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angerooni

Washer drain overflow

17 posts in this topic

Hi,  My husband recently installed a new PVC pipe for the washer drain that goes out into the yard.  This is to bypass our septic system.  The problem is when it goes into the spin cycle water starts to pour out of the top of the drain after a minute or so.  It was doing this before in the old pipe so we thought we had a clog, hence the new pipe.  We have lived here for 5 years and this is a new problem.  Any clue what we should do?  Thanks.

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You did not say what brand of washer but washers have to drain at a certain rate, if the drain overflows there is something wrong with the pipe that needs to be addressed.  Perhaps it is not big enough in diameter or there are bends in it somewhere.  Only thing that can be wrong is the drain pipe has a problem.

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Yeah, that's what we're thinking now.  The old pipe probably was clogged and the new one is just too small.  Can't win:( Back to the laundromat for a few days, lol.

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If it is taking a "minute or two" to back up then its not draining fast enough. You don't describe the pipe that was put in. I assume its at least 2" & goes down the wall to the outside with a 90 degree el and then runs out somewhere. I suspect that it does not have enough pitch to allow it to drain as fast as the washer is pumping out the water. Also, if it is buried in the yard it needs a big enough hole filled with rocks (french drain) to hold or absorb the contents of the entire wash cycle (multiple wash and rinse cycles)

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Thanks to your posting a link (with pictures), we've solved our overflow problem. After getting a contract to buy on our house, one of the sale stipulations was that we resolve the drainage problem.

We too had snaked, finding no blockage, and resorted to draining into the utility sink for years. After being convinced it was simply a matter of the new washing machine pumping out excessive amounts of water at a time, we searched the web and stumbled across your pictures.

This morning, we purchased the appropriate PVC pieces, put it together in less than 20 minutes and crossed our fingers.

It worked!! Thank you again!!

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i have a maytag A608 and overcame the washer drain overflow issue over 20 years ago by inserting a shut off valve in the drain hose. it's open enough to allow the washer to function without overflowing the drain.  photos available as of 9-12-06

 

post-10175-129045093247_thumb.jpg

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rbacon:

When you added the valve, did it present any problems with spin cycles, etc...?  Knowing that our washer will begin the spin cycle whether all of the water is out or not, and will only spin for a finite amount of time, I worry that if we use this method, our machine's spin cycle will no longer be effective. (Kenmore 70 Series)

Thanks.

-Eric

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The update to this:

I installed it, last night.  Works like a champ.  Slows down the draining of the washer, somewhat, but thankully it has a slow spin to drain, before kicking into high gear.  Didn't have all of the tools neccesary to cut PVC, so I did:

2" x 2" x 1 1/2" Y.

From the 1 1/2" arm, I got a 1 1/2" >1/2" flush-mount reducing piece.

From that, I screwed in a 1/2" male piece.  I shoved the end of the drain hose over that, and clamped it down, tightly.

Then, at the top of the Y, I stuck a 2"x2' length of PVC pipe (pre-cut), a 2" connector, and another 2"x2' length.   Placed all of those into place by hand, and then tested it out.  Nice.

Going to seperate, and cement everything, and re-strap it to the wall, today.

Thanks!!  Re-plumbing would have been a nightmare, and expensive.  This fix cost, maybe $15.

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Eric,

the maytag works fine ... try installing the valve wide open, then close it just enough so that the drain doesn't overflow. you should have enough time, i believe the pump operates throughout the spin cycle. sorry for the delay in responding, was out of town for a few days.

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I live in NJ and have the same problem with a Maytag  LAT9406. The house was built in the early 70's and I guess the code was different then.

The drain line is 1 1/2" dia and when you put it on some, not all, heavy or extra heavy loads it backs up the drain line. I have the top of the drain line at 48" above the floor.

I want to try your solution first. What size valve, type, fittings, etc. do I need to get?

I appreciate any help on this. We had the plumber here 3 time this year and I'm embarrassed on what we had to pay for essentially nothing.

Thanks!

Front

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Front,

Since my drain hose may be different from yours, I suggest  you measure the inside diameter of your drain hose and get fittings and a valve for that size.

Once your valve is installed, operate the washer with the valve wide open, then gradually close it until the drain stops overflowing. Good luck!

Phillipsburg here, any questions call me at 908-454-1083.

Roger Bacon

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Roger,

It worked!

I used your configuration on Sunday.  Have a 1" dia hose on the washer and went out and bought same size PVC fittings, ball valve, hose & clamps. Put it together and set the valve about 1/2 way closed. Ran two washes through it and checked for leaks. No leaks, no strain on the motor and the washer empties no problem. More important - NO OVERFLOW!

Will keep an eye on it to see how it performs.

By the way, live in Phillipsburg too. Small world!

Thanks again!

Larry Dugan

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The vertical surge pipe will not only adapt for temporary water surges, but also it will let air escape upwards from the pipe so it doesn't restrict the flow... and it will allow air back into the pipe after draining is finished, keeping the machine from syphoning out entirely.

I've seen some very closed-architecture installations, either with or without a water lock between the machine and main drain... either way, I was called in because the machine stinks. There was trouble with the machine and the water lock as well syphoning out and allowing sewage gases to enter. Such an installation of a vertical surge pipe described here, above the lock, will neatly eliminate all of these problems, and it really isn't very expensive or difficult to do. Of course, there must be some means implemented to keep sewage gases from getting to the surge pipe.

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