Jump to content


Use this Search Box to Find Appliance Repair Help Now
Need help finding your model number?
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!


FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Welcome to Appliantology.org, the Web's Premiere Appliance Repair Resource for DIYers!

The world-famous Samurai Appliance Repair Forums


You can post a question and get repair help for FREE! Click here to get started.


Already a member of the Appliantology Academy? Just sign in with your username and password in the upper right-hand corner of the screen.

 


Photo

Sears Repairman Basic Electricity Test


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 yodamancoda

yodamancoda

    Unsui

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 11 May 2008 - 06:49 AM

Has anyone taken Sear’s Basic Electrical test the give when you apply for a job?
 I am supposed to take the test in a couple of days and would like a few pointers. What can I expect? The e-mail I received said it could last 1 ½ hours.
 Do I need to know how to add up ohms and amps in circuits?
 Most importantly what should I study?
Thanks a bunch, great forum and community!

Use the Appliantology Parts Search Box to Find What You Need!
Enter your model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

#2 Pegi

Pegi

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,120 posts
  • Flavorite Brew:Sweet Iced Tea

Posted 11 May 2008 - 08:23 AM

I have not but perhaps these self study job aids from Whirlpool will help you

Electrical Theory

Understanding Basic Electricity..
Buy your parts here! Posted ImagePosted ImageRead More

If we helped you kick some appliance bootay and saved you some coin, consider helping' us keep the lights on ==> http://beer.fixitnow.com

Are you a Master Appliantologist? ==> http://appliantology...ppliantologist/

#3 yodamancoda

yodamancoda

    Unsui

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 12 May 2008 - 06:02 AM

Hey thanks, any help is good help!

#4 Chat_in_FL

Chat_in_FL

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,257 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:on the house...

Posted 12 May 2008 - 11:44 PM

[user=34865]yodamancoda[/user] wrote:

 Do I need to know how to add up ohms and amps in circuits?
 Most importantly what should I study?
Thanks a bunch, great forum and community!



Covers all the basics of electrical theory. Test covers the following:

How electricity is produced.

Direct current & Ohms Law.

Parallel & Combination circuits.

Transformers.

Motors.

Household Electrical.

Diodes/Rectifiers.

Meter Fundamentals.

Safe Work Practices.


And, if I remember correctly, schematic/tech sheet reading...
We, the unwilling, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much, for so long, with so little, we are now qualified to do anything with nothing.

Mother Teresa

#5 nickfixit

nickfixit

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,151 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Glen Livit

Posted 15 May 2008 - 06:25 AM

Yes, you should study. The failure rate is real high. Plus you will get a drug test if you pass the exam.

Nick 
" Giving numerical data to Sears management is like giving a monkey a machine gun. No one knows for certain what will happen, but you can be sure of two things... It will be real messy, and only the monkey will be unharmed"

#6 Chat_in_FL

Chat_in_FL

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,257 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:on the house...

Posted 15 May 2008 - 09:20 AM

[user=425]nickfixit[/user] wrote:

Plus you will get a drug test if you pass the exam.

Nick 

And a Criminal Background Check...
We, the unwilling, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much, for so long, with so little, we are now qualified to do anything with nothing.

Mother Teresa

#7 NCARepair

NCARepair

    Kohai

  • Master Appliantologist
  • PipPipPip
  • 318 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 16 May 2008 - 07:09 AM

Make sure you know the many symbols for components on a schematic. Also make sure you know which pin on a line cord is neutril and line. Thre are about ten questions that this is needed on.  Most of this test was on refrigeration systems and only a handful were on other appliances. I took the test in December and can remember maybe five questions on things other then A/C.  I passed the test but declined to go any further as they were very deceptive about hourly wage.  Recruiter said maybe $15.00 to start and area manager said $18.00 to start but the max per hour I could get out of them was $24.00 with experience.  What a joke.  THey both said I could make more selling contracts.  This was for A & E position if it matters.

Good Luck

#8 Scottthewolf

Scottthewolf

    Senpai

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,742 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Dunkin Donuts Coffee

Posted 19 May 2008 - 09:14 AM

Those wages are not unreasonable. In my area that is the going rate.  Sears is ok to work for, but they expect you to move through your calls very quickly because 10-14 calls in an 8 hour day is what they expect out of you. I have worked for Sears 3 different times and no desire to go back.
Scott Wolf




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Use the Appliantology Parts Finder to Get What You Need!
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

Your Sometimes-Lucid Host:
Samurai Appliance Repair Man
"If I can't help you fix your appliance and make you 100% satisfied, I will come to your home and slice open my belly,
spilling my steaming entrails onto your floor."

The Appliance Guru | AppliancePartsResource.com | Samurai's Blog

Real Time Analytics