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Featured

Team Samurai Heading off to the Old Country

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man in Samurai Appliance Repair Man's Blog, 26 May 2015 · 149 views
samurai incarnate, vacation and 1 more...

Well, mah Bruvahs, Mrs. Samurai finally convinced me that we needed to take a vacation. It's been decades since we've taken a true vacation that wasn't a business trip in disguise.

The past couple of years have been especially intense and transformative ones for Team Samurai (me, Mrs. Samurai, and our two sons Stephen and Sam) with the creation and development of the Samurai Tech Academy. I know I make all this look easy and it seems like one day I just whipped out MasterSamuraiTech.com like, "Oh, look what I just pulled outta my ass."

But designing the Academy and creating all the content for it was probably the toughest project I've ever undertaken. The comprehensive, preeminent training courses at the Samurai Tech Academy and the website itself represents tens of thousands of hours of intense focus by the whole team. The only other thing I've ever done that comes close in terms of sustained project focus was getting my Master's degree in Environmental Engineering and writing my Master's thesis-- and I was a lot younger, smarter, and better looking then.

These past few years have been so intense that it changed my whole lifestyle for the worse. That's okay-- you have to do that sometimes to get shit done. Short term sacrifice, long term gain and all that. Plus, I'm extremely proud of the Academy and all of the effort from Team Samurai. But sustaining that kind of lifestyle is also a great way to die early. I'm 55 years old. According to insurance company death statistics, the 50's are death alley for men. If a man is going to drop dead, he'll generally do it in his 50's. That's exactly where I was headed if I kept up the lifestyle of the past few years.

So, I'm going to use this trip to make a lifestyle change, too. For example, I haven't been hiking in the White Mountains in years and certainly not as a lifestyle anymore. That, my friends, will change. When I get back, there's gonna be less work, a more balanced life, and many, many sweaty, blissful hours spent bagging peaks with the Oz Man in New Hampshire's White Mountains.

So with the release of two new courses at the Samurai Tech Academy, the timing is perfect for Team Samurai to fly off Ireland-- the "Old Country" as the referred to by the Irish diaspora-- for a ten day vacation. I'll do the obligatory beer drinking and pub diving thing but hopefully get in some hiking, too. Wifi is ubiquitous in Ireland so I'll still be checking in here at Appliantology and checking/replying to email.

Well, mah bruvahs, I leave you with a non-traditional Irish blessing from the inimitable and iconoclastic Ween:



Aye aye aye, sharpen your boot, and bludgeon your eye
Aye aye aye, the blarney stone brings a tear to me eye



Featured

How to find documentation for Kenmore Refrigerators

Posted by DurhamAppliance in DurhamAppliance's Blog, 15 May 2015 · 270 views

Finding documentation for Kenmore appliances can be challenging at times. If you are lucky, you may locate it in our download section. When searching, try searching with the decimal, without the decimal, removing the decimal and numbers in front of it and replace them with an "*" while also replacing the last few letters with an "*". See Searching for technical documents http://appliantology...appliantology/.

But usually, Kenmore's are a pita to find info. You have to somehow cross reference the model to the manufactures compatible model.

Sometimes if you find the part number for the mainboard or user interface, you can cross reference the part to a model where the documentation is easier to find. Some manufacturers do make it easy. For instance

Frigidaire made Kenmores ... just look it up on Frigidaire's site but you must include the decimal.You will get a tech sheet but to find a full manual, check out my Frigidaire survival kit blog http://appliantology...r-survival-kit/

LG is also easy.. just use the first five digits after the decimal and look it up on LG's tech assist site.

Whirlpool made? Good luck with that....

Samsung? . well....


look up the model at Searspartsdirect... try to cross reference the mainboard using appliance parts pros (full site) ... but it only brings up other Kenmore models...damn... that means we got to do our own cross-referencing. so let's play Sherlock Holmes....

While we are already looking at it, let's grab a screenshot of the mainboard to compare with other samsung models.

On Sears, you see this fridge is a sxs..

Samsung refrigerator model numbers start with R (Refrigerator)then an S for sxs or f (french door) b (bottom mount) M (four door... maybe it may stand for Multiple door but I call them Mutha@#&fs!)

So far we have RS

If it has a three way valve then the next letter will be a G otherwise a number. So let's check out the machine compartment on the Sears' diagram and we see a 3 way stepper valve ... great! This means there are only a couple of Samsung models to compare boards with.

So far we have RSG

Check my Dropbox or Appliantology's library for models beginning with RSG (use wildcard search "rsg*")

And there are two models...let's look at the fast track for the first one... model RSG257AA .... hmmm.. i dunno.... they look sort of different... well the pictures' orientation are different... color seems off... but examining them closely... counting connectors... ah ha! it's the same board. There you have it cross referenced to an RSG257AA. Elementary, my dear Watson... uh... Bro. Patricio

Now , I did not spend all this time and trouble so I could ask you out on a date. Copy this post for future reference 'cause next time you have a Kenmore - Samsung fridge cross reference manual request and you don't attempt to obtain it yourself first and I have to go through all this again... well, we know how that's gonna turn out... lol

http://appliantology...hooting-manual/

Source: Kenmore Refrigerator (Samsung) 401.41003010

How to test motor speeds (RPM)

Posted by tpoindexter in tpoindexter's Blog, 13 May 2015 · 264 views
RPM, speed, How fast

I was talking with another tech this morning about checking RPM. this brought up the subject of strobes. As we were
discussing strobes it occurred to me someone had probably created an app with RPM already. Shazaaam!!! :woot:

Here's a app that will allow you to test RPM on fans. You can also test motor rpm, if, you place a mark on the shaft.
https://itunes.apple...d708094321?mt=8

To check fan speed just dial it in till the fan appears to be not moving at all. That'll give you your RPM.
Same with a motor if you mark the shaft. When the mark appears to no longer be moving you've got the RPM.

I'm not really sure if this is the correct use of this Blog thingy, but, bet I'll find out sure enough!! Yeeehaw!!!

Huh... I hope I wasn't the last person on earth to figure this out!

Featured

The Anatomy of a Miele dishwasher Waterproof System

Posted by LI-NY Tech in LI-NY Tech's Blog, 30 April 2015 · 338 views

Miele produces the best dishwashers on the market today. They are high end machines...very quiet, they wash well and last many years beyond the life span of a lesser quality brand. However, like all machines they do break down. One of the most common failures to occur on a Miele dishwasher is the Water Proof System (WPS). That's that mysterious grey box under your sink. What is that thing?

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The WPS is a dual water inlet valve. The redundancy ensures that if one valve fails to close the other will, greatly reducing the chance of flooding your kitchen. That brass part on the left attaches to the house plumbing, the box contains the two solenoids and the gray tube contains the water intake hose, the wiring and outer sleeve. When the electronic calls for water the solenoids open and the water flows through the intake hose and into the dishwasher.

The outer sleeve acts a protection against leaks. If the solenoids leak the water will flow along the outer sleeve and into the drip tray in the base of the dishwasher. When enough water accumulates the float switch will be activated and the water intake will stop. The drain pump will also be activated until the machine is unplugged or the water is no longer present in the drip tray.

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The inlet to the WPS contains a filter and a restrictor. The filter stops large debris from entering the system and the restrictor ensures correct water pressure. The filters often get clogged and can be easily cleaned.

Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image


The Miele dishwasher service manual states:

The WaterProof System (WPS) consists of a number of interdependent safety features to provide protection against water leakage.
1. Protection against solenoid valve leakage: Each water intake is controlled by an inlet valve. If this valve cannot close properly due to some defect or blockage by a foreign object, a second inlet valve ensures that the water supply is shut off.
2. Protection against water intake hose leakage: If a leakage occurs, water flows along an outer hose sleeve surrounding the intake hose to the drip pan. Here a float switch then acts to switch off a microswitch which closes the inlet valves to cut off the water supply.

3. Protection against dishwasher overflow: If some defect has caused the water level in the appliance to rise so that it overflows into the drip pan, and the water quantity sensor has also failed, the float switch is activated. This switches off a microswitch which closes the inlet valves to cut off the water supply. At the same time the drain pump is activated.
4. Protection against drain pump failure or blocked drain path: In this case the water level in the appliance rises until it overflows into the drip pan where the float switch is activated. This switches off a microswitch which closes the inlet valves to cut off the water supply.


Thanks for reading.
David
RD Appliance Service, Corp.
http://www.rdapplianceservice.com
RD Appliance Blog


Featured

Bosch Schematic Basics

Posted by Applianceman97 in applianceman97's Blog, 29 April 2015 · 320 views

This is mainly for anybody that is new to working on Bosch products. Their schematics can be intimidating. Here is how decode them.




Part deception

Posted by MicaBay in MicaBay's Semi Knowlegable Blog, 21 April 2015 · 372 views
part not what it seems

Recently, I needed to put two infinite burner switches in a Frigidaire slide in range. These switches were for the two large burners. Installed them, and did the simple but basic tests. Both burners now working, customer is happy, :blinky: , I'm happy. I collect my beer :pint1: money for the day and off to other adventures.

Customer calls back next day and not so happy. One burner doesn't get hot enough to hardly boil water. Okay I said, see you later today? Yes. Get out to location and here is what I discovered.... see the pictures below.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Did you see it? I almost didn't. Of course the story above is highly plausable but totally fake, because, I saw it before installation of said part. Moral is, always inspect your parts before installing them. One of the switches must have fallen off the assembly line and been packaged with the wrong part number... At the Factory!! Say it aint so, a manufacture making a part mistake?!!? :woot: :woot:

This job can kill you. Be careful and check for voltage if you have an electrical complaint.

Posted by TheApplianceTechnician in TheApplianceTechnician's Blog, 17 April 2015 · 441 views
electrical problem and 4 more...

From now on potential electrical issues will be a big red flag.

Get into the habit of checking a unit’s frame to a trusted ground before you start working on anything with a power related issue.

I went out on this call expecting something to be wrong with the refrigerator and so as usual I start the standard diagnostic process. It was plugged into a standard outlet and not a gfi so I automatically rule out nuisance trips from being the culprit. I opened the door, felt the hot gas lines, listened to the fans, checked the temps in the freezer and the refrigerator, cycled the icemaker, put the unit into defrost and heard the heaters kick on and start sizzling. Everything seemed to be normal and working as expected.

At this point I figured a mouse may have gotten into a wire or the icemaker line and I really needed to check the back compartment out anyway so I pulled it out to take a look. Again everything looked normal, nothing unusual. I unplugged the unit, checked for continuity between neutral and l1, ground and l1 and again nothing unusual. I plugged the refrigerator back into the outlet and needed to roll it forward a little so I pushed the bare metal back with my hand forward and in doing so my knee hit the copper line coming out of the wall. This is where I simultaneously found the problem and I took 120 volts straight through the chest, violent shaking the whole bit. It hurt like hell and left me scared to touch the damn thing again, but I went back to work.

I checked the outlet and it was wired backwards (hot and neutral reversed) but that's not really that uncommon for a house that's 20+ years old around here. I checked ground to neutral and I got some really big fluctuations in resistance that were sometimes unreadable by my fluke meter so I knew something was going on but not sure exactly what. So I checked ground to the copper pipe. 120 volts. I plugged the refrigerator into a gfi outlet that had a microwave on it and turned off the breaker to the refrigerator and got her in contact with an electrician I know and trust. He went out and a few days later I spoke with the customer again and she told me that the electrician said I was really lucky so I had to call and speak with him about it. I called him and he told me that the ground wire had shorted out to the hot line, energizing everything. I asked him how that was possible without tripping the breaker and he said that the outlet didn't return to ground, that someone had crawled under the house and rigged up the electrical line at some point probably removing the ground and that something chewed the wires shorting the ground and the hot line. The lady said she had no knowledge of it and it must have been done before she bought the house.

I'm making the assumption that something had chewed the wire shorting the rigged up ungrounded ground wire to the hot line. I still don't understand completely what happened but I know I got the shit shocked out of me and if I would have had a hand hold on something I may have been killed, but I wasn't thankfully. It still scares me though. This woman was old and frail and if she would have touched the refrigerator and the sink or the microwave anything to a good ground it probably would have killed her. Be careful with electricity. I've been shocked many times but never like that. 120 volts are extremely powerful. We tend to get complacent with it.

Featured

Dishwasher Pain In The Hose

Posted by Patricio in Patricio's Blog, 16 December 2014 · 505 views
Drain Issues

Dishwashers can be a pain to diagnose correctly. A recent example is a Samsung DMT400 RHS that gave me a fit with the delicate blinking light corresponding to a drain problem. Used the fast tract for diagnostics.

Reset control board (Unplug/Replug unit), put into diagnostics & went thru cycles with drain cycle toward end of service mode. Unit drained but flow was weak, so I inspected disposal inlet & drain hose for blockage which was first problem to inspect on Fast Tract. No restrictions found, next on list was drain pump.

The ohms found on the pump were below specifications so I suspected pump was weak & shaft possibly seizing. Replaced pump, flow was improved, but the flow still seemed weak. Dishwasher worked for a few loads then shut down again with the delicate led blinking. Posted question what am I missing & got feed back of blocked drain hose and case sensor which is next on list of problems.

Replaced case sensor on this unit over a year ago for filling issue, did not think that it was the culprit although there was sediment building in the assembly.

I replaced the water sensing case assembly as a parts changer not knowing how much millivolts to check for at the board. Also rechecked drain hose & blew thru drain hose from case brake back thru pump & into tub. No restrictions felt there, could hear the tub water gurgling. Reinstalled machine & babysitted cycle (watching paint dry) completed wash cycle & drained with what I perceived as weak flow, but drain it did with no problem. Two days later another call for incomplete cycle. What is going on? Bad PCB board which was last thing in problem list.

Now I am really determined, set aside 3 hours to focus completely on the machine. One thing I did not do was check harness connections so that was in the battle plan. Arrived reset board, started normal cycle, pump did initial drain with very little water in sump, filled, & washed ((watching paint dry again but I viewed posts on Appliantology in the process).

Finally began drain cycle. With hose in bucket the flow was sputtering Knew for sure I had a blockage problem. I pulled main drain hose off took it outside & run high pressure garden hose water, passed with flying colors. Next I pulled hose from pump to case brake, applied water pressure & that is when the culprit was dislodged. What appeared to be a couple of small feet that are attached to some cutting boards.

Now apparent the intermittent problem was these feet caught in the bend of the drain hose that would pivot allowing water to flow at a reduced rate & then turn enough to plug the gap allowing very little flow thus causing the drain cycle to time out before completely emptying the sump.

Moral of this story if having a intermittent drainage problem that shuts down a dishwasher, Samsung in particular, eliminate all drain hoses as a possibility of blockage by putting high pressure(60+ psi) water thru them with an outside garden hose.


​Link to forum topic:
http://appliantology...r-dmt400rhsxaa/

Coconut Lime Chicken Soup

Posted by Mrs. Samurai in Mrs. Samurai's Kitchen, 10 November 2013 · 1,305 views

Here's a Thai-inspired chicken soup that is easy to make and bursting with flavor! It's healthy comfort food with an Asian twist.

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Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil, ghee, or butter
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1-2 pounds uncooked chicken breast, diced
  • 1 inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and chopped fine
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced, divided
  • 1 quart chicken broth (I use either homemade or a box of low sodium, no added MSG.)
  • 1 can coconut milk (look for this in the Asian/Thai section of the grocery store. I prefer regular, not "lite".)
  • 1 lime, juiced, divided
  • ¼ tsp. red pepper flakes
  • 4 scallions, chopped
  • ½ bunch cilantro, chopped
  • salt, to taste
  • optional: Thai fish sauce, cooked rice
Directions

Heat a soup pot over medium high heat, then add the coconut oil. Saute the onions with a little salt for a few minutes, then add the chicken chunks with a little more salt. Cook, stirring frequently, until chicken is just cooked through. Add the ginger and half of the garlic towards the end of this.

Stir in the broth and bring to a boil, then stir in the coconut milk, half of the lime juice, and the red pepper flakes. Reduce the heat to low and simmer covered for at least 15 minutes (longer is fine, too).

Turn off the heat, and add salt to taste (depends on the amount in your chicken broth). Stir in the rest of the garlic, the scallions, and most of the cilantro (leave a little aside for topping individual bowls). Add the rest of the lime juice if desired. Cover and let sit off-heat for 5 to 10 minutes, then serve.

Great served over rice. Add a few drops of fish sauce to your serving to knock the flavor out of the park!


From: Amana NED7200TW Dryer no heat, problem with cycling thermostat?

Posted by kdog in kdog's Blog, 16 March 2012 · 3,575 views

[Yes, I did reset the breaker and checked the voltages. Here's the wiring diagram:
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Source: Amana NED7200TW Dryer no heat, problem with cycling thermostat?



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