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Liz J.

Violent Shaking of Kenmore front loader -

7 posts in this topic

You're my only hope!  Sears totally sucks and is no help to us at all regarding this issue.  We have a brand new custom built home, solid as a rock, and we purchased the HE3 front loading washer from Sears locally.  I realize that the thing spins really fast, however, I can't believe that my whole floor, walls and light fixtures should shake as well, even on lower spin cycles.  The thing is level and plumb, we've tried styrofoam insulation between the machine and the walls, nothing is helping, especially the Sears people who keep trying to tell me I have a bad floor.  Do I need to chuck this thing or is there a "fix" for it?  Thanks in advance!

 

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

Look at the last 3 posts on this link  http://applianceguru.com/forum2/696.html

This previous post may help, also make sure there is not too much tension on the drain or fill hoses to the W/M.  Also, not overloading the machine can reduce the amount of vibration, as it allows the clothes to sit evenly around the drum without bunching.  Hope this helps:)

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This might help also IF it is found the washer is at fault and not a weak floor..every L.G. washer excessive vibration problem we have seen has been due to a weak wooden floor

______________________________________________________________________________

Sears introduces its ‘One Source’ phone line

Sears recently introduced a toll-free phone line that consumers

can use to register complaints about purchased products.

(1-800-479-5899). “Press 1 if

you feel a product has failed too soon" “Press 2 for a

service technician – no call/no show; Press 3 for a product

not available for delivery; Press 4 for problems relating to

multiple repairs in-warranty or under a protection agreement;

Press 5 for problems relating to multiple repairs out-ofwarranty

or outside a protection agreement; Press 6 for

products that were non-operable upon delivery; Press 7 for

parts not received in time for repairs.”

_________________

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It's likely a combination of floor and machine design. I don't think any installation on a wood floor will ever work  very long without excessive shaking, especially if it's on the optional pedistals. The longer you have the machine, the more it will stress the floor, the more it will shake. You could replace the entire machine a 100 times, and still have the same problem. There isn't anything a tech can do. Do you really think they just don't want to fix it? If they were lazy, they would fix it just to get you out of their hair.

It's the flex in the floor, and the design of the machine that are at fault. If your whole house shakes, then your floor is flexing. Whirlpool knows these things act this way on wood floors and the optional stands, but I don't think they will ever find a solution.

Don't rip the repaiman for a combination of home construction and appliance design, he didn't get a say in either. Do you really think they are just bad people? Maybe there is a secret knob inside that controls shaking, and they won't change the setting from "bad" to "good"

The washer and dryer belong in the basement on a concrete floor.

Nick

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Well said, my good man!  Concrete is the only thing strong enough to stand up to the vibrating might of :evil: frontloader man. (except titanium, but c'mon people, who's really going to build a floor out of titanium.  Unless of course you own a frontloader testing laboratory tucked away in a dormant volcano on a remote pacific island.......................)

 

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Up here in New Hampster, we have scads of  200 year old wooden houses with unique structural changes.  Amazingly, some of the wood floors in these buildings are a problem for washers.  I've dealt with this many times along with the suspicious looks from customers who don't believe me (I only do this for a living, so how much could I possibly know about it?)  For the occasional customer who could grasp the problem, I conquered the problem by adding extra stiffening struts to the floor joists.  Another technique is to placed a piece of 3/4" exterior plywood underneath the washer.  Of the two techniques, the former has been 100% successful while the latter is successful about 70% of the time. 

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