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Name That Cooktop! Or Electrode!


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10 replies to this topic

#1 stainlesssteel

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 05:07 PM

My apartment manager dad bought this KitchenAid gas cooktop on 28 April 1993.

I don't have a model number for the gas cooktop. I've since found that my dad removed the bottom cover of the cooktop when he installed in in 1993, apparently to make the installation easier or ?, and it's since been lost. It almost certainly is where the model number is.

The auto reignition function for the #2 electrode did not work...sparker won't turn off after the flame is ignited. I swapped the electrode in the #1 burner--the original factory one as far as I know--with the #2 electrode--this fixed the problem in the #2 burner.

I had taken the old #2 electrode to Coast Appliance in San Diego circa October 2005, and a counterperson visually matched it with a similar looking one, but a shorter electrode wire. This is the electrode on the left in the photo below. The correct electrode has the longer electrode wire--the worn looking one on the right). The incorrect shorter wire electrode on the left sparked and ignited the #2 burner, but wouldn't turn off.

My problem now is finding the correct electrode. This would be trivially easy if i knew the model number of the cooktop. I really thought that KGCT365A number was correct - but the electrode for that model looks different from either of the two electrodes in the photo.

So my choices:
1) Continue looking for someone that can ID the cooktop model by the picture in my first post
2) Find someone to visually ID the electrode on the right from my photo. Maybe there's a 40 year veteran with a photographic memory that will glance at this pic and instantly rattle off a 12 digit part number.

Anyone have a guess to either the model number or the electrode part number?

This is a partial repost of information in original thread, at:
http://applianceguru...rum1/11270.html

Attached Files


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#2 Keinokuorma

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 12:22 AM

Here's the closest thing I found listed for KitchenAid...

http://www.repaircli...?R=154&N=499768

Has the long nose, but diffrent alignment as it seems. You could browse RCC for other brands that might use the same electrode... just input one brand at a time in the form below, and select range/stove/oven as the type, no model numbers. I'm quite positive that yours isn't the only model (or even the only brand) that uses the same electrode type. But as it seems, it may take some browsing to locate it. Wouldn't hurt to try other parts dealers, if only they have pictures of what they're selling.

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#3 stainlesssteel

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 12:34 AM

Holy crap, that really looks like it!

If no one can ID the model of the cooktop from the picture, it's probably worth just taking a chance and ordering this non returnable electrode even at whopping $23....and i need two...
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#4 Keinokuorma

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 01:02 AM

How can you tell it is not returnable?

This part is not likely to go wrong even if you try it... and if you just look if it matches, there should be no damage done. I hear RCC will accept many electrical items for refund, perhaps even if they were tried...

Look carefully, and browse the other brands, you might get lucky.

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#5 Keinokuorma

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 09:59 AM

Having a better look, it looks very much the same. Well, these parts don't often go bad unless the ceramic insulator gets dirty... if the other one on the circuit is fine, I don't think you'll need two.
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#6 stainlesssteel

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 05:37 PM

Thanks, Keinokuorma. I neglected to mention that about 2 weeks ago, another of the burners started exhibiting the no-spark-turnoff behavior. I'm assuming replacing that electrode will fix that one too (not necessarily).

Yep, repairclinic.com takes returns all right...I just assumed electrical are not returnable. I confirmed I can even install the electrodes in the cooktop then return them. And they said on the phone they return ANY electrical parts. I'm not sure this is a positive...do I want to buy a electronic module that someone has returned? But it's great for my situation.

I just ordered the electrodes from your link--two of them plus $6.95 economy shipping for $52.45. I'll post the results.
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#7 Keinokuorma

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 09:15 AM

If the "no spark turnoff" problem only began after changing the electrode to the substitute, and only happens when that burner is on, and goes away when turned off, I bet it is all about the wrong electrode type and the characteristics of the re-ignition system.

As crouching tiger and asteysn2 pointed out, the electode must be licked by the flame for the spark module to get the feedback signal. The substitute electrode is spaced farther and has shorter nose, so it will be too far from the flame, although the gap is short enough for the ignition to happen.

However, if the problem is on another burner, check the electrode spacing there too, before ordering parts.

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#8 stainlesssteel

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 05:03 AM

It works! Thanks, Keinokuorma!

I replaced the two...sparking stops as soon as burner flame lit! Cool. Tenant is happy too.

Lessons I'm taking from this:

1) How critical electrode length is for auto reignition

2) How much extra work not having the cooktop model number caused. I can see people giving up and throwing the entire unit away due to a seemingly untraceable part. I've attached a screenshot of the correct sparker for reference: It's repairclinic.com item #499768.


I'm also noticing though, that the burner flame ignition takes about 1.0 to 2.0 seconds worth of sparking at approx 2 sparks/second. I just bought a new 2007 Whirlpool Gold GLS3064R stainless gas cooktop, with auto reignition of course, for another apartment unit.

http://www.whirlpool..._search=gls3064

I notice the sparking rate on the new cooktop is maybe 4 sparks/sec--about double that of the 1993 KitchenAid...nice improvement, and the burner flame ignites maybe in 1/4 the time. I'm guessing half the speed increase is due to the greater spark rate, and the other half due to clean corrosion free electrode and burner chassis surfaces...

I think i'll try cleaning the corrosion from the base of the burners where the spark travels, to shorten the time for flame ignition....

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#9 Keinokuorma

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 05:28 AM

One thing that affects the ignition time is the forming of combustible gas/air mixture in the surroundings of the burner. From some burner types the leftover gas vaporizes faster than from others... therefore a combustible mixture may take longer to form when the burner is turned back on. This could perhaps be considered more like a feature than a problem. You will notice this with a piezo ignited cigarette lighter too. Especially when turned to low flame, for succesful ignition you may need to hold the valve open for a second or so before pushing the trigger way down.

If you get some stray parks after ignition, this may be due to the same thing - the mixture may initially be uneven and the flame will waver a bit, so the electrode will not be steadily licked by the flame, thus triggering re-ingition.

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#10 stainlesssteel

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 06:29 AM

Hmmm...I'll revise my theory above to say part of the 1/2 of the slow flame ignition is due to dirty burner vent holes...(I notice the flame is more yellow than blue i.e. a sign of imcomplete combustion). But dirty burner vent holes would suggest it takes longer for a combustible gas/air mixture to appear in the vicinity of the spark...thus slower flame ignition.
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#11 Keinokuorma

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 11:01 AM

That is possible too.

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