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expat

Defrost cycle frequency

34 posts in this topic

[user=167]expat[/user] wrote:

Another question from the idea that the problem might be moisture in the system causing an ice blockage. If that was the case, would you all expect that ice would form on every defrost cycle or just randomly?

The theoretical ice plug I was referring to would forum inside the sealed system and would not be visible.

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[user=1]Samurai Appliance Repair Man[/user] wrote:

The theoretical ice plug I was referring to would forum inside the sealed system and would not be visible.

I realize that. I did not ask if it would be visible, but if would form every time the unit went into defrost cycle or just randomly.

Thanks,

Peter

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The formation of the ice plug in the sealed system would be completely unrelated to the defrost cycle. If the plug were to, perchance, occur just prior to the defrost cycle, it would probably melt during the defrost cycle, as the evaporator warmed up, and I'd expect that you would have normal refrigeration for a while after the defrost cycle. But the mechanism of its formation is completely unrelated to the defrost cycle.

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[user=167]expat[/user] wrote:

Another question from the idea that the problem might be moisture in the system causing an ice blockage. If that was the case, would you all expect that ice would form on every defrost cycle or just randomly?

Could you give us your thought/comment/answer on your question this time?;)

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Considering the minute amount of refrigerant in a domestic refrigerator and the fact that it is hermetically sealed i doubt the moisture problem. One fact is if it does have a moisture problem and an overheating problem then you will soon have a compressor problem due to the acid build up caused from the flurocarbons in the refrigerant, the hydrogen in the moisture and the heat. All add up to hydroflouric acid. It eats the insulation on the motor windings in the compressor and they short out. The dreaded compressor burn out. Hard to clean this up in a small cap tube system such as the home refrigerator.

But I don't think thats the problem. A quick check is to monitor the cap tube. As the "ice plug" forms, the outside of the narrow cap tube will start to form frost on it due to the expansion of the gas refrigerant caused by the pressure drop of the inside narrowing of tube. Refrigeration 101(no charge).

Your problem is a lot like mine. My GE SxS refrigerator gets to a butter dripping 110°F. I replaced the cheapest part the defrost switch and the main PC board. I still have the problem. I can't find a schematic or a sequence of operation for the damn thing without spending a fortune!

Can anybody help?

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Jurban, you are starting a new topic on the end of a 6 month old discussion.  If you could please start a new topic, include your brand, model and serial and state your problem in more detail please...;)

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Jurban,

I thought ice in the system was a long shot and there has been no indication of that over time. I've decided to live with the fridge the way it is because of the lack of qualified repairmen here like the wonderful people on this forum.

Thanks for your thoughts on this and I hope you get your appliance working okay.

Peter

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Thanks Peter,

I did find the problem but not until after I replaced the motherboard. That by the way wasn't the problem.

By chance I walked into the kitchen the other night, the lights were off and I could see a faint light comming from the fresh food side of the refrigerator around the gasket. Hmmm I thought. The GE mother boards adaptive defrost uses the door switch to determine use and subsequently defrost frequency and duration. I duct taped the switch, got a warm beer and went to bed. Next morning the beer was a frosty 38°F(a little too cold for my liking) and the frig has been running fine ever since the duct tape.

I did realign the door so the switch would compress fully when it was shut and now I have a spare motherboard. From what I have read on this forum about these GEs it's probably a good thing.

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Sorry Pegi! I'm new and was searching past topics to see if I could find a solution to my problem before I presented perhaps a past solved scenario.

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