Jump to content



Learn appliance repair at the Samurai Tech Academy.  Learn more.  Earn more.


Parts Search
Site Search

FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Welcome to Appliantology.org, the Web's Premiere Appliance Repair Resource!

The world-famous Samurai Appliance Repair Forums


To get started, click here.


Already a member of the Appliantology Academy? Just sign in with your username and password in the upper right-hand corner of the screen.

 


Photo

Shorted dishwasher thermostat?


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 MikeFeldman

MikeFeldman

    Samanera

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

Posted 24 July 2005 - 07:45 PM

Pulled bottom panel... unit'd been leaking.
Powering back up got a fat spark on left side of the pan and tripped the breaker again. Pulled wires from thermostat and powered up again, and was able cancel cycle and drain machine.

Before I order a new theremostat, is there anything else that could be the problem instead? How hard is it to remove without pulling the unit?

And was it the door seal leaking? Sometimes got a small puddle and sometimes didn't. Never could see where the water was coming from.

-- Mike

Use the Appliantology Parts Search Box to Find What You Need!
Enter your model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

#2 MikeFeldman

MikeFeldman

    Samanera

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

Posted 24 July 2005 - 08:01 PM

Suppose I should have mentioned model -- KUDS220T3.

Google says that's also a Whirlpool dishwasher ... does one OEM the other?

#3 Pegi

Pegi

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,120 posts
  • Flavorite Brew:Sweet Iced Tea

Posted 25 July 2005 - 08:52 AM

Whirlpool makes Whirlpool, KitchenAid, Roper, Estate, and about half of the Kenmore appliances out there.  The Samurai Law states, "all leaks are visable"  Remove the toe panel, get you a flashlight, run the unit, and it will reveal itself.
Buy your parts here! Posted ImagePosted ImageRead More

If we helped you kick some appliance bootay and saved you some coin, consider helping' us keep the lights on ==> http://beer.fixitnow.com

Are you a Master Appliantologist? ==> http://appliantology...ppliantologist/

#4 MikeFeldman

MikeFeldman

    Samanera

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

Posted 25 July 2005 - 09:15 AM

[user=533]Pegi[/user] wrote:

... The Samurai Law states, "all leaks are visable" Remove the toe panel, get you a flashlight, run the unit, and it will reveal itself.


Even leaks in the past? Problem is that I can't run the unit with the thermostat/heater element connected because it trips the breaker, and I don't think it'll run past the heat cycle with the thermostat disconnected.

Are thermostat leaks common?

#5 MikeFeldman

MikeFeldman

    Samanera

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

Posted 26 July 2005 - 05:54 PM

I, [user=2367]MikeFeldman[/user], wrote:
Are thermostat leaks common?[/quote]

OK, 5/8 open end wrench gets the thermostat out without having to disconnect and remove the washer. It's got three posts, one of which has a copper cap nut that extends into the basin, and had the white, black, and green leads, and a second post had red and orange leads, and tyhe third post has no connectors. There's lots of mineral buildup around the base of all the posts, and the red electrode has a nice fat arc burn with some molten metal globs obscuring the end of a number stamped in the base of that post: 1NT02F-053. The post with the copper capnut says Malasia and ... L78-25 9131 ... which trails off under some mineral buildup.

I've got a meter handy -- what should I see for resistance across the various leads and across the thermostat terminals? The white-black contacts are closed, and the red-orange contacts are open with respect to each other and ground. The red-orange and black-white leads are open-circuit with respect to each other and to ground. The heater element measure 9.0 and 9.2 ohms single end to double end, and 18.3 ohms across the double-lead end, so I assume the one-lead end is a center-tap.

So here's the question: Did leaking and mineralization on the thermostat cause it to fail, or did a short elsewhere cause the arcing on the thermostat? In other words, if I order the $50 replacement theremostat and install it, with the new one fail because of some other fault?

#6 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Shōgun

  • Master Samurai Tech
  • 29,636 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Sapporo Original Draft Rice Lager

Posted 27 July 2005 - 01:47 PM

So many questions. In here, we give free appliance repair help to grasshoppers. You have received the solution to your problem. To prove you are worthy of further illumination, you must prove that you are more than a grasshopper: implement the repair that has been revealed unto you and post photographs of your handiwork. Then, will we be all to happy to talk with you ad nauseum about the nuances of failure engineering, of which you enquire.

#7 MikeFeldman

MikeFeldman

    Samanera

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

Posted 27 July 2005 - 06:44 PM

[user=1]Samurai Appliance Repair Man[/user] wrote:

... To prove you are worthy of further illumination ... post photographs of your handiwork...


Not by way of proof, but so that others might be illuminated ... I was able to find illumination for my camera:

Attached Files



#8 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Shōgun

  • Master Samurai Tech
  • 29,636 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Sapporo Original Draft Rice Lager

Posted 29 July 2005 - 07:06 AM

Good picture. The thermostat failed due to a loose terminal connection. Loose connections = heat and arcing. Terminals can become loose over time because they are cheap, flimsy pieced of metal and any variation in manufacturing tolerance can cause premature failure. It's a stochastic kindofa thang, dontcha know.

#9 MikeFeldman

MikeFeldman

    Samanera

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

Posted 02 August 2005 - 09:22 AM

[user=533]Pegi[/user] wrote:

Whirlpool makes Whirlpool, KitchenAid, ...


Whirlpool bought out Hobart and the KitchenAid brand, but Whirlpool doesn't seem too interested in supporting pre-Whirlpool KitchenAid washers. All of the onlineline parts sources I've tried list the part (4163588 thermostat) as no longer available or not in stock. The one site that Google found searching on the KUDS220T3 model number actually took my order and sent email confirmation of credit card approval, but then the web order status showed as canceled with no further email notification or answer to my query. A call to the service number got me the parts warehouse that serviced that order site, and the clerk there said out-of-stock, and quoted 2-3 weeks without knowing the part number.

So unless I can adapt a more modern part, or find a warehouse that hasn't been picked clean by online buyers, it looks like I'm screwed.

If I have to replace the dishwasher, I'm inclined to get a GE because I can get an employee purchase deal from them and I had success getting a gas range by that route. Any GE models to avoid?

#10 nickfixit

nickfixit

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,190 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Glen Livit

Posted 03 August 2005 - 03:04 PM

Any GE appliance will provide you with years of repair duty. You can work your way up to Master Appliantologist without leaving your own home.  The good thing is, you seem to have the skills to handle the journey. 
" Giving numerical data to Sears management is like giving a monkey a machine gun. No one knows for certain what will happen, but you can be sure of two things... It will be real messy, and only the monkey will be unharmed"




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Use the Appliantology Parts Finder to Get What You Need!
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

Your Sometimes-Lucid Host:
Samurai Appliance Repair Man
"If I can't help you fix your appliance and make you 100% satisfied, I will come to your home and slice open my belly,
spilling my steaming entrails onto your floor."


The Appliance Guru | Master Samurai Tech

Real Time Analytics