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Service Shop Setup Questions…


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#1 Kyess

Kyess

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 07:50 AM

Hi all,

 

I’m not sure if this is proper forum for this, but I am interested in learning/hearing some advice on establishing a household major appliance repair service.

I would probably have to focus on higher-end brands because the area I live in has seen a dramatic building boom over the last decade and has a large affluent senior and well-to-do baby-boomer population. There genuinely seems to be a need for these services as there are only a handful shops scattered out in this part of southern MA, Sears being one of them. I have been mulling this idea over for several years and I really think I can make a go of this once I find out how to go about being established as a factory authorized service center.

 

Could you give me some idea as to what is involved, and what I will need to do to become a factory authorized service center, in order to get warranty repair work? Will I be required to carry a large parts inventory? Will I need to come up with large amount of capital?


I can’t do appliance sales since I don’t have actual retail space, just a small shop at my residence.
 I’m a licensed electrician and also do air conditioning and refrigeration service. I worked for an electrical company that also did household appliance repair from 1984-1996 and another where I did mainly commercial appliance repair until 2000 but pretty much missed the arrival of all the new high-end household brands as they came into being earlier this decade. I am a concerned that I may need to purchase lots of expensive factory service manuals and additional specialized OEM tools and equipment to become professionally competent and profitable in servicing these newer products. Perhaps the Samurai’s Enrolled Student Classroom would be a good pace to start.

 

Any info, insight or comments you could offer would be greatly appreciated.

 

Regards,

Kyess

 

 

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#2 longtimer

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Posted 18 February 2007 - 03:27 PM

I do not know where to begin, but the expense of numerous manuals should not be of concern. Many resources now available on internet and do not cost anything.
Writing out a formal business plan is probably the first step and you usually can get help from local chamber of commerce.
  Local appliance dealers can be of help also if inquiring on what needs thet may need, sounds funny but many dealers are willing to work with independent servicers to help themselves. We certainly work with several servicers in the local area.
Servicing HIGH end brands is certainly a good target (high end customer) but there are pitfalls that need to be addressed. These customers are often handled a little different than mainstream and the "SHOW" is most important with the high end customer.  The factories pay more with high end but there are more chasing the money and there are less calls on these appliances just due to density.  The best way you can show a dealer and or customer you are serious is to get the problem resolved quickly and finished. (not always that easy).
  Try not being everything to everyone, set your target, start small and do it well.
Good work even though limited will get attention, most common mistakes is trying to do everything and not turning work down that you are not efficient.
Factories are willing to set up servicers that are good and efficient and with dealers support this is easier. Some dealers do not like the competition, but themore enlightened ones should welcome the additional support. The only servicers I hate are the ones that do not do what they say they are going to do.

There are many more things that can help but I will let others chime in.




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