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Samurai Appliance Repair Man's Blog



LG Refrigerator Compressor Start Relay Madness

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Refrigerator Repair 13 December 2012 · 2,268 views
LG, refrigerator, start relay and 1 more...
Every now and then, you run into a real CF when you're trying to order a part to fix an appliance. A case in point is trying to get a start relay kit for some models of LG refrigerators, such as the LFX25960ST.


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Grand Master kdog, adept extroidinaire of all things appliance repair, explains how to de-frak this mess:

I had the exact issue with the same model # before - this got me out of it.

The components do not all show up on the literature - at the time I was working for a very large company that had alot of pull with LG and I begged them to contact LG to correct this issue for future folks that get caught.

I did not replace the capacitor as it was not required



One of the prongs on the relay will just be unused - no biggie, I knew this because i was sent to the fridge with a control board that had been ordered and overnighted (very costly delivery) - just to find out there was no issue with the board, can't just look at the lady and say I need to order parts again (no fridge!), rummage around in truck and find replacement by eyeball matchup (no app for that).

I should expand on that a bit - I recognized the particular model of Embraco compressor that I have seen many times in W/P built fridges and went from there.

Relay terminals are all numbered



Here's the link to the start relay you need ==> http://www.repaircli.../4387835/586449


Source: LG Fridge Model# LFX25960ST, Totally Stumped!


Refrigerator Troubleshooting and Repair: Ice, Frost, and Condensation

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Refrigerator Repair 08 December 2012 · 8,499 views
refrigerator, ice, frost and 2 more...
A common problem with refrigerators is the appearance of various forms of water in places where it shouldn’t be. Examples are: water at the bottom of the freezer and dribbling out the door in a side by side refrigerator; fuzzy frost built up on the back wall inside the freezer compartment; moisture on beer bottles and the side walls inside the refrigerator compartment (also called the Beer Compartment); solid slab of ice on the bottom of the freezer compartment.

In each of these examples, we’re dealing with water that’s out of place. Water in a refrigerated space can take on three forms: ice, frost, and condensation. Which of these forms you see, along with where you see it, are important clues to help you zero in on the needed repair.

Condensation problems will appear as “sweating” on jars and bottles and sometimes even on the sidewall in the refrigerator compartment. Condensation is caused by water vapor condensing into a liquid as it hits the cold surfaces inside the refrigerator. When you see this, it means outside, humid air is getting inside the refrigerated compartments when and where it shouldn’t. So, you’re looking for bad gaskets, doors not closing properly, or doors being left open from carelessness.

Ice refers to liquid water that froze into a solid. This sounds obvious but it’s an important distinction from frost, also known as rime ice, that fuzzy looking stuff that is formed when water vapor condenses directly into a solid. The important point here is that ice and frost are the effects of two completely different underlying causes.

If you see smooth or solid ice in a freezer, then you know you’re really looking for liquid water in places where it shouldn’t be (that ended up freezing): clogged condensate drain in the drip trough below the evaporator coil; ice maker fill tube leaking or out of place; ice maker mold leaking.

If you see frost or rime ice in a freezer, then you know you’re really looking for water vapor that’s getting into the compartment. How does water vapor get into a refrigerator? It comes in with the outside air. In most cases when you see frost in a freezer, you’re looking for an air leak: bad door gaskets or doors not closing all the way. This video shows an extreme example of rime ice all over the contents inside a freezer:



Sometimes, you’ll see both ice and frost appearing together in a freezer which can make diagnosis tricky. In this video, I walk you through an example of such a case and I explain the failure sequence:




A special (but common) case for diagnosing frost in a freezer is when you see frost accumulated on the evaporator coil or back wall inside the freezer that covers the evaporator coil. This indicates a defrost system failure (defrost terminator stuck open, burned out defrost heater, bad defrost timer (on older units) or adaptive defrost control (ADC) board).

The reason rime ice forms on the evaporator coil in the first place is because the coil operates at a temperature of -20F. At that temperature, water vapor that contacts the coil will condense and freeze directly into a solid, forming rime ice. Every few hours the defrost system should kick in and melt that ice, because if it’s allowed to accumulate it will eventually act as an insulator, preventing the air from contacting the evaporator coils and getting cold. The resulting problem would first be seen as a warm refrigerator compartment and, if allowed to continue, eventually the freezer will also get warmer than normal (normal = 0F). Rime ice accumulated on the inside of the back wall in the freezer will often be seen at this point.

This melted rime ice has a special name: condensate. (Not to be confused with condensation, although the words are similar, they arise from two different causes.) Condensate refers to the water that gets melted off the evaporator coil in the freezer compartment during the defrost cycle. This condensate drips onto the condensate drip trough below the evaporator coil and drains out the condensate drain– a hole in the condensate drip trough– through a tube to the drain pan placed down by the compressor where it eventually evaporates due to the combined action of the compressor heat and condenser fan motor.

This video shows a freezer with extreme rime ice buildup on the back wall inside the freezer due to a defrost system failure:



If you need expert, interactive help in troubleshooting and repairing your refrigerator and service manuals, become an Apprentice here at the Appliantology Academy ==> http://apprentice.appliantology.org/

Subscribe to our FREE, award-winning newsletter, Appliantology: The Oracle of Appliance Enlightenment==> http://newsletter.fixitnow.com and download your free report on appliance brand recommendations! Every issue is jam-packed with appliance repair tips and inside information direct from the Samurai’s fingertips to your engorged and tingling eyeballs.


Using Temperature Data Loggers to Solve Mysterious Refrigerator Temperature Problems

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Repair Videos, Refrigerator Repair 17 October 2012 · 1,297 views
refrigerator, temperature and 3 more...

 

 

As professional Appliantologists, we've all run into situations where we realized that we needed a way to log temperature data inside a refrigerator for at least 24 hours to get a clear picture of what's going on inside that box.  A couple of examples are:

 
Customer complains of warm temperatures in the beer compartment of her Maytag side-by-side refrigerator but says that the freezer compartment is fine (and we know how accurate customer temperature measurements are... NOT!).  You arrive and measure the freezer temperature using your infrared temperature gun and get readings that vary from +5F to +12F.  Marginal temperatures for a freezer but was that because it was just coming out of a defrost or off-cycle?  Was the door recently opened just before you got there?  You don't know and all you have is the one data point: the measurement you just made.  Wouldn't it help your diagnosis if you could put a data logger inside the freezer for a day or so and then look at a graph of the actual temperature measurements inside that freezer over time?  
 
Customer complains that the freezer temperature in her GE built-in refrigerator fluctuates over time from 5F to 10F to 20F and then back to hard freeze.  You maybe even verified this yourself (if you spent enough time there to do this).  But how much time in a typical service call day do you have to babysit freezer temperatures?  And you still wouldn't be able to gather enough temperature-time data points to discern whether or not there's a pattern to the fluctuations which could then be correlated to some other process in the refrigerator (defrost cycles, compressor cycles, etc.).  Even seeing that there is no pattern, that the fluctuations are random, is also helpful because it could indicate something as simple as the door not being closed all the way (hinge adjustment issue?). 
 
 
See what I be sayin', mah bruvah?  In cases like these (and many others-- I'm sure you can think of several that you've been on), you just gotsta be able to look at the temperature inside the compartment over an extended period of time.  Enter the Supco LT2 LOGiT Dual Channel Temperature Data Logger:
 
 

Which needs the Supco LOGiT software package to enable it to connect to your Windows PC to set it up and download the data:

 
 

...and it all works AWESOMELY! Here's a video I made showing you how to set up and use the LT2 and the type of temperature profile graph it generates:

 
 

Since I am a Mac user who (until recently) didn't own a Windows PC, the above two items necessitated the purchase of my first Windows PC in over seven years!  Turns out this was not as expensive a proposition as it sounds.  

 

I clicked on over to my favorite computer gear store, Tigerdirect.com, and picked up this refurbished Lenovo Windows 7 notebook computer for less than $300, including shipping!




Troubleshooting a Dead GE Profile Refrigerator

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Refrigerator Repair 06 October 2012 · 1,547 views
GE, profile, refrigerator and 1 more...
If you're working on one of these GE Profile refrigerators with the knob controls in the fresh food compartment and it's DOA, this flowchart can help plan your attack:

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And here are the part links to the most likely parts you'll need:

Encoder Board:
click on picture
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Muthaboard:
click on picture
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Sensor:
click on picture
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Appliantology Newsletter: Secret Refrigerator Repair Tricks


 

Appliantology Newsletter
Secret Refrigerator Repair Tricks
Early-July 2012
Trade Secrets
Okay, before I divulge protected trade secrets for fixing refrigerators, I have to ask for your solemn vow of silence.  Divulging this information to the profane can get me in big trouble with my Brethren in The Craft.  I could get thrown out of the International Appliance Repair Guild!  So, please, if you feel like sharing these secrets with someone, do so by forwarding them this entire newletter.  That way, nothing can get taken out of context that might get me trouble with The Brethren.  Domo!
Refrigerator Warming Up in Both Compartments and No Frost on the Back Wall Inside the Freezer?
This will be one of four things:
1. Dirty condenser (preventable)
2. Burned out compressor start relay (very fixable)
3. Bad or lazy condenser fan motor (very fixable)
4. Bad compressor or sealed system ("freon") leak (terminal event: go shopping)
As indicated, the first three causes are very fixable, even preventable.  But the fourth one is a 4th Down Time to Punt event.  That's because EPA's DuPont regulations have made doing sealed system work so expensive that it's not cost-effective to do it on most refrigerators... unless you paid so much for the box that you're married to it (a la Sub-Zero). So, lots of easily-repairable refrigerators choking up the landfills today.

Be that as it may, let's talk about the first three things that we can do something about...
Dirty Condenser
A dirty condenser will make any refrigerator warm up.  Even the mighty Sub-Zero is not immune from a dirty condenser's refrigerator-killing effects.  Check this out, this could be you:

Burned Out Compressor Start Relay / Bad or Lazy Condenser Fan Motor
I grouped these two things together because they can and do occur together but most people, including most technicians, don't catch this.  But you, dear reader, are now privvy to one to the Samurai's most cherished repair tricks...

And Hey! ...
I frequently upload new videos to my YouTube channel. Be sure to subscribe so you can check 'em out as soon as they're uploaded: Samurai's YouTube Channel

You can find whatever appliance part you need through the parts search box at Fixitnow.com or Appliantology.org.  No harm in buying and trying with our 365-day, no-hassle return policy, even on electrical parts that were installed!

Samurai Appliance Repair Man, Fixitnow.com
 







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