacing the fridge. Furthermore, most of the causes of a warming refrigerator are in the defrost system, fans, or controls, not the sealed system.

 

3. The most infamous charlatans out there like to a play a certain game with their customers. After the problem has been “diagnosed”, they’ll replace a part. If that doesn’t fix the problem, the hacks just say “Oh, it must have been something else in addition to that”, and replace yet another part. They continue to charge you, the customer, for each part they replace. In other words, you are paying for them to guess at which parts will fix the problem until they finally get the right one.

 

There are very few instances where a trained and skilled technician would troubleshoot your appliance and justifiably not be able to tell that a second part was involved in the problem. And if he did miss that the first time around, a good and honest technician will own up to that oversight and not charge you as if there was nothing he could have done about it.

 

If you've experienced any of these three behaviors from an appliance servicer, it's time to try someone else! Look for a technician who invests in his training, including ongoing training over the years. Many of the best techs are active at Appliantology.org and/or get their training from reputable training institutions such as the Samurai Tech Academy!




What does the run capacitor do in split-phase compressor circuits?

compressor, refrigerator and 2 more...

The run capacitor is wired in series with the start winding. When the compressor first starts, the run capacitor is shunted by the closed PTC (or whatever start relay or device is being used) so current just flows through the main and start windings which are in parallel with each other. The start winding is there to create that split-phase magnetic field that's out of phase with the main winding field that rotates around the stator. This rotating magnetic field is what starts the rotor turning from a dead stop.

Posted Image

After the compressor has started and is up and running, the PTC opens which removes the shunt from the run capacitor. Now the run capacitor and start winding are in series with each other and both are in parallel with the main winding.

Posted Image

At this point, the run capacitor does a couple things:

1) limits current flow through the start winding

2) smooths out the back EMF pulses from the main winding.

The net effect of the run capacitor is to reduce the current draw of the compressor while running (which also helps it run a bit cooler) and to help the compressor run smoother and more efficiently.

If the run capacitor were shorted (ie., replaced by a wire), the compressor would still start but the compressor would draw A LOT more current, run very rough, and quickly kickout on thermal overload.

I have never seen a run capacitor fail short.


Learn more about refrigerators and how to troubleshoot them in the Refrigerators training course at the Samurai Tech Academy.




Source: Sub Zero 632-S S/N prior to 1810000


Learn Appliance Repair Online at the Samurai Tech Academy - Limited Time Tuition Discount!

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Appliance Repair Training 06 July 2015 · 363 views
appliance school and 2 more...


Learn appliance repair at the best online appliance repair school on the web! Act now to take advantage of this limited-time offer for a 14% tuition discount. Offer ends July 11, 2015. Use the coupon code FREEDOM14 on the Enroll page: http://mastersamurai...ine-enrollment/

Check out all our appliance repair training courses here: http://mastersamurai...repair-courses/

http://mastersamuraitech.com/


Dielectric Grease: Myths and Reality

dielectric grease
There's a lot of misinformation and mythology out there in the tech community about the use of dielectric grease on electrical connections. Some techs, knowing that the word "dielectric" refers to an electrically insulating material, mistakenly conclude that dielectric grease should never be used on electrical connections. This is based on a misunderstanding about how dielectric grease works.

Dielectric grease has two main properties that make it especially desirable specifically for use on electrical connections, especially in wet environments such as refrigerators and washing machines. In fact, this is its primary intended design use. Those properties are:

1. Low viscosity. This means that the grease will readily get out of the way of two metal contacts touching each other and flow around the contacts giving rise to the second desirable properly...

2. Sealant effect. As the dielectric grease flows around the contacts, it seals out moisture and oxygen preventing them from reaching the contacts and causing corrosion and/or oxidation.

Still don't believe me? How about Frigidaire tech bulletin RF1207:

Recommendation for Use of Dielectric Grease on French Door Models with Bullet-Style FFIM (RF1207)

Water intrusion into electrical connections within the FFIM causes intermittent interruption of ice production and melting of ice in the bin.

Symptoms: No ice in FF
Ice melting in the ice bin while FFIM is
turned on

Models Affected: All ICON, Electrolux and Frigidaire models with Bullet-Style FFIM

Solution: Use dielectric grease Part number: 5304485963

Part number: 5304485963

to improve electrical connections inside the FFIM. Application is recommended on EEV, TH3, TH1 and fan connectors, however it can also be used on any connector within the FFIM assembly. In general, if all diagnostics pass and the unit has 8.1/8.5 FFIM board yet the unit is either not producing or not maintaining ice, water intrusion into electrical connection can be suspected and dielectric grease may resolve the problem.

Bulletin is in the Downloads section here, starting on page 1-5.


Basic Electricity Demonstrated on the Hoary Cliffs of Moher

cliffs of moher and 3 more...
In this video, filmed on the hoary Cliffs of Moher in Ireland, I demonstrate basic electrical principles, like voltage and current path, using an electric cow fence charged with 5,000 volts. See, even when I'm on vacation, I'm thinking of ways I can explain this stuff to y'all!








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