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Whirlpool Direct Spark Ignition (DSI) System Monitoring and Lockout Control Scheme

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Oven-Range-Stove Repair 30 May 2014 · 498 views
Whirlpool, DSI, monitoring and 1 more...

DSI Monitoring System:
When power is applied to the range, a safety delay of 40 seconds takes place before the direct spark ignition control becomes operational. The 40 second delay allows any unused gas inside the oven cavity to dissipate before a spark is activated. When the Bake or Broil operation is activated, the direct spark ignition control initiates an “internal self-test” and “flame safety check.” The flame safety check takes place anytime there is a flame present at either oven burner.

The self-test checks both solenoids on the gas distribution valve to verify that they are properly connected. If they are not, the control will turn the oven off, or lock it out. If the test is successful, the control will then open the appropriate valve, and initiate sparking at the
burner ignitor. Both the bake and broil ignitors spark simultaneously. Sparking will not occur until the gas distribution valve opens.

Once the gas has ignited, the “flame safety circuit” will monitor the flame at the burner to make sure it is present. If a flame is not present at the burner:
a)The control will allow the ignitor to spark for 4 seconds.
b)A 40 second delay to dissipate any unused gas inside the oven will occur.
The ignition attempt will occur three times. If the burner does not ignite after the three attempts, the system will “lockout”

Lockout:
The control will perform an oven system lockout if:
a) Any of the self-test checks fail.
B) The oven fails to ignite after three ignition attempts.

c) A flame is present within the oven for more than 10 seconds after the gas valve is off.
d)The flame is unexpectedly lost for any reason after being established.

NOTE:
If this occurs, a lockout condition will occur after 30 seconds with no attempt to reignite.
During the lockout, the gas distribution valve and ignition are turned off. All lockouts can be reset by pressing the OFF/Cancel keypad on the Electronic Oven Control.

NOTE: There will be no indication on the electronic oven control display showing a lockout condition.



Source: Whirlpool SF362LXSB Gas Oven Keeps Shutting Off


Gas range goes BOOM! after a particular stove burner is lit

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Oven-Range-Stove Repair 18 December 2013 · 1,809 views
gas, range, leak, boom, explosion and 2 more...
In this adventure into appliance dysfunction, the customer called me with a scary problem with her gas range. After she would fire up the left-front (LF) cooktop burner and it was on for less than a minute, a big flash-boom would erupt from underneath the burners. I reproduced the problem when I was there and it was a pretty impressive explosion! I wish I had gotten video of it but thought better of repeating it.

I knew I was dealing with a gas leak and had to get to the burner gas supply tubes to leak check them. I disassembled the range cooktop so I could get a look underneath the burners. Turns out this leak didn't even need gas bubble leak-check solution to find (click the pics for larger view):

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That's the aluminum gas supply tubing for the LF burner. With a break like that, it's amazing that it was sending any gas at all to the burner. It was still supplying the burner with gas albeit at a reduced rate so the flames were more yellow than the other burners. The rest of the gas was flooding the compartment underneath the burners until it reached the Lower Explosive Limit (LEL) concentration for propane (which is 2.1% by volume, in case you were curious). Then the propane was in high enough concentration that it ignited from the open flame on the burner.

Range go BOOM!
Pants go brown.

So the next question is: How did this happen? Metal tubing that's not pressurized does not just spontaneously rupture.

Turns out the customer had been releasing the cooktop clips and lifting the top panel of the range without first unscrewing the burners. She would do this periodically to clean out the copious amounts of mouse poopy:

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Every time she did this, however, she was flexing all the gas burner supply tubes which finally induced fatigue failure in the tube for the LF burner.

Why was the LF burner tube the first (and only, so far) to fail? Because it is the shortest tube. The other tubes, being longer, had more flex and were more forgiving.

So where are these mysterious burner screws that have to be removed? In this particular range (older GE), each burner has three mounting screws that need to be removed to release the burner base from the bottom of the cooktop panel. This way the tubing is not flexed when the cooktop is raised for cleaning or service.

What invariably happens with this design is that the mounting screws for the most-used burner (usually the RF burner for right-handed people) get rusted out like this:

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Then either the head breaks off when you try to remove them or the head simply rounds out when you try to unscrew them. It's common to have to drill the screws out when this happens, which you can see in the photo above.

Moral of the story: Don't go messing with your appliances unless you know what you don't know! Just because you can undo some clips and take something apart doesn't mean you should, because there could be consequences that aren't even on your radar screen. Use the forums at The Appliantology Academy to get advice from the experts before you start mucking about with your appliances!

When dealing with gas appliances, don't assume anything: know what you don't know.


Wall Oven Wiring Fail

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Oven-Range-Stove Repair 14 December 2013 · 1,572 views
wall oven, wiring
I went to remove a wall oven today and ran into a little problem. Can you find it?

Posted Image


I run into this kind of problem all the time up here in the backwoods of New Hampster. It's an endemic problem with electricians and handymen not bothering to read the installation instructions. For the record, this installation fail was done by a licensed electrician. Kind of a wake up call for the whole licensing racket, isn't it? Having a "licensed" electrician is still no guarantee that he knows what in the hell he is doing or is capable of reading simple installation instructions.

In case you're interested, you can read the manufacturer's installation instructions yourself here: http://manuals.frigi...n/318206002.pdf

BTW, those specs are typical for all manufacturers.

Bottom Line with any wall oven installation: You need to have enough slack in the power wire conduit to be able to remove the wall oven from its compartment.


Soot: A Clear and Present Danger in your Gas Oven

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Oven-Range-Stove Repair 06 December 2013 · 1,851 views
gas, oven, range, soot and 2 more...
I was at a service call on gas range the other day for an oven that wouldn't bake or broil. The cause turned out to be a bad range control board. Nothing unusual about that. The astonishing thing with this range was the inside of the oven cell-- all the surfaces inside were coated with a thick layer of soot (click the images for a larger view):

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This is NOT a normal condition in any gas range. If you see soot accumulated on your oven cell walls, even a little, STOP USING IT AND GET IT CHECKED OUT!

Soot is a product of incomplete combustion. So is Carbon Monoxide (CO), dubbed "the silent killer" because it is odorless and kills by displacing oxygen in your blood, making you sleepy and, in high enough concentrations, can make you take that final dirt nap. We've all heard the stories of people dying in their homes from CO poisoning. Improperly adjusted gas appliances, like the oven shown in the photos above, is one of the more common ways this happens.

A standard practice in the appliance industry is that all gas appliances, ranges, ovens, dryers, etc., come ready to burn natural gas. If you're going to use propane (also abbreviated LP for "liquid propane"), you have to convert the gas system in the appliance to safely burn it without producing soot or unsafe levels of CO.

Since propane burns hotter than natural gas (2,500 Btu/cu ft for propane vs. 1,030 Btu/cu ft for natural gas), it needs more air to make a "complete" (or at least safe and soot-free) combustion. If the air-fuel ratio (AFR) is too low (too much fuel or "too rich" in automobile terms), you'll create soot and unsafe levels of CO. If you're interested in some numbers on the AFR for natural gas and propane, start here.

While no combustion is 100% complete, you can still get close enough to prevent soot formation and keep CO production to safe levels.

The range in this service call is a Kenmore (Frigidaire-built) range that was purchased from a famous, nationwide retail chain (I'll give you one guess; hint: it's a Kenmore). This range, like all gas appliances, came ready to burn natural gas and needed to be converted for use with propane.

The customer paid the retailer for the conversion but it wasn't done properly. They converted the gas burners on the cooktop correctly by replacing the gas metering spuds for each burner with the smaller diameter spuds sized for propane. But they completely neglected to convert either of the gas burners in the oven (bake and broil). Behold (click the images for a larger view):


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To make matters even worse, when the customer called the retailer's customer service department to complain about the soot in the oven, they advised her to run the self clean feature which successfully produced copious amounts of soot and, at the 900F temperatures reached in the oven cell during self clean, baked the soot onto the oven walls. The soot will never come out. This range is only three years old and the oven is effectively ruined.

So how is the strange and mysterious conversion process done in gas ranges? It's really not a mystical experience at all. It's as simple as following the instructions and installing a few pieces that all manufacturers provide for this very purpose. For example, here is an official conversion instruction sheet that Frigidaire includes with the conversion kits for its ranges. GE's conversion instruction sheet has similar information but I think it's a little more comprehensive and easy-to-follow (you'll need to be an Appliantology Apprentice to download it).







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