Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now or use the parts search box:

Parts Search

Isn’t it time to know what you don’t know?

Click here to check out our structured, online appliance repair training courses for rookies and experienced techs.

FAQs | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Podcast | Contact

Stay connected with us...

Samurai on Facebook - become a fan today! Sign up for our free newsletter and keep up with all things Appliantology. Subscribe to our YouTube channel for lots of appliance repair tips and help! Follow the Samurai on Twitter and get timely morsels of Appliantological Wisdom! Subscribe to our MST Radio podcast to learn secrets of the trade.
Mr. Chris

Whirlpool Top Mount Refrigerator

35 posts in this topic

Nice work getting the parts installed.

More information on setting refrigerator controls here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

[user=238]cdelsig[/user] wrote:

  Is that right or does my refrigerator have it's own set of coils for cooling? 

No. Only one evaporator coil in the freezer compartment

Is it correct that the compressor is controlled by the fridge control dial?  

Yes.

That is, does the fridge run more/more often (everything else being equal) with the fridge dial turned towards "colder?"

Yes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, now I have quite a bit more insight in the workings of a refrigerator.  Thanks, everyone, for all the help. 

One last question (at least for now)...at what friggin' temperature does ice cream freeze?!?  The freezer is currently around 21° and the ice cream is still soup.  I wonder if this current tub is long past freezing again.  I'll have to check the freezer in the basement. 

Chris

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a good heat transfer problem, worked many like this in Heat Transfer class in undergrad. The temp of the freezer doesn't tell you the temp of the icecream. It will take some determinate period of time for the icecream to pull down. That time is calculated by:

q=k*A*Delta(T) where:

q= the rate of heat transfer in joules/sec or BTUH

k= the appropriate heat transfer coefficient

A= the surface area of the object being chilled

Delta(T)= the change in time from state 1 to state 2, in seconds

This is simplistic, of course, because it allows only for conductive cooling. In a freezer, convective cooling would be a significant factor and would further reduce the pull down time.

Go ahead and make a first-brush calculation, state all assumptions, and I'll check your work. :geek:

P.S., as anyone who's made homemade icecream knows, you have to get the icecream slurry to 27F or below before it begins to harden.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, so...

 ΔT = q / (k * A)

Since there is an insulation factor of the carton and that is completely surrounding the ice cream (unless we would open the container, but that would really seriously skin over the ice cream and that may be worse than eating ice cream mousse), A would have to be the entire surface area, not just the top of the ice cream.

Further, wouldn't q be directly related to the difference in temperature (as the temperature differential increased, rate of cooling increases and vice versa)? So to figure this out as accurately as possible, with a changing variable, wouldn't we have to integrate somewhere in there?

Where would one find k?  Does it have to do with the specific gravity of the item changing temperature?

Chris

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[user=238]cdelsig[/user] wrote:

Where would one find k?  Does it have to do with the specific gravity of the item changing temperature?

 

Nothing to do with the body being cooled, it's dependant upon the conditions at the surface, the "film" layer.  K is often determined experimentally but there are published tables available.  A brief overview of the concept is presented here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, this particular part of the thread has gone a bit past my education in thermodynamics.  Well, if you define "a bit" to mean at least a parsec.  I haven't had much thermodynamics past high school.  Calc, yes, but not thermodynamics. 

My freezer in the basement (which is a Hotpoint that is probably at least as old as my Whirlpool) has solid ice cream and is a frosty 9°F.

So, the freezer compartment needs to be somewhere between 9°F and 21°F to cause ice cream to be hard.  If I were to dial my fridge to 'as cold as possible' and close the baffle between the freezer and the fridge as far as it goes, what would be the lowest possible degree at which you would say, "the fridge is not working as it should and needs to have the refrigerant recharged or the unit needs to be scrapped?"

Chris

p.s.  There seems to be quite a bit of integration in that equation.  'K' is defined by a changing variable and, thus, the original has at least 2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[user=238]cdelsig[/user] wrote:

So, the freezer compartment needs to be somewhere between 9°F and 21°F to cause ice cream to be hard. 

You should be able to achieve 0F in your freezer-- this is the ideal temp. 

Freezer temp and icecream temp are two different things.  It takes time for the icecream (and everything else) to reach steady state.  That was the point of our excursion into heat transfer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Freezer temp and icecream temp are two different things.  It takes time for the icecream (and everything else) to reach steady state.  That was the point of our excursion into heat transfer.

That was understood.  I am also happy to report that the 'mousse' is now much firmer than it was last night. :D  I'm still not sure at what temperature ice cream has to be to harden.  Geez, maybe I'll have to get a 3rd multitester and make sure this one has temperature probes, or maybe I'll get one of those infrared "guns."  At least now I will be checking the temp of the ice cream and not the freezer temp. 

Chris

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I already told you about the temp at which icecream hardens.  You musta missed it.  From my first post on heat transer:

[user=1]Samurai Appliance Repair Man[/user] wrote:

P.S., as anyone who's made homemade icecream knows, you have to get the icecream slurry to 27F or below before it begins to harden.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites