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Entrance Exam for Appliance Technical Data Sheet Writers

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in General Appliance Repair Wisdom, Humor 19 March 2013 · 485 views
tech sheet

I've had f2 errors where the problem was a thermal fuse. Usually I test probe and fuse (if there is one), and reset ecm if possible before I replace a board on any oven, regardless of manufacturer or error codes.

With regards to tech sheet writers, the following question and response was found on 85 % of their requirement exams...

Posted Image

The problem is, their examiners consider it the correct answer.



Source: GE Oven Mod#JTP95WCW1WW F2 error code


The Samurai's Triumphant Return from the 21st Annual Appliance Service Training Institute (ASTI)

ASTI, training
The eagle has landed back up here in yankee-land. Awesome conference but great to be back in that crisp New Hampshire air.

From Sun Country back to Snow Country... my brain is so full of the latest and greatest appliance info, I've got to relieve the pressure by sharing it with all of you as soon as possible! Stay tuned for pearls to be cast your way soon. Mrs. Samurai is working feverishly at translating my neanderthal scribblings called "notes" into a digital format that would be recognized as Engrish by the Anglo-Ameedikan world. She even wrote up a press release about us that we're submitting to our local newspaper for publi-frikkin-cation. Check it out, yo: http://applianceguru...ru-attends.html

But seriously, mah bruvahs, this ASTI was a fantastic convention-- I can honestly say it was the best one yet! I met lots of great techs, re-connected with old friends and made lots of new ones. And learned a helluva lot! Mucho mega-kudos to all the instructors, my fellow classmates, and the ASTI organizers!

The instructors from the various manufacturers were all top drawer dudes. Of the classes that I took, the best two Top Guns were Nick Webert, Samsung, and Andy Kalter, Whirlpool. These guys kicked total appliance boot-ay and revealed coveted and esoteric pearls of appliantological wisdom as only true Masters in The Craft can do. Diane Hoffman with Reckitt-Benckiser (detergent manufacturer, Finish, Jet Dry, Affresh, and lots of other good stuff) was Best-in-Show for non-appliance manufacturer-but-still-technical-appliance-stuff sessions.

Were you at the recent ASTI with the Samurai? Well, we have special deal for you, GI: http://appliantology...ntologists.html

Even though I was in class all day long, I still had some time off to spend with my peeps. Here are a few clips of some scenes around Disney, including the Coronado Resort where the ASTI was held:

Coronado Resort http://vine.co/v/bwmpP32QTbK

Tres caballeros at El Coronado. http://vine.co/v/bwAFdzprDFV

Some views of The Boardwalk:

http://vine.co/v/bwnbZHFawd3

http://vine.co/v/bwnhelr0HUD


Finding Your Appliance Repair Answers Here at Appliantology

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You've got appliance repair questions, we've got answers. Hundreds of thousands of 'em on all brands and models of major appliances: washers, refrigerators, dryers, dishwashers, ice makers, ovens, ranges, and cooktops. They're all right here at the Samurai Appliance Repair Academy just waiting for you to discover them! Join Samurai Appliance Repair Man as he takes you by the hand and gently walks you through the powerful search features available to you here at the Academy to empower you to find the answers to your burning appliance repair questions.




Explanation of 120v single phase, 240v Split Phase, and 208v 3-phase

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in General Appliance Repair Wisdom 28 February 2013 · 6,672 views
electricity, household and 2 more...
Here is a clear and simple explanation of understanding the differences between 120v single phase, 240v Split Phase, and 208v 3-phase from Academy Fellow Keinokuorma:



There have been multiple threads discussing this electrical topic. Because of increasing demand of this information, I will try to explain this shortly and comprehensively.

On the background there is the three-phased transmission network. This is wired by three separate wires that normally hang adjacently along rows of poles. The voltage between each wire is 11kV, and the waveform graph drawn for each wire's voltage (and current too) are one third of a cycle off each other. That is, there is a 120 degree phase shift between each live wire's waveform, 360 degrees being one full cycle.

The relatively high voltage for the transmission network is selected, because there are two interesting laws about power. First, by principle, electrical power taken by any load can be calculated by multiplying the current flowing through the load, by the voltage over the load. Second, wattage loss at transfer can be calculated by multiplying the transfer line's resistance, by the square (or second power) of the load current. Therefore, for transmitting the same power, if double voltage is used, half the current is needed, and 75% less power is lost on the trip! Let's just say that if they use 11kV instead of 110V for transfer (100x voltage) they need the hundredth of current, and lose only a ten thousandth of power in transit, compared to the idea that it was 110V all through the Great United States of America. The other choice would be using at least one hundred times thicker wire, which is not reasonable at all.

It is not safe to feed this high voltage directly into households. Instead, the voltage from the transmission network will be stepped down by transformers. The usual layout is that single-home buildings have their own stepdown transformers, and larger residential buildings in big cities may have one or a couple larger transformers.

120V: First off, the standard household voltage in North America is 120V AC, 60Hz. Most appliances are designed for this. There can be some variations in the voltage depending on the load and condition of the network. The stepdown transformer has its primary winding wired between two of the three transmission wires.

Due to growing demand of electrical heating (in dryers, ranges, water heaters and sometimes house interior heating) a system has been required that allows usage of 120V designed electronics, and is capable of providing more power for the household. For the same reason that the transfer network doesn't work with such a low voltage, the single 120V circuit can only give so much power without the power loss becoming astronomical. There are two methods used to avoid this while keeping compatibility.

240V or split phase: For small residential buildings, the usual method is to rig up a 240V stepdown transformer (instead of 120V) in which the secondary winding is split into two 120V windings (hence the name "split phase"). The center tap is then grounded and fed to the house as if it was the neutral wire of the old 120V system, and each end is wired as a separate 120V live wire. Their waveforms have a half-cycle offset, or 180 degrees, when measured against the neutral wire. The normal 120V designed machinery does not care which live wire you use for them as long as you connect them between a live and neutral wire. Appliances in the home can be distributed on either live wire to maintain balanced loading, and when heating requires high power, the concerned appliance can be connected to both live wires to operate the heating element, providing 240V for it.

208V: For larger residential buildings and blocks especially in big cities, as well as shopping malls etc, there is a system made out of two or three phases. In these cases, one or more of full three phase stepdown transformers are used to feed power to the building. These transformers have three primary windings, each wired between two of the transmission wires, in a triangular fashion. There are also three secondary windings on such a transformer. Normally these are coupled at one end, the center tap is grounded and fed into the house as the neutral wire, while their other ends are fed into the house as separate live wires. Each live wire reads 120V against the neutral point, and between any pair of live wires, you get the reading of 208V. Then, each home in the building is fed with two or three of these live wires as well as the neutral. The rest happens much like on the split phase. Appliances can be distributed on different live wires, and heating elements will be connected between two live wires.

Now, mostly the differences the customer is concerned with, are just that appliances with 240V designed elements will produce 25% less heat on a 208V system. Some appliances are produced in two models designed for the two systems, some are produced in one model designed for 240V with the power reduction noted in the manual, and some are produced in one model with 208V designed elements as optional spare parts.

If you operate a 240V designed device on a 208V system, often you will not notice much retardation in the performance. It WILL cause your oven, stove or dryer to reach selected temperature slower, and the thermostat will therefore cycle on for longer periods. However, total energy consumption is not greatly affected.

Be aware that mismatching a 208V designed device into a 240V system will cause the element(s) to produce 33% more heat than they are designed for. This will greatly shorten their life span and may cause fire hazard. Temperature in the oven, stove or dryer will probably fluctuate more than what is desirable, and the thermostat will cycle on for short periods. Especially in the case of the dryer, the risk of fire hazard is high.

I will add more pictures when I have drawn some decent ones. Meanwhile, here is a haphazard hand sketch.


Posted Image

Source: http://applianceguru...orum9/9262.html


A Powerful and Portable Information Tool for Professional Appliantologists

Amazon, kindle, kindle fire and 2 more...
If you've been doing appliance repair as a Professional Appliantologist for any length of time, you've probably struggled through something similar to all these situations:

- You're trying to fix an Electrolux range but you can't even figure out how to take it apart so you can troubleshoot.

- You need to put a Whirlpool Duet washer into diagnostic mode but the sleaze bag who worked on it last stole the tech sheet.

- You're working on a temperature control problem in a GE refrigerator and need to look up some schematics and specifications in the service manual, which you don't have with you.

- You're preparing for a job on an LG dishwasher and want to make sure you have the service manual with you but you can't find it in those messy piles of papers and documents you call your filing system.

Wouldn't it be awesome if there was a way of keeping all the technical documents you need during service calls in an inexpensive, compact, light-weight container in which you could quickly find the document you need to fix the problem? In this action-packed, no-holds-barred episode of Samurai TV, I'll show you how I use the Amazon Kindle Fire to easily carry service manuals, bulletins, diagrams, etc., with me on service calls. Using the Kindle Fire, all the tech info I need for a job is right there at my fingertips, easy to retrieve and use.




You can buy a brand new Kindle Fire for $160, a very modest investment for such a powerful information tool. Plus, if you're using it for work, it's tax-deductible!

Amazon also offers a Kindle Fire HD, which has a higher screen resolution and more memory. It's also a lot more expensive. I just use the plain Kindle Fire because, for what I use it for-- carrying technical service manuals on jobs-- it has plenty of storage and the screen resolution is more than adequate for reading manuals. Here's the link to the Amazon Kindle Fire that I use on service calls: http://amzn.to/ZhC8tG






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