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Guest Burn_me_once

dryer is on fire

25 posts in this topic

I recently fixed an ear piercing scraping sound by replacing the rear drum bearing assembly on a 4 yr old GE Dryer model #dvl228ea0ww.  while replacing the bearing I noticed some discoleration on the back panel near the heating element.  The new bearing assembly worked like a charm however, while checking the rotation I noticed the inside of the drum glowing.  consequently the back panel was hot enough to burn skin.  I think this has to be a thermestat issue but which one?

thank you for your time and consideration 

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   The force is telling me your heating element is grounded.  This mean it is touching the metal around it somewhere.  Why not open it up and have a look.  

   What caused it?  Maybe it happened all by itself.  Maybe you bumped into something when you had it open the last time.  Or,  A lot of the time poor venting will cause the element to overheat and sag and fail.   

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So wise you are master.

I took a closer look and even tested the element for continuity with the back panel.  It seemed fine.  I carefully inserted the drum into the bearing assembly without coming in contact with the coils, but when I ran the dryer, again the coils got red hot.  is it possible that I distorted thier shape the first time I inserted the drum into the bearing assembly so that they now contact the drum at some time when it rotates?.  Is there any other explination for this? should I just replace the coils?

thank  you again for your time 

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     I may have misread your first post.  Somehow I thought it was glowing even though you weren't using the dryer. 

    There may be nothing wrong with your dryer.  The rear of the drum is an inch or two away from the element.  Of course it's hot enough to burn you. 

     Let it run for a while.  Does the top outside get hot?  if no then you're ok.  If yes check the vent.

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thank you again.

I thought it odd that the element got red hot.  I thought the temperature was only suppose to get 135 degrees.  

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Last reply.  your patience is matched only by your wisdom

Ok I watched the dryer for a while.  sometimes on the start up I can see the coils get red hot and then they fade out.  but the discoloration is in the top center of the back panel and this is where it seems to generate the most heat.  The top of the machine under the console from the center to the right also seems warmer then it should be.  Does this sound normal or what indication should I look for to indicate I should not use this machine.

Thank you again wise one  

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Are you running the machine with the door open to watch for the red glow of the coils?

If you are, then of coarse the dryer is going to get to hot in certain areas. No air flow over coils with door open.

On the G.E. dryers, if you hold the door switch with door open and start the dryer you will see the red glow of the coils then they will soon go out with door open because the coils create to much heat in the back area where the Hi-Limit safety t-stat is located because of the no air flow with door open.

In all electric dryers the heating coils glow red hot - when the dryer calls for heat you get the full 220volts across the heating coil which will cause it to glow red hot then when the air temp coming out the exhaust reaches the temp of the cycling t-stat (normal around 135 - 155 degrees) the power to the coil is turned completely off 0volts until the temp goes below the reset temp of the cycling t-stat then heat comes back on.

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Yes initially with the door open but after a few minutes of normal operation the back of the machine got hot enough to cause second degree burns.  considering most dryers find themselves pushed up against a wall this seemed excessive.  My thought was that the thermostat was shorted causing the dryer to be running at the constant temp. of the cutout.  Does this sound possible.  Are there any other explinations for this? or is there any way to check the thermostat to test my theory?

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[user=2]Jedi Appliance Guy[/user] wrote:

         Let it run for a while.  Does the top outside get hot?  if no then you're ok.  If yes check the vent.

 

I use "the paper test" to check the vent.  I hold a sheet of paper near the air intake on the dryer.  Then I disconnect it from the vent and do the same test.  If there is a significant increase in airflow with the dryer disconnected from the vent then it must be the vent

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[user=2]Jedi Appliance Guy[/user] wrote:

I use "the paper test" to check the vent.

Clever. The kidneys are strong in this one. :touched:

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I don't get it.... Thanks......... I think?

Ya'll sure talk funny up there.

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GE makes a kit for some of there dryers that spaces heating element out 1/4 inch from back of dryer comes with a high temp cutout fuse suposed to help the excessive heat on the back case. Air flow kit with 330 degree limit thermostat: we25x10011 Check the foam seal between the front panel and the blower housing. Make sure you have a tight seal here so air is not bypassing going thru the drum. above kit comes with new blower seal

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[user=2]Jedi Appliance Guy[/user] wrote:

I don't get it.... Thanks......... I think?

It was a genuine compliment, Jedi.  I thought that was a clever test.

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there is air flow with the or without the vent and the dryer is hot on the top as well.  Not warm hot. 

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because the discoloration was present in the back of the machine to start I also now believe it is possible that the excessive heat warped the plastic support of the rear drum bearing causing the loud noise.  Is this possible? 

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And what was the result of the clever paper test that prescribed by the Jedi?

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When the paper was held up to the intake air pulled it to the intake.  When I disconnected the vent there was some difference .  The paper was pulled towards the intake with more force.  when you say check the vent.  I have ensured there is no obstruction going out past the machine back.  I have also ensured that the vent connected to the fan is clear.  Could the fan be clogged?  What am I checking for? 

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There's more to a good dryer vent than just being clear of lint.  It's all about minimizing airflow restriction.  Think about all the ways airflow can be choked off in your throat.  You could have a piece of chicken stuck there, that would be analogous to the lint in the vent that everyone thinks off.  But what if someone wrings your neck and chokes the snot out of you?  This would be analogous to a crushed dryer vent.  I recommend that you read up about dryer venting.

As another test, run the dryer with the vent completely disconnected.

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I have run the drier with the vent diconnected.  The vent to the outside is short enough of a run that I can look all the way through it.  I have removed the vent from the blower to the dryer back and it is clear and in good condition.  The only thing I can think of is that there might be something stuck in exit section fo the blower unit.  There seems to be plenty of air blowing through the vent but even the air is getting extremely hot. 

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Couldn't pull up anything on your model number.  Re-check it.

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[user=307]burn_me_once[/user] wrote:

because the discoloration was present in the back of the machine to start I also now believe it is possible that the excessive heat warped the plastic support of the rear drum bearing causing the loud noise. Is this possible?
See My last post also get a thermometer and measure temp out of dryer should be close to thermostat setting . Did you recheck to see if you disturbed blower seal ?? get the kit i gave you in last post install it and that will help excessive heat on back just might solve your problem also let us know

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model # is DVL223ea0ww  I probably put an o where zero is sorry about that.  I have used this number to obtain the rear drum bearing assembly  

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[user=5]mopar X[/user] wrote:

See My last post also get a thermometer and measure temp out of dryer should be close to thermostat setting . Did you recheck to see if you disturbed blower seal ?? get the kit i gave you in last post install it and that will help excessive heat on back just might solve your problem also let us know

Mopar, either your posts are invisible or Burn_me_once is ignoring them.  :huh:

 

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I Need to be more FORCEful in answering

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i sort of thought that:banana:

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