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Samurai Appliance Repair Man's Blog



The Silver Bullet Fix for LE Error Codes in LG Dishwashers

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Dishwasher Repair 06 December 2013 · 679 views
LG, dishwasher, LE, error code and 1 more...
Of all the error codes seen in LG dishwashers, the LE error is probably the common one asked about in The Samurai Appliance Repair Academy Kitchen Forum. So much so that it seemed like this one needed a Silver Bullet answer. And who better to fire that silver bullet than the Dean of LG Appliantology himself, john63. Y'all go grab you a cold one and let's listen to the big guns going off:

Replacing the SUMP ASSY (AJH31248604) and protecting/repairing (as needed) the Wire Loom inside the door assembly---will resolve your immediate problem ("LE" error).

The "LE" error is *extremely* common for all LG dishwashers built from 2004 through mid-2008.

The cause of the Wash Motor failure is due a process during manufacturing---that degraded/damaged the Wash Motor.

Replacing the entire Sump Assy makes perfect sense in this case (as opposed to just the Wash Motor) since the new design Sump Assy has a much better design internal gasket.
The original Sump Assy gaskets were extremely challenging to re-install (disassembly is required to replace the Wash Motor).
Replacing the Sump Assy---also has the benefit of having a new...

1) Wash Motor
2) Heating Element and internal Thermistor
3) Drain Motor
4) Soil Level Sensor
5) Vario Motor (switches water from lower washer arm-to-middle and upper wash arms---every 90 seconds)

After removing the door panel----inspect the Wire Loom from the bottom of the door-up-to-the-Detergent-Dispenser-Assy.

Repair wiring as needed.

Wrap the entire Wire Harness with electrical tape---from the bottom of the door up to the Detergent Dispenser Assy

Insert a cardboard cut-out---behind the Wire Harness---to further isolate the wiring from the Tar-Like Thermal/Sound Insulation of the door liner.

**********

<<<I haven't fixed appliances before, but I'm a DIY guy in general.>>>

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In that case---I'll provide some recommendations to further improve the dishwasher performance & reliability (especially if you are planning to replace the Sump Assembly).

Replace the following items:

1) Guide Assembly (4975DD1001A)

The Guide Assembly has been updated (improvement)---to eliminate the oft-elusive symptom of once-in-a-blue-moon water leaking from the lower corner of the door.

Replacement Guide Assys include a new FLOAT ASSY. Not only has this been re-designed (elimination of Styrofoam floats)---but since Tri-Sodium-Phosphate (TSP) is no longer used in dishwasher detergent (beginning July 2010---many FLOAT ASSYs are becoming clogged with fatty/greasy residue. This in turn---causes incorrect water fill/filling then draining/poor wash performance/water-on-floor-complaints.
This accumulation of sticky residue is becoming so commonplace---that replacing the Guide Assy is virtually mandatory (when I service an LG dishwasher).

Prior to July 2010---TSP in dishwashing detergent would chemically-react with the fatty/oily deposits in the dishwasher---and CONVERT it to a soap/detergent.
This chemical change (fat-to-detergent) is called "Saponification".
Today---dishwasher detergent cleans---not by saponification---but by "Enzyme" method (breaks down fatty/oily deposits into smaller pieces).
Hence---the oily/fatty residue remains with the wash water---and ideally or in theory---should be eventually rinsed/drained from the dishwasher---provided that the cycle duration/run time is longer than a "normal" cycle AND the wash/rinse water temperature is hot enough to effective remove the residue---sufficiently.

My experience has been that---over time---deposits will gum-up the Guide/Float Assy (and the hose leading to it from the Sump Assy) to the point of rendering the dishwasher essentially useless.

It's also why I believe that LG introduced an all-new re-designed dishwasher---shortly after the TSP-ban (entirely different water level sensing method---a water frequency sensor rather than using floats).

As an option---the Drain Hose (AEM6943803) can be replaced as well. This re-designed hose is intended to be used with the (also re-designed) Guide Assy. The correction was to prevent loss-of-wash-water during the Wash Cycle---especially in situations where the drain hose has been incorrectly installed into the floor---to a drain connection in the basement/crawl space.
This would eliminate "air sucking sounds" and heating element damage due to frequent insufficient amount of water in the tub during the cycle.

Lastly---installing a new (yes-re-designed) Filter Assy (ADQ32598202) can reduce the possibility of hard debris entering the Sump Assy during the cycle. The filter area has smaller openings to resist glass shards and other debris---such as a toothpick.

Before I forget---if you've replace the Sump Assy---and all works beautifully---but now you're noticing a whistle/growling sound during the wash cycle---post back:)

The CHOPPER/MASCERATOR was inexplicably changed from a good design with not-so-pointed ends on it----to a design which best resembles the tip of an indian arrowhead.
This pointed tip---causes whistling and/or grinding during wash.
The original Chopper was brought back---to stop the noise complaint (sigh).

Good Luck!



Source: LG LDF6810ST Error Code "LE"


Diagnosing Catastrophic Front Load Washer Drum Bearing and Inner Basket Failures

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Washing Machine Repair 02 December 2013 · 2,739 views
front load, washer, drum, bearing and 2 more...
Front Load Washers Rule!

First, lemme start off by saying I love front load washers. I think they offer the best clothes washing technology out there combining low water use with a gentle tumble wash that's easy on the fabrics, making your clothes last longer, and does a very thorough job of cleaning the clothes compared to the high efficiency (HE) top load washers.

We're a family of five with dogs and cats. We've used a front load washer for over 16 years at our house and, aside from routine repairs, have never had any washability or odor complaints. You'll hear some people complain about these issues with their front loader but, in almost every case I've seen during service calls, it's been due to user error-- usually using too much or the wrong type of detergent.


The Economics of a Repair

Okay, so front load washers: rah-rah, go team go. Why have a special post dedicated to front load washer drum bearing and inner basket failures?

Because these failures are usually considered a "total" event (as in "Dude, I totalled my car last night") by professional Appliantologists due of the huge cost of the repair. Not only are the parts expensive (sometimes more than $500) but the job itself can take more than three hours (depending on the particular nightmares you run into) and usually require a second man... or one with a very strong back, though it may not be after completing one of these repairs solo!

Everything is repairable. The question is: does it make economic sense to do the repair?

There are two circumstances where it may make economic sense to repair a failed drum bearing or inner basket support spider:

1. You are going to do the repair yourself, so you're only paying for parts.
2. The machine is still under full or partial manufacturer's warranty and some or all of the cost of the repair will be covered.

So, if you're in a situation where neither of the above conditions apply, wouldn't it be nice if you could positively diagnose a bearing or basket failure on your own and at least save yourself the cost of a service call? Ya sure, ya betcha! And hence, the raison d'être for this post.


How to Tell if Your Washer has Bad Drum Bearings or a Broken Inner Basket

Okay, enough talk. Let's do some basic watching and listening.

1. Broken Inner Basket



The inner basket is supported in the back by a special metal structure called a "spider." The spider has three support members that extend from the basket hub to the outer perimeter. A common failure is for the support members to corrode by galvanic corrosion, eventually weakening the metal to the point that it breaks. Here's an example of what that looks like, this particular washer is a Frigidaire but this is typical regardless of brand:

Posted Image


Here's another example, but this is from a GE front loader:

Posted Image


What you see in these photos is called galvanic corrosion. Various theories abound as to whence cometh this galvanic doo-doo. Some of the more plausible ones include:

- Dissimilar metals used in the support members vs. the basket metal itself.
- Certain combinations of hard water and detergents.
- Running the washer on a non-grounded or improperly grounded outlet.

Regardless of the cause, which is a whole separate and interesting engineering discussion, if this happens to your washer, your immediate tasks are to 1) properly and positively identify this failure and 2) decide whether to repair or replace based on the economics of the situation.


2. Bad Drum Bearings

This failure usually manifests as a roaring noise during the spin cycle. This first video demonstrates the tell-tale sound of bad drum bearings:




In advanced stages of this failure, you can also diagnose bad bearings manually using this technique:




Ruh-row, trouble in washer-land! These drum bearings are factory-pressed into the back half of the drum. So it's not like you can buy a set of OEM bearings, pop 'em in and off you go. You have to replace the whole drum, at least the back half, with the factory-installed bearings. Problem is that you'll usually find the drive shaft on the inner basket so corroded that you'll need to replace the inner basket at the same time. Double whammy!

If you look around the Internet, you'll find third-party bearings that claim to be a drop-in replacement for the factory-installed bearings. I've not heard of a single case of this repair lasting more than a few months. If you've done this repair and have gotten longer than a year out of it, send me proof and you'll be a rock star.

The reason these third-party bearings have such a dismal reliability record is because the tolerance on these bearings is astonishingly tight. When you consider the pressure and speeds that these bearings need to work in, it's amazing they last as long as they do. These bearings are actually a precision-machined piece and that's why they have to be installed at the factory for maximum reliability.


Dispelling Two Big Urban Myths about the F35 / Sud Error Codes in Whirlpool Duet Front Load Washers

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Washing Machine Repair 01 December 2013 · 1,063 views
Whirlpool, washer, F35, Sud and 3 more...
The F35 / Sud error code is one of the more common codes to pop up in the display of the late-model Whirlpool Duet front load washers. There's a lot of urban mythology out there on the Internet about these codes, their causes, and how to fix them. I'm going to deal with the two most prevalent myths out there and inoculate you against their error.

Urban Myth Number 1: "The F35 / Sud error code is caused by a clogged drain pump and to fix it, you have to clean out the drain pump cleanout port."

Reality: The drain pump and its cleanout port have absolutely nothing to do with this particular error code. The control board is programmed to display completely different error codes pertaining to the drain pump such as:

- F01 Pump driver error
- F21 Long drain time
- F27 Overflow condition

You can find these yourself on the tech sheet located inside the washer, either under the top panel or behind the bottom front panel. On that tech sheet, you'll see over six pages of very specific error codes-- 30 in all! -- dealing with distinct, specific aspects on the machine's function and operation.

The F35 error code specifically deals with faults related to the Analog Pressure Sensor (APS). The Sud error code pertains to excess suds detection in the machine. When these two codes occur together (and they don't always), it leads you to a very specific diagnosis but one which has nothing to do with the drain pump.

I know there's a video out on Youtube with a lot of views where the guy claims this fixed it but I assure you that was purely coincidental. He was a DIYer who was just guessing. Saying that a poor drain caused the F35 / Sud error combo is like saying a flat tire caused your car engine to quit starting.


Urban Myth Number 2: "To clear the F35 error code, try pulling the rubber tube off the APS and blowing hard into the tube nipple on the APS to reset it."

Reality: Blowing into the APS does absolutely nothing good. But it does ruin an APS that was already good. These are not like the old bellows pressure switches. Analog pressure sensors are digital transducers that convert an analog pressure into a digital information stream for the CCU. Telling people to blow into the APS is simply going to make them ruin a hundred+ dollar part.

There is some merit, however, to pulling the black rubber tube off the APS and blowing into it back toward the drum (NOT into the APS) to clear any gookus that may have gotten lodged in there and is interfering with the changes in air pressure being sent up the tube to the APS.


The Light of Truth

Let's take a walk through a Whirlpool Duet washer with the F35 / Sud error code combo and investigate its real cause and how to fix it:



Here's the link to the Analog Pressure Sensor (APS) that I replaced to fix the problem in this particular model: http://www.repaircli...0415587/1938628

As mentioned in the video, a defective APS is the single-most common cause for the F35 / Sud error code combo. There are at least two variations on the APS theme, so be sure to look up the correct sensor based on your complete model number and buy it here. That way, in the off chance that the APS doesn't fix it, you can return it for a refund and buy either the CCU or the Steamer board.


How to troubleshoot a Bosch dishwasher that won't finish a cycle, runs forever, or shows 2H in the display

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Dishwasher Repair 29 November 2013 · 1,618 views
Bosch, dishwasher, cycle, heater and 1 more...
This is always a problem with the dishwasher's water heating system. In Bosch dishwashers, if they can't heat the water enough, they'll just keep running until they do. Kinda dumb design, I think. In comparison, Whirlpool-built dishwashers at least give you an obvious fault code like the clean light flashing seven times. But, I rectum that's my Pro-Amerkan bias bleedin' through. :blinky:

Water heating problems in Bosch dishwashers come down to one of two problems:

- problem with the control board not sending voltage to the heater assembly or

- problem with the heater assembly itself

How's a brutha supposed to know which is which? Ah, Grasshoppah, come with me now on a journey of Total Appliance Enlightenment ™...

Remove the front panel so you can access the control board wiring.

Put one lead of your meter in the control board where the red wire connects. That's the heater power supply line. Attach the other lead of your meter to chassis ground.

Start the dishwasher in Quick Wash.

You're looking for 120vac on your meter. Wait for it, wait for it...

If you don't get 120vac there, you're done: order the new control board based on your exact, complete model number.

If you need help opening the dishwasher door and accessing the control panel, see this video.

If you get voltage there, then you know the control board is working for the Quick Wash cycle. However, I have seen several times where the control board puts out the voltage on the Quick Wash cycle but not the Normal cycle. At this point, you need to make a current draw measurement through the red wire to see if current is actually flowing through the heater now that you're getting voltage (about 9 amps for a good heater). If you are getting current, this confirms that the heater is good; again, replace the control board. If, OTOH, you are NOT getting current flow with 120vac present on the red wire, then you need to replace the heater assembly, the specfic heater you need will depend on your exact, complete model number, which is always read from the tag on the dishwasher itself, not from the paperwork or useless User Guide.

Go ye forth and conquer!


Icemaker Wiring Info for Frigidaire Whirlpool and LG Refrigerators

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Icemaker Repair, Refrigerator Repair 29 November 2013 · 575 views
icemaker, ice maker, wiring and 3 more...
Sometimes, you want to use an ice maker made from one manufacturer in a refrigerator made by a different manufacturer. The trick is knowing how to map out the wire harness so you can splice the wires into the harness in the right order and not pop the breaker or blow out the ice maker.

Brother Reginald has prepared this nice table that lists wire cross reference info for Whirlpool, Frigidaire, and LG ice makers. Wire away!

Posted Image



Source: How do I splice ice maker wires?






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