Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now or use the parts search box:

Parts Search

Learn appliance repair at online the Master Samurai Tech Academy.  Learn more.  Earn more.

FAQs | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Podcast | Contact

jermitts

colors (not clothes, wires.)

29 posts in this topic

I was wondering if there is a 'standard' wiring color code for washing machines, or if it varies by manufacturer... I know a lot of them are made by whirlpool, even if it says something else, and I wonder if they at least keep the wire colors the same between all the ones made by

whirlpool?

What I'm really looking for is a description of each wire (by color) and what it is supposed to do. I'm replacing my timer with an Arduino chip and relays. I've been trying to reverse-engineer the thing, but it's a lot of work. I think I figured out that 120 to gray+blue+red is drain, gray+blue+yellow is agitate, and blue+gray is spin. Also that 120 -> tan/red is hot h2o fill and -> yellow/red is cold h2o fill.

I know that tan turns into gray at the lid switch (or gray turns into tan, depending on which way you look at it) and pink, tan and violet have something to do with how it knows when the tub is full. (and when it is empty perhaps?)

I haven't figured out how brown relates to pink (brown, pink, and the two fill valves t/red and y/red are connected to the water temp selector) and I don't completely understand yellow/red/blue/gray, but

I know that the motor goes backwards for some functions and forwards for others. I know spin and drain go the same way and agitate goes the other. I don't know how violet works with pink.

There's a schematic on the back panel, but it's a little confusing. And hard to make out. The lines are almost invisible and the words are illegible. I do have most of the Arduino sketch worked out for the two cycles we

use, with the timings and everything. I just need to wire up the thing to some relays and get the relays wired to the right colors. My goal is to have a one-button start. And an automatic liquid soap dispenser from a 5-gallon bucket of laundry soap. And I want an email on my crackberry when it finishes a cycle so I don't forget about it. :)

I've documented every wire connection to the timer, between the timer and everything else in the top panel, and even documented how the timer with all of its notches and grooves switches between different wire routings. That timer mech is a work of art. Someone somewhere has

got to be pretty proud of that design.

Anyone got any hints? It's a whirlpool lsr6132hq1 with a brand new outer tub. :) I checked the model number three times. With a flashlight.

Thanks,

Jeremy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

"I'm replacing my timer with an Arduino chip and relays"

can i ask why? did you loose a bet?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, that is amazing, and I am enlightened. The "gray" was just backfeeding and confusing the matter. (I hooked up 120v neon lamps to every wire in the panel and ran some cycles and took notes to try and figure it all out!)

Thanks so much! This is exactly what I needed!

Just to confirm my understanding, 120v hot to blue and yellow (centrifugal switch will kill blue after start) with *red* to neutral will give me agitate. 120v hot to blue and red (centrifugal switch will kill blue after start) and *yellow* to neutral will do a drain, and then to get it to spin I just kill the motor and engage the same 'drain' wiring again?

I'm not sending anything through the lid switch except 5vdc- I'm handing the 'kill' on spin in software.

My "start" and "cancel" buttons are also 5vdc, as are the cold vs hot and "Super" vs "Small". I'm going to try and get full tub vs half tub functionality by wiring up two pressure sensors (one set to Small and the other set to Super) and doing the rest in software. Of course, the most important part is the lcd display that will tell me how many minutes I have left... :)

Thanks again for the links and quick help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
can i ask why? did you loose a bet?

LOL!

Everyone asks.

My primary reason is a hatred for continually pushing the knob in, twisting the thing 270 degrees, and pulling it out. That's all we ever do really. The thing runs one cycle for our clothes. We just don't have "delicates" or whatever those other cycles are for. "Soak?" Whatever. I want to throw clothes in, push the big green START button and walk away.

Secondarily I want to know when it's done. I forget about it sometimes, and end up re-washing a load that's been brewing all day/night. With the lid switch and software, I can send a "rotate me" email to my blackberry, and if that switch doesn't trip in 5 or 10 minutes I can have it send another "REALLY. THE WASH IS DONE." email.

Also, I need a good Arduino project, and the washer was something interesting. The parts are very cheap, about the same cost as a new timer, really. (not that I NEED a new timer, but you know, those things only last 30 or 40 years before they break!)

Lastly, I hate dealing with the soap-in-the-lid drama, :) so I'm automating the soap dump from a big bucket.

I'm sure you also have a hobby that doesn't make any sense to anyone else. Fess up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Parts list seems to mention a 2-speed Motor.

The Wiring Diagram seems to show a one speed Motor, although the Centrifugal Switch wiring dosen't seem right since after rotation speed, it would disconnect the (Start) and Run Winding.

The Motor Direction (Spin vs. Agitate) is determined by the initial "polarity" of the Start Winding.

here's a Wiring Diagram of a (2) Speed Motor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 2-speed thing confused me as well- but this isn't a two speed. The two-speed models seem to have an orange wire and #6 switch, mine doesn't have that at all.

It doesn't disconnect the start and run when it spins at speed, it just swaps wires around. The cent. switch moves red to the windings (red from the cap) when it moves up and blue goes to nowhere.

I don't really understand what point 7 and 3 on the motor are, I mean, how they differ. Is that a thermal between 7 and the center? I'm a licensed electrician (inactive btw, been a few years...) so I really should be able to figure out this motor diagram, but I don't understand 7 and 3.

Did I get the "how to get it to spin" part right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe your washer also has the "Neutral Drain" Transmission.

After Agitate, the Motor reverses for Spin, but the Transmission goes into "Neutral" during the Drain time, after which,

the Timer turns the Motor off for 3 to 5 seconds in order for the Latch in the Transmission to release in order to Spin.

Explained in 787772  #4  Mechanical

Understanding Automatic Washer  attachment.php?id=2760

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it has a neutral drain tranny. So drain, then 3-5 seconds off, then spin it up in the same direction and it will kick into spin. Easy 'nuff.

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It look like if the Blue Wire "goes to nowhere" after rotation,  that will disconnect the Run Winding....

The Motor Thermal Overload is that thing between 7 & 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[user=45554]jermitts[/user] wrote:

Yes, it has a neutral drain tranny. So drain, then 3-5 seconds off, then spin it up in the same direction and it will kick into spin. Easy 'nuff.

Thanks

yes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After studying the Mechanical manual...

you should check some of the new Front Load washers

Uses a direct drive variable speed / direction DC Motor

No Belt, Transmission, Brake, Clutch, Spin Prawls, etc...

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, see where R comes off the cap and into the cent switch (left side), and then to BK start winding (right side)? It's slanted up to the top of the BK point from midline of the R point. I think they are indicating that the R will move up to the BU point (the main winding) when it is up to speed. This would move power off of the start winding from R, move power off main winding from BU (point 4) and simultaneously move R (at point 10) to BU on the motor main windings.

No?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yes, that makes sense

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[user=3641]RegUS_PatOff[/user] wrote:

After studying the Mechanical manual...

you should check some of the new Front Load washers

My next washer is a Staber. No comparison. But the arduino awaits!

lcd-display-example.jpg

(the 99:99 is where the remaining time goes, and in the lower left corner I've added a [CANCEL] button - it's a touch screen)

here's a better pic:

rinse.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[user=45554]jermitts[/user] wrote:

Ok, see where R comes off the cap and into the cent switch (left side), and then to BK start winding (right side)? It's slanted up to the top of the BK point from midline of the R point. I think they are indicating that the R will move up to the BU point (the main winding) when it is up to speed. This would move power off of the start winding from R, move power off main winding from BU (point 4) and simultaneously move R (at point 10) to BU on the motor main windings.

No?

You're missing something in reading the diagram.  The blue wire going into the centrifical switch goes thru an internal buss, (indicated by the solid dark lines, see symbol legend), in the switch and directly back out to the blue wire on the motor.  That contract doesn't move, when the motor is up to speed the start windings are removed by the contact in the cent. switch that the red wire is attached to opening the internal switch to the motor black wire, (the contact that moves to remove the start windings doesn't move all the way up and contact the blue buss).

In the two speed motor there is another moveable contact in the start switch to make sure that when the motor is trying to start it is alway going to start in high speed then when up to full speed start windings drop out and the low windings are energized from the speed control switch or timer feeding power to the orange wire instead of blue.

As far as direction of startup, that is determined by the polarity of the start windings upon starting, which are controlled by timer contacts 7 & 14 reversing polarity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Budget Appliance Repair wrote:

... You're missing something in reading the diagram.  The blue wire going into the centrifical switch goes thru an internal buss, (indicated by the solid dark lines, see symbol legend), in the switch and directly back out to the blue wire on the motor.  That contract doesn't move...

thanks, Budget Appliance Repair, confusing diagram, but that makes more sense

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you should do a write up of your design. can you explain what an arduino is? some sort of generic programmable controller? how are you going to accomplish the detergent dispensing? You might look into a pressure switch from a newer front load washer. instead of being triggerd by a pre-set limit they are digital and send a variable signal back to the control. these switchs also have mechanical switch inside for overfill that you could wire into your controller to trigger a drain cycle in case of water valve failure. if you would like i can trace out the spin/drain and agitate circuits using photoshop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice traceout diagrams, Master Denray!

Jermitts, cool project from a purely technical point of view... with a definite functional benefit from your perspective. Thanks for posting it here. I hope you'll consider making a Youtube video and posting the link here so we can feast our mechanically-switched squinties upon the final product. :shades:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh man, that is awesome. I've been staring at the schematic for hours really, and somehow I just couldn't see how that thermal tied in. Now it makes perfect sense.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arduino

Ardunio is like "the new basic stamp." I mean, it does what a basic stamp was supposed to do, only cheaper and easier and better. It's based on an ATMEL microcontroller, but it has a bootstrap loader that allows downloading of sketches (programs that look like a simplified C variant, it's based on Processing/Wiring) to control all the io lines. The basic model has 12 digital io (6 can do pwm) and I think 6 analog lines. It does I2C so you can add another 16 digital io lines with a $3 I2C io chip, and you can put up to 127 of those 16 io chips on one Arduino... In case you need a LOT of io... ;) (I think that's around 2032 total)

Anyway, there's a whole following on the Internet for this thing, because it's open source hardware and firmware, and people post the sketches they write and plans and everything. An assembled Arduino including shipping can be had for $33, or you can build one yourself from parts and the parts total about $16.

There's also a "Sanguino" variant that is based on a larger ATMEL chip and modified firmware that gives something like 32 digital and 8 analog. You can build one of those for about $18 in parts.

There are all these pre-written libraries you can use too, like one for interfacing with a 4 or 8 bit lcd. So a lot of the hard stuff is already done.

SOAP- I'm going to try to use a 12vdc windshield wiper pump from a 5 gallon bucket of diluted laundry soap. I'll dilute it enough to get the pump to like it, and then figure the time it takes at ~12v to get about the right amount of soap into the tub during the beginning of the fill. Then, the plan to refill the bucket is to let it run almost dry, then pour in a whole bottle of soap (we always buy the same kind) and add water to a sharpie-line on the bucket to get the ratio right to match the dispense time. Once I get it right, I'll add a trigger to the bucket so I can add the soap and hit a "new soap" button and it will fill the bucket with water to the line. (slowly, so as not to cause bubblys!)

Thanks for the photoshops. I don't know why I didn't just do that early on. The lamps-tapped-on-wires routine was a total waste of time! I should have asked earlier for the diagram!

The timer and the tranny are really amazing mechanical devices. The timer with all its switches (it has six spdt with center off) controlled by the player-piano-inspired wheel, and the tranny with all those parts for neutral drain followed by spin. And apparently, most of the time, it all works very well for years and years and years. That's just total pride in craftmanship! Now-a-days, all the complicated stuff is hidden away in software-designed ICs, almost nothing fancy in hardware!

I'd love to run into someone on the team that came up with the timer design. I wonder how old it is? I might go do a patent search... ;)

Jeremy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[user=1]Samurai Appliance Repair Man[/user] wrote:

I hope you'll consider making a Youtube video and posting the link here so we can feast our mechanically-switched squinties upon the final product. :shades:

We got our daughter a Flip for Christmas, so I can document it and post to YouTube. I've got a lot of wiring to do, and then I plan on having a pcb made (batchpcd.com) because I don't want to leave it on a breadboard. I think this was the final bit of info I needed, and I picked up two 10a dpdt relays last night to do the w-bk/r/bu/y reversal. (one to do the wire swap and the other just to control on-off.)

And thank you Master Samurai for the help the other morning. I'd been waiting since Monday to get on here and post! :) Stupid browser!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[user=45554]jermitts[/user] wrote:

... The timer and the tranny are really amazing mechanical devices...  and the tranny with all those parts for neutral drain followed by spin. And apparently, most of the time, it all works very well for years and years and years... Now-a-days, all the complicated stuff is hidden away in software-designed ICs, almost nothing fancy in hardware! ...
.

LG Direct Drive Motor from WM2688_Training_Manual.pdf

LG Direct Drive Motor from WM2688_Training_Manual.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's all well and good, but decades ago, some guy(s) figured out how to do it elegantly with what they had. And for all its complexity, it works very well, over and over again. Apparently the timer mech was designed before ICs, and they figured out how to make parts of it advance by timer and parts of it advance by sensor, all with 120v logic controls. And they work over, and over, and over...

It just seems to me that most of the stuff made these days doesn't end up lasting as long as the same stuff made years before, even when the designers and engineers say it's better than the previous because it is somehow different. There are a million examples. I'm not saying the dc brushless direct isn't better than a beltless brushed motor with a transmission, only time will tell that. I'm just saying that, over the past 20 years, it seems like things aren't made to last as long as they used to be made to last.

My 98 car died at about 130k miles. My wifes 85 has 500k+ and still runs. Sure, it gets terrible mileage and leaks oil everywhere, but it isn't dead yet. I could give another 100 examples (water heaters, hvac, carburetors, CRTs, hard drives, microwaves, toasters to name only a few) but I won't bore you with all the details. You've seen it yourself in some aspect I'm sure.

__

Yes, I need to make a signature. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yes, they've learned how to make things last a certain amount of time...

a "6 yr" water heater used to last forever, until they ran some life-cycle tests and determined... ohh.. the tank walls are too thick...

old GE fridges with the "round condenser on top"

wringer washers ...

those days are gone ...

now it's a throw-away society ...

imagine the land-fills ..

http://www.automaticwasher.org/index.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites