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Maytag Neptune Dryer Model MDG5500AWW


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Lurker_ScottyBeamMeUp_*

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Posted 10 April 2005 - 08:49 AM

Hello Samurai Readers,

My 3 year old Maytag Dryer had a sudden death (DOA) after power was restored from a neighborhood blackout.  I had Maytag's national service come to my house for repairs.  The service representative determined the dryer was beyond economical repairs since the labor and material to restore the dryer would be replacement cost :X.  In this case the damages were to the electronic printed circuit board (its components melted down), burnt wiring harness and melted LED/touch onsole panel. By the way my garage still has this lingering burnt carbon smell from this meltdown:(.

Maytag states "abnormal operating voltages" are not covered under their warranty.  They do not mentioned anywhere the need of a power line surge protector with the use of this appliance.  Their design did not have built in circuit protection even so the power is always on to a certain extent when the appliance is off.  It depended on the house circuit breaker to trip but in my case it was a slow meltdown until the house breaker eventually tripped.  Another reason to never run this kind of appliance unattended!

I did see another article on this site mentioning how unreliable these newer electronically controlled appliances are compared to the old fashion electrical/mechanical timer models.  Even a friend of mine that works for Sears appliance repair prefers the older models as far as lower cost long term  maintenance over the newer models. From my incident, both Maytag and the local power company did not take any responsibility for the melt down/electrical fire damage to the dryer.  Fortunately my home didn't burn down as an indirect result of this catastrophic failure.

Does anyone have a schematic to the LED/touch console panel?

Lesson learned: newer and more expensive products are not always better in this case.  User and buyer be aware!  Can we count on dependability or reliability?

Thank all of you for your sympathy,

Scotty

 

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#2 Moostafa

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Posted 10 April 2005 - 02:06 PM

Hello, my melted friend.  First, on behalf of everyone here at the Samurai School and the entire Muslim world, all four of my wives and all 17 of my children, and even my camels and yaks, let me say how much we grieve with you.  Like the prophet Job, truly Allah tests you to bring us wisdom even through the experiences of infidels.  Thank you for sharing this spiritually edifying tale of personal tragedy and triumph.

I have scoured the Internet using my iMac powered by a proprietary camel dung and lime juice battery and a satellite uplink in search of a schematic of your touchpad.  Alas, all I could find is the general schematic for the dryer.  As you can see in the attached image, the keypad is represented as a simple box. I pray this serves your needs.

Attached Files


Allahu Akbar!


#3 mastertech011

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Posted 10 April 2005 - 04:29 PM

Wouldnt  your home owners insurance cover this? They may replace the dryer completely. After deductibles of course.

#4 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 11 April 2005 - 12:00 AM

It looks to me like Maytag is looking for another class-action suit if we start seeing many more like this.

What will it take, having a house burn down and killing someone???????

I'm surprised your local power company wouldn't do anything, I've heard that at a time of power failure and subsicant power surge destroying appliance that the power company sometimes will have you fill out a report of time and date when occurance happened and reimburse for repairs sometimes.

William Burk (Willie)
Willie's Budget Appliance Repair
Eureka, CA 95501
William Burk (Willie)
Willie's Budget Appliance Repair
Eureka, CA 95501

#5 Lurker_ScottyBeamMeUp_*

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Posted 11 April 2005 - 01:03 AM

Dear [user=45]Moostafa[/user] and Samurai Readers:

Thanks for your efforts on the schematic diagram (which I already have) with the exception of the detailed Light Emitting Diodes/touch membrane switch of the console.

I've already contacted Maytag Corp. and the utility (Southern California Edison) both parties essentially walked away from this with denials of responsibility.  The federal government can investigate this if enough cases are presented to them that proves out if errors/omissions to the design of the product to be a fire hazard.

As you can see no circuit protection to the electronics is evident.  Only overload protection to the motor.

I have asked Maytag about Underwriters Laboratory (U.L.) testing and they say this product had passed its normal tests.  But they wouldn't give specifics on the limitations on the products ability to withstand power line surges, brownouts, & etc.

Interesting fact, my PC that was protected by a surge protector did not suffer any damage from the power blackout/restoration.

Sincerely,

Scotty
 


#6 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 11 April 2005 - 01:17 AM

[user=178]ScottyBeamMeUp[/user] wrote:

Interesting fact, my PC that was protected by a surge protector did not suffer any damage from the power blackout/restoration.
 

Samurai's 17th Law of Appliance Repair states that, "Raw power is dirty power."  Every 120v appliance I have with any kind of electronics in it is protected by surge suppressors.  This includes my Gibson front-load washer, microwave, bread machine, gas range, and anything else I don't want to waste time fixing.  I just use the little $10 plug-in surge suppressors that you get at the hardware store.  The computers are all on UPS and mondo-surge suppression with EMI filtering.  More than once, falling trees have taken down our power lines, creating spectacular fireworks in the process yet I have never had a failure of an electronics board in any of my appliances.


#7 mastertech011

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Posted 11 April 2005 - 04:22 PM

I live in tornado alley. We get some terrific thunderstorms and lightning at times with high winds. When I purchased this home about 12 years ago I got on of those whole house surge suppressors that fits behind the power meter. That coupled with the small surge suppressors on my computers and I have been fortunate despite many power outs via storms to have no failures as well. The whole house suppressor was like 400 bucks 12 years ago installed, and very much worth the peace of mind.

#8 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 11 April 2005 - 04:37 PM

[user=123]mastertech011[/user] wrote:

The whole house suppressor was like 400 bucks 12 years ago installed, and very much worth the peace of mind.


Defintely the way to go, superior to the piece-meal protection from the wall outlet suppressors because it protects the wiring in your walls, too.

#9 Lurker_ScottyBeamMeUp_*

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Posted 11 April 2005 - 05:08 PM

To all you Samurai Contributors:

I must hand it to all you guys in contributing to this forum :).  Lessons learned and preventative measures are the way to go to minimize or eliminate potential lost(s) will bring peace of mind.

I want to express my appreciation for all the great responses in this forum.

Sincerely,

Scotty :cool: All you guys are super warriors!


#10 cncguy

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Posted 11 April 2005 - 07:37 PM

:?WOW! that must have been one hell of a Surge, I've seen MOV's blow, but that looks like there was a short in the harness, good thing the house didn't catch on fire!

I would try to claim it on House Insurance, but if your like the rest of us, you have a $500 deductable, and then they will prorate it for being a couple of years old.

Sorry, but it sounds like you need to either watch ebay for someone selling parts, or just buy a new one.

:(





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