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Samurai Appliance Repair Man's Blog



How to test the touchpanel keyswitch contacts in a Maytag MDB dishwasher

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Dishwasher Repair 04 September 2011 · 1,326 views

Master Reg lays out the drill:

Checking keyswitch contacts:

Unplug dishwasher or disconnect power.
Remove connector P1 from the control board.
Using the table below,
http://appliantology...-ii-dishwasher/
measure the resistance across the switch when the key is pressed.
NOTE: The meter must be connected with the proper polarity.
This test will not work on models with a “touch sensor” type user interface.
The resistance reading should go from infinity (open circuit) with the key open
down to a readable Ω level with the key pressed.
The level may be different depending on your meter, since there is a diode in the circuit.
If available, you could use the “Diode Test” function of a digital meter,
which will give a voltage to turn on the diode in the circuit.
➔If any switches fail this test, replace the console panel/keypad assembly.
➔If all switches test OK, replace the machine control board.

KeyPad assembly
click on picture
Posted Image


Part links:

W10240046 Black
W10240047 White
W10240048 Biscuit


Source: Maytag mdb6709aws0 dishwasher inop.


Check your notification settings for your watched forums and topics

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Forum Tips 02 September 2011 · 802 views

I upgraded the forum software to the latest version. Went pretty smoothly and we're sporting a clean new look with lots of cool new features. But, as always, there's bound to be a glitch or two. One in particular that's come to my attention is the notification settings for your watched forums and topics.

I noticed I wasn't getting notifications of replies to topic that I had posted in. I also wasn't getting notifications for new posts in forums I'm watching. Have had others message me about this, too. Turns out this is a "known" issue with the upgrade; known to developers but not to me!

But no biggie-- the fix is easy: just check/reset your notification settings in your control panel.

Watch my short screencast that shows you how to do this ==> http://screencast.com/t/v2oCSzRdY


Troubleshooting information on transorbs used in GE Triton dishwashers

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Dishwasher Repair 01 September 2011 · 2,102 views

First, begin with my seminal tome on the topic ==> http://fixitnow.com/...ircuit-breaker/

And then on to this enrichment material from Master Reg:

here's some info.

also: Service Bulletin GE TRITON XL DISHWASHERS

GSD6000 SERIES
PDW7000 SERIES
EDW4000 SERIES

Transorb kit

*Shorted Transorb will likely damage the main electronic control board.
click on picture
Posted Image

seems to be a 1.5KE220CA Bi-directional TVS Diode
(about $1)
1500w peak 220v C = bi-directional

Posted Image


Source: GE Dishwasher Mod# GSD3900L00BB


How to disassemble the door on a Frigidaire range oven to clean the glass

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Oven-Range-Stove Repair 28 August 2011 · 3,457 views

The job is done and my wife is very happy.

For those of you out there who are like me and new to self appliance repair I wanted to post a few of my own details in case someone else stumbles across this post with a similar issue.

  • As Kurtiusinterupptus explained above, there are two tabs at the hinges that pull down toward the door and then lay flat to allow the door to be removed. Once these are down you close the door, it will not close all the way, so do not try to force it.. There will be a 8" or so gap like you may leave open if you are cooling the stove off. Once you meet this point simply lift straight up and out and it should come free. The door is not too heavy, but be prepared to take the weight.
  • For this model there are screws on the inside panel (facing up or topside if you laid it down with the handle facing the floor) and on the bottom edge that need to be removed.
    • There are six screws on the inside panel (3 per side), but only the ones that need to be removed are at the top (opposite the handle).
      • I took out all six, but found out the bottom four simply hold in the hinge assembly, so I put them back in.
    • When you remove the two screws that are through the handle, remember that this will release the handle from the door. If this is the only thing you have propping up the door (mine was laying flat, handle down, on a towel) the door will drop the two inches or so to the floor. No harm done for me, but I wished I had thought of it before.
    • The handle screws are held in place between the door panels by a metal bushing type thing (it certainly has a proper name that I do not know). They just sort of fell out on me, and I had no idea what they were, which was a little distressing at first as I was trying to make careful note so I could put it back together. I figured out what they were and really appreciated them when I put things back together as they made getting the screws though the outside panel a breeze at the were held firmly in place.
    • There are 4 screws on the bottom edge that all need to come out.
  • The inside panel will lift right out at this point and can be set aside. The inside glass is held in place by screws so there was no risk of it falling out.
    • I cleaned the glass lightly with windex, then water.
  • The glass for the outside panel just sorta sits there, so don't go picking up the door or it can fall out.
    • I cleaned this lightly as well with windex and water and just left it in place the whole time.
  • For reassembly, I set the handle screws through the inside panel and though the locking bushings I described above and they stood up nicely. Dropping the panel into place and getting the screws through to the other side of the outside panel was a breeze. Once it was through, I stood the door up and held the two panels in place with my hands.
    • There is a little bit of finagling that you have to do to keep pressure on the panels while getting the handle in place and screwed down. I wish I had had help for this step, but it's possible on your own.
      • It was during this step that I noticed there was a bunch of gunk built up on the outside panel under where the handles go. I never saw it before as I left the door face down the whole time. I cleaned it in place while holding the door, but in retrospect, I would have taken the outside glass out while the door was disassembled, turned it over and cleaned it.
    • The bottom 4 screws will zip right in.
  • Putting the door back on is just the reverse of the removal step above.
Thanks to Kurtiusinterupptus and Kdog for responding to my post.

I hope my additional ramblings above are of use to someone.


Source: Frigidaire Electric Stove FEFL79GCA


Appliantology Newsletter, August 2011: Appliances and Disasters


Appliantology Newsletter, August 2011: Appliances and Disasters

0. Introduction
1. Can I use my appliances during a disaster?
2. Does it hurt my appliances to run them or have them plugged in while the power is blinking on and off?
3. Can running my appliances off a generator damage them?
4. What about water?
5. How do I store food safely while the power is out?
6. Epilogue

### ### ### ###

0. Introduction

With Hurricane Irene rampaging up the East Coast and record-breaking earthquakes off the coast of Virginia (or a nuclear detonation in a sea bed bunker, depending on who you're listening to), disaster prep seemed like the obvious topic du jour for this Special Irene Edition of *Appliantology*.

### ### ### ###

1. Can I use my appliances during a disaster?

Using appliances during a storm or other disaster can be risky to the appliance because of the power going on and off, voltage spikes (more on that below), trees falling on power lines, etc.

Even most gas appliances need electricity. For example, the spark module for your gas stove burners won't work though the burners are still usable by manually lighting the gas, which is perfectly fine; it's safe and doesn't hurt the appliance. Just don't use the gas stove to heat your house!

Most modern gas ovens with hot surface ignition require 120vac to heat up the ignitor and there's no manual bypass for that so, without a power source, you won't have an oven.

### ### ### ###

2. Does it hurt my appliances to run them or have them plugged in while the power is blinking on and off?

Absolutely! Every time that power blinks off and goes back on, it slams your appliances with transient voltage spikes. Depending on the severity of the spikes, these can fry control boards right away or slowly degrade them over time through a process called electronic rust. After getting slammed with a finite number of such spikes, the electronic control board(s) will eventually fail (at great expense and inconvenience to you).

To prevent this unhappy and completely avoidable scenario, any appliance with an electronic control board in it-- which is most of 'em today-- should be plugged into a surge suppressor, not directly into the wall. Surge suppressors for common household 120vac outlets are inexpensive and you can get 'em at your local hardware store. This will provide reasonable protection for all your 120vac appliances. Read more about surge protection for your appliances here... http://fixitnow.com/?p=1523

To protect your 240vac appliances with fancy control boards during a storm, such as an electric range with a digital display, you should switch off the circuit breaker to that appliance until the coast is clear.

### ### ### ###

3. Can running my appliances off a generator damage them?

If you haven't purchased a generator by now, it's probably too late for the Irene event. But in case you can (or already have a generator you're planning to use), here are some fun facts to know and tell about using generators with appliances.

For appliances with electronic control boards-- which is most appliances today-- you should only use generators that produce a pure sine wave output.

Most generators produce a modified sine wave output, which is not a pure sine wave but more of a stylized square wave. This is fine for motors but not good for the AC-to-DC rectifiers in appliances. The modified sine wave messes with the rectifier, making it overheat and crank out off-spec voltages for the control board. The result is often burned out rectifiers and fried control boards.

Producing a pure sine wave output requires much more sophisticated circuitry in the inverter and usually only comes with more expensive, higher-end generators. It's a big selling point, too, so if a generator doesn't specifically say it's a pure sine wave generator, then it's safest to assume that it only puts out a modified sine wave.

So, if you do not have a generator that produces a pure sine wave output, be careful to only run appliances that do not have electronic control boards.

Oh, and one point of safety: don't run your generator inside the house. I know, it sounds crazy to even say it but there are knuckleheads out there who do that kind of thing. Like this guy... http://fixitnow.com/?p=693

### ### ### ###

4. What about water?

Flood waters in urban areas are a lethal cocktail of sewage, petroleum products, and just about every kind of chemical you can imagine. Simple disinfection (e.g., boiling, chlorine drops, iodine drops, etc.) is woefully inadequate for this water. You can treat the water so it's safe from pathogens and it can still be lethal because of the gasoline, mercury, or any one of thousands of other contaminants commonly found in urban Ameedika.

The other problem is that coastal flood waters will also be either salty or brackish which, in itself, renders the water undrinkable.

The best treatment for making flood waters potable is distillation. Reverse osmosis is the next best thing. If you can't treat flood waters using either of these two methods, don't drink it at all!

Bottled water is the best bet but there are logistical limitations on how much you can store.

### ### ### ###

5. How do I store food safely while the power is out?

I posted some information on food preservation and safety during disasters. You can read it here: http://fixitnow.com/?p=6515.

### ### ### ###

6. Epilogue

As we say in Fukushima, "Rots of ruck, GI!"

Samurai Appliance Repair Man
http://fixitnow.com

The Samurai School of Appliantology
http://appliantology.org

Find and Buy Appliance Parts
http://parts.fixitnow.com






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