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Defrost cycle frequency


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33 replies to this topic

#21 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 12 April 2005 - 05:29 PM

[user=216]GuidofromCT[/user] wrote:

More food in freezer translates to less warming during defrost.


Ahso deska nani kudesi! I think this explain those freakishly high defrost temps from the GE Artica manual-- those measurements where probably made on an empty fridge.

Also, I don't think Expat's Mitsubishi has adaptive defrost so there won't be a pre-chill cycle, for example.

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#22 The Seven

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Posted 12 April 2005 - 05:58 PM

[user=1]Samurai Appliance Repair Man[/user] wrote:

Ahso deska nani kudesi! I think this explain those freakishly high defrost temps from the GE Artica manual-- those measurements where probably made on an empty fridge.


At last we got it! Samurai :D

Not every adaptive defrost control include "Pre-chill".

Those using all electronic temp sensors (refrigerator termistor, freezer thermistor and evaporator thermistor) would include "Pre-chill", e.g GE_Arctica_SxS fridge.

Those using conventional cold-controls and defrost termimators do not include "Pre-chill", eg most Maytag, Whirlpool and Amana.


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#23 expat

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 01:40 AM

[user=216]GuidofromCT[/user] wrote:

Is the freezer full??? More food in freezer translates to less warming during defrost.

Just a thought.


The freezer is less than 1/4 full. Do you really think that would cause the temperature to go so high for so long?

Another question from the idea that the problem might be moisture in the system causing an ice blockage. If that was the case, would you all expect that ice would form on every defrost cycle or just randomly?

You guys are great - thanks for your time and input,

Peter

#24 The Seven

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 04:20 AM

[user=167]expat[/user] wrote:

The freezer is less than 1/4 full. Do you really think that would cause the temperature to go so high for so long?
Peter


Peter,

From your data file,
The freezer was started at -18C.
When you took reading every hour, the freezer raised to -12C Day 1 and -16C Day 2 before the defrost.
It seems that the freezer door was open every hour (or more frequently) to read the thermometer.

This will "upset" and raise the air temp in the freezer. Each time when the freezer door is open, most of the freezer air will escape and be "refilled" by outside (warm) air.

How did you measure the temp in the freezer? What type of thermometer? Where it was placed?

The Seven


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#25 expat

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 05:20 PM

[user=7]The Seven[/user] wrote:

This will "upset" and raise the air temp in the freezer. Each time when the freezer door is open, most of the freezer air will escape and be "refilled" by outside (warm) air.

How did you measure the temp in the freezer? What type of thermometer? Where it was placed?


Hi Seven,

This is kind of Catch-22, isn't it? I just used a cheap thermometer on a middle shelf. I don't have sophisticated logging equipment, so had to open the door to check. But the point of the exercise was not to make precise measurements but to get an overview of the cycle.

I thought it odd too that the temperature started to climb right away. After all, the door was only open for a brief time and the freezer had an hour to recover between checks. This is the tropics. Perhaps the ambient temperature rise is responsible.

Did you see my question on an ice blockage?

Thanks,

Peter

#26 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 06:01 PM

[user=167]expat[/user] wrote:

Another question from the idea that the problem might be moisture in the system causing an ice blockage. If that was the case, would you all expect that ice would form on every defrost cycle or just randomly?


The theoretical ice plug I was referring to would forum inside the sealed system and would not be visible.

#27 expat

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 08:28 PM

[user=1]Samurai Appliance Repair Man[/user] wrote:

The theoretical ice plug I was referring to would forum inside the sealed system and would not be visible.


I realize that. I did not ask if it would be visible, but if would form every time the unit went into defrost cycle or just randomly.

Thanks,

Peter

#28 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 09:14 PM

The formation of the ice plug in the sealed system would be completely unrelated to the defrost cycle. If the plug were to, perchance, occur just prior to the defrost cycle, it would probably melt during the defrost cycle, as the evaporator warmed up, and I'd expect that you would have normal refrigeration for a while after the defrost cycle. But the mechanism of its formation is completely unrelated to the defrost cycle.

#29 The Seven

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 09:22 PM

[user=167]expat[/user] wrote:

Another question from the idea that the problem might be moisture in the system causing an ice blockage. If that was the case, would you all expect that ice would form on every defrost cycle or just randomly?


Could you give us your thought/comment/answer on your question this time?;)



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#30 jurban

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Posted 07 November 2005 - 01:45 PM

Considering the minute amount of refrigerant in a domestic refrigerator and the fact that it is hermetically sealed i doubt the moisture problem. One fact is if it does have a moisture problem and an overheating problem then you will soon have a compressor problem due to the acid build up caused from the flurocarbons in the refrigerant, the hydrogen in the moisture and the heat. All add up to hydroflouric acid. It eats the insulation on the motor windings in the compressor and they short out. The dreaded compressor burn out. Hard to clean this up in a small cap tube system such as the home refrigerator.

But I don't think thats the problem. A quick check is to monitor the cap tube. As the "ice plug" forms, the outside of the narrow cap tube will start to form frost on it due to the expansion of the gas refrigerant caused by the pressure drop of the inside narrowing of tube. Refrigeration 101(no charge).

Your problem is a lot like mine. My GE SxS refrigerator gets to a butter dripping 110°F. I replaced the cheapest part the defrost switch and the main PC board. I still have the problem. I can't find a schematic or a sequence of operation for the damn thing without spending a fortune!

Can anybody help?


#31 Pegi

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Posted 07 November 2005 - 04:33 PM

Jurban, you are starting a new topic on the end of a 6 month old discussion.  If you could please start a new topic, include your brand, model and serial and state your problem in more detail please...;)
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#32 expat

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Posted 07 November 2005 - 07:23 PM

Jurban,

I thought ice in the system was a long shot and there has been no indication of that over time. I've decided to live with the fridge the way it is because of the lack of qualified repairmen here like the wonderful people on this forum.

Thanks for your thoughts on this and I hope you get your appliance working okay.

Peter


#33 jurban

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Posted 10 November 2005 - 10:37 AM

Thanks Peter,

I did find the problem but not until after I replaced the motherboard. That by the way wasn't the problem.

By chance I walked into the kitchen the other night, the lights were off and I could see a faint light comming from the fresh food side of the refrigerator around the gasket. Hmmm I thought. The GE mother boards adaptive defrost uses the door switch to determine use and subsequently defrost frequency and duration. I duct taped the switch, got a warm beer and went to bed. Next morning the beer was a frosty 38°F(a little too cold for my liking) and the frig has been running fine ever since the duct tape.

I did realign the door so the switch would compress fully when it was shut and now I have a spare motherboard. From what I have read on this forum about these GEs it's probably a good thing.


#34 jurban

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Posted 10 November 2005 - 10:41 AM

Sorry Pegi! I'm new and was searching past topics to see if I could find a solution to my problem before I presented perhaps a past solved scenario.




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