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GE Washer WWA8350VCLWH (S/N TF117318G)


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8 replies to this topic

#1 baumgrenze

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 03:06 PM

I just finished a 25 year scheduled maintenance on our 1DA 820X1 W (S/N XX220 547) GE dryer which came, used, with our house in 1971. We gave up on the matching washer and bought a brand new on in 1980. It has been leaving soap scum residues on 'clean clothes' from time to time. I had notes for how to pop the top and pull the agitator. I am at this stage now.

The first observation is that the wash water return (top, rear, right) was full of lint. This suggests to me that perhaps the recirculation pump has a worn impeller and is no longer providing adequate flow. Does this make sense? I seem to remember replacing one of these. It may have been on the original machine. I cannot find any notes.

A failing, almost 70-year-old memory demands that I keep notes now, a digital diary with plenty of digital photos. They are a great help in deciding who goes where when it is time to reassemble. Here is one other suggestion FWIW. As you start, grab a piece of corrugated cardboard and poke all the screws and bolts into it as you remove them. Write a note next to them. Include the wrench size if you want to save time when reassembling or another time. Put the list into your appliance diary when you are done.


I popped loose the agitator cap and applied a few drops of Liquid Wrench to the splined shaft end through the openings in the top of the agitator. I gave the end of the shaft a few taps with a rod and hammer (to get the penetrating oil into the spaces between the agitator and the spines.) With a few minutes of rocking and tugging I removed the agitator. It is full of soap scum underneath. I lifted a small plastic cap at the bottom of the shaft and exposed three bolts that hold down the inner tub and some connecting hardware which I assume connect the shaft to the transmission. Is there a parts blow up I can copy from the web some place? The top of the shaft is quite rusty. Has anyone used Loctite's Extend for rust like this?  Click on this link for more information. Extend  I also noticed a few bare steel rusty patches on the outer tub, near the top, where the inner tub and outer tub have clashed. I am tempted to try Extend here, too, perhaps followed by a good metal enamel paint.

My wife is concerned that there may be rusting around the drain holes in the inner tub. Is it a big deal to remove the inner tub at this point? Is there a tutorial for this somewhere? I have read that what looks like rust may, in fact, be transmission oil leaking from a worn transmission. Would I pull the inner tub to replace it anyway?

Thanks for any insights on this project at its current state of progress.

FWIW and if it is permitted, well stocked appliance parts shops are getting harder and harder to find. For appliantologists who live in Santa Clara County, California, I've found what looks like a well stocked business:

Premium Appliance Parts
3445 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA 95051
(408) 241-9919

baumgrenze



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#2 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 05:33 AM

 

This may be a similar diagram



Posted Image

 

 



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#3 baumgrenze

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 12:18 PM

Dear RegUS_PatOff
 
Thank you for posting the parts break-down. I cannot be sure if this is similar. Perhaps part of what I am seeing is included in a second drawing showing the motor, transmission, and driveshaft for the agitator? I’ve attached a photo of what I see.
(GEWasherAgitatorShaftBoltsCloseUpSmall.jpg)

I will have to learn how to get it to show in the preview, but at least the image is uploaded. When I view it, it is



http://applianceguru...nt.php?id=4223.
 
Am I correct that my next steps in removing the inner tub are to remove the two horizontal bolts at the base of the drive shaft (one showing) and then the three bolts that pass through the inner tub whose heads are showing in the photo? I’d like some reassurance that reassembly will be relatively straightforward. The case on this machine is a continuous piece of enameled sheet steel that wraps around from a few inches in the back forming a back flange, the left side, the front, the right side, and a second back flange. It appears from this image I was led to by the FAQ:
 
http://www.flickr.co...57594119788747/
 
but this machine seems to have sides still attached. I do not want to unnecessarily get into a situation where I need to hold nuts from below through the back while inserting bolts through the tub.
 
I am considering an idea. I have a bottle of WasherMagic. I am tempted to reassemble the machine at this point and run it through the machine to see what it will accomplish. I am willing to be guided regarding hand cleaning things I can now reach, like the cruddy drive shaft, before putting things back together and using WasherMagic. I am also ready to move forward and pull the inner tub to get a sense of how filthy its outer surface and the inner surface of the outer tub are. Please offer guidance.
 
Thanks,
 
baumgrenze

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#4 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 01:36 AM

Don't try to remove the single upper bolt in the hub that goes sideways, you don't want to take this basket hub off.

Just remove the three bolts at the bottom, and be sure to use a 12 point socket, if you try to use just a regular 6 point socket you're going to strip the heads off the bolts.

Once those three bolts are out, the basket will come right out, straight up.  It is very heavy, there is a concreate weight built into the top of the spin basket.

That photo set you have linked to on Flicker is the newer, (JUNK), style GE washer, nothing at all similar to yours.

William Burk (Willie)
Willie's Budget Appliance Repair
Eureka, CA 95501

#5 baumgrenze

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 05:33 AM

Thank you for your guidance, Budget Appliance Repair.

I was suspicious of the Flickr images. I did not enlarge all of the images, but it was pretty clear that the outer tub of the machine on Flickr is made of plastic.

Is the "rust spots in a pattern like the drain holes in the inner tub are caused by leaking transmission oil" less likely (perhaps even much less likely) for my 30 year old GE than it is for the newer style machines?

Thanks again,

baumgrenze

#6 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 01:53 AM

A 30 year old machine, you're going to have rust!!!!

The porcelain finish around the holes could very well be chipping and rust could be forming.

As far as the bare/rusted metal area at the top where it looks like the spin basket has rubbed the outer tub, that is exactly what has happen, not uncommon at all to see.  Have even seen some that have worn completely through the outer tub.  Make sure the 8 snubber pads are in place, (2 on each corner underneath, the flat metal plates at each corner should be between each set of two snubber pads -- these are what keep things in place when the spin is out of balance to keep the spin basket from slamming the sides of the outer tub).

Another very bad point of rust out to be aware of is once you get the spin basket out there is a rubber star boot that is the seal between the transmission and the outer tub.  This area has a bad tendancy to build up with silt, pins, and other debris then rust will form, if you start to try to clean all the junk out of the area you could end up with pin holes or worse in the bottom of the tub.

William Burk (Willie)
Willie's Budget Appliance Repair
Eureka, CA 95501

#7 baumgrenze

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 04:01 PM

Willie,

Thank you for your most recent information. Is the time correct on your posts? They read between 3:30 and 4:00 AM. I hope you are not staying up all night on my behalf!

I cannot see any snubber pads at all. What I do see is this. The alignment of the inner tub seems to be controlled by steel cable that runs up to the left corner to a vertical pulley, across the front to the right to a horizontal pulley and then back to the rear right corner to another vertical pulley.

We have the agitator and associated parts soaking in dilute vinegar overnight to remove the lime scum that will come off easily. Discussion being the better part of valor, I think I will reassemble the machine and run WasherMagic through it to see what that accomplishes. Perhaps it will clean out the pump and associated lines.  At this point I won't pull the spin basket just yet. I do not think it will clear the top of the machine unless I remove the return water spout (right rear corner) and that looks like it might get easily broken unless there is a secret technique known only to Master Appliantologists to make it happen readily. It is, after all, 30 year old plastic.

Have you ever tried wire brushing the rust off the spline on the top of the agitator drive and then waxing it with classic carnuba car wax. It seems to forestall rust on the top of my table saw and machinist's square. Perhaps wash water is too alkaline and it will just decompose the wax. Is there such a thing as making it too easy to lift off the agitator? Will it come loose during the wash cycle?

Thanks,

baumgrenze


#8 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 01:57 AM

[user=47444]baumgrenze[/user] wrote:

Willie,

Thank you for your most recent information. Is the time correct on your posts? They read between 3:30 and 4:00 AM. I hope you are not staying up all night on my behalf!


Yes, that's the correct time.  I usually do my internet work from midnight to 5 or 6am and get up around 1:30 - 2pm to do my appliance repair work and try to get home by 7-8pm.

I cannot see any snubber pads at all. What I do see is this. The alignment of the inner tub seems to be controlled by steel cable that runs up to the left corner to a vertical pulley, across the front to the right to a horizontal pulley and then back to the rear right corner to another vertical pulley.

You will have to remove the back panel to see the snubber pads and plates.  They are at the bottom of the cabinet, one in each corner at each leveling foot.  Make sure none of the straps that hold the snubber springs have rusted thru, that will let the tub swing around more then it should when it's out of balance.

We have the agitator and associated parts soaking in dilute vinegar overnight to remove the lime scum that will come off easily. Discussion being the better part of valor, I think I will reassemble the machine and run WasherMagic through it to see what that accomplishes. Perhaps it will clean out the pump and associated lines.  At this point I won't pull the spin basket just yet. I do not think it will clear the top of the machine unless I remove the return water spout (right rear corner) and that looks like it might get easily broken unless there is a secret technique known only to Master Appliantologists to make it happen readily. It is, after all, 30 year old plastic.

I've never had one of those water recirculation spouts break, just get a good hold on it and pull it straight out.  It would have to be removed if you want to pull the spin basket otherwise you would break it off trying to pull the basket up past it.

Have you ever tried wire brushing the rust off the spline on the top of the agitator drive and then waxing it with classic carnuba car wax. It seems to forestall rust on the top of my table saw and machinist's square. Perhaps wash water is too alkaline and it will just decompose the wax. Is there such a thing as making it too easy to lift off the agitator? Will it come loose during the wash cycle?

Thanks,

baumgrenze

Anytime I work on these if I pull the agitator I clean the splines with a wire wheel and put a light film of silicone grease on the spline so they don't rust and the agitator can be removed if need be.  The rubber support on top is what holds the agitator in place, and it shouldn't just pop off from the wash cycle, it usually takes a good strong pull to disengage the agitator coupling from that top support/seal.  The air trapped in the agitator dome creates an airbell to keep water away from the top of the splines if all is working and sealed correctly.

William Burk (Willie)
Willie's Budget Appliance Repair
Eureka, CA 95501

#9 baumgrenze

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 08:21 PM

Willie,

Thank you one more time for your patiently offered advice.

I hope I can sign off from this thread. We will see if the WasherMagic helps a lot.

baumgrenze





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