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Guest BHIRepairGuy

GE Spacemaker Washers Fills, no washee

5 posts in this topic

Brainlock. Can one of our esteemed Admins move this to the Laundry room where it belongs? thx

Looking for pearls of wisdom from the comunity.

This is the 2nd GE Spacemaker washer that has become DOA on our beautiful island paradise, Since you can only get here by boat :) it's hard to get seasoned help.

Customer calls, washer fills no spin. Checked timer line switch and door lock switches, both ok. Checked voltages from speed control plugs per tech sheet all ok. Checked fuse on speed control, burned out. Replaced speed control (259 bucks for a washer that costs 500 - you gotta be kidding! Thanks for breaking under warranty). All is well, washer spins. 5 days go by, customer calls back same problem.

Before we go the replacement route again is there anything other than the motor that could be causing the fuse to blow? Line voltage is 122.5 VAC. Fuse is 12A 250VAC. Do you guys think its safe to go to a 15A 250VAC fuse (these are the only ones available locally)? Don't see anything obviously amiss with the seed control board, burned contacts, diodes, resistore, etc.

Million dollar home, 5 dollar washer - go figure.

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

[user=204]BHIRepairGuy[/user] wrote:

Before we go the replacement route again is there anything other than the motor that could be causing the fuse to blow? Line voltage is 122.5 VAC. Fuse is 12A 250VAC. Do you guys think its safe to go to a 15A 250VAC fuse (these are the only ones available locally)? Don't see anything obviously amiss with the seed control board, burned contacts, diodes, resistore, etc.

Million dollar home, 5 dollar washer - go figure.

Hey, we're running the same kinda gig!  Up here in New Hampster, Lake Sunapee region, it's Second Home City for the high dollar city slickers from Boston and New York.  Even Aerosmith keeps a house up here on Lake Sunapee.  I know what you mean: some of these estates are worth over 5 million dollars, you go in 'em and they have GE crap in the laundry room.  Thing I wonder is, with all that obvious super-abundance of liquid cash, why they even bother calling me in to fix it instead of just having a new one delivered.  I dunno, just don't know.

When I see fuses blow repeatedly and in a short span of time, I know there's something else going on.  You know this, too.  The motor is one suspect.  You can check it out doing static tests with your ohm meter and dynamic tests using your amp meter.  Not sure if this is a DC or AC motor, but if AC, then you'll want to test the aramature insulation using a megger. 

The other suspect is power quality problems.  We have really dirty power up here and I suspect that most other resorty places do, too, because there aren't alot of industries around holding the power company's feet to the fire.  I check power quality using a meter specifically designed for this, a Fluke 43B.

FL43K-L3-1.JPG

They're a couple grand now.  Got mine from Grainger a few years back for about $1,500. 

Well, that's all I got.  I'm sure someone else will have something stunningly simple and insightful.  Stay tuned.

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Well, we do suffer from sucky power. It comes from the mainland under the river and I have seen it fluctuate from 105 to 130VAC (Thank God the nuclear plant is only 10 miles away huh?)

Now what really burns my keister is that the speed control pcb is from whirlpool. My background is not EE it's IT, but it seems to me that you would take into account a +/- 10-20% when you design the pcb.

Never have had the same problems with the various desktops and servers that we have on the island. Of course in my house EVERYTHING is on APC surge/battery backups. Of course the obvious question is why only GE, oh, never mind, dumb question.

I'm still wondering about upping the fuse from a 12A to a 15A. Don't want to burn down a multi M house if I can help it. The insurance company looks down on that kind of thing, know what I mean :)

thx

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I never deviate from design protocol unless I have a solid technical justification for doing so.  It's never worth shooting from the hip just to make a few bucks on a repair, could cost you a lot more in the long run. 

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Hi,

You might see if the local parts place carries slow blow fuse in replacing the fast blow one!  With motors there is always in-rush current (only way to verify peak in-rush currents is with a scope equipped with current probe while machine is running with full laundry load). 

Good luck,

Scotty

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