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drmtaylor

Installing Amana oven igniter

5 posts in this topic

Dear wise and honored Samurai,

I'm so glad I found your site.  I've been reading through it about igniters but haven't found an answer to my problem.

I have an older Amana stove --  model ARG7302WW, mfg P1143337NWW.  It's been diagnosed that the bake oven igniter is no good.  We had a ligtning strike that blew the air conditioning circuit board and a TV, so I'm guessing that may have caused its demise. 

I bought the new igniter, unscrewed the old igniter, but the end wires themselves won't pull out.  I've yanked, but don't want to yank too hard. 

A local used appliance repair guy suggested I just cut off the end of the new igniter, strip the wires and attach the new igniter wires to the old igniter wires using ceramic wire nuts.   If so, what is the best procedure for doing that.  Do I twist the wires together or just stick them in the nut?  The idea of doing it incorrectly and having it close to gas "blows" my mind.

Is there another/better way?  Do I need to remove the rear panneling of the oven to reach the end plug?  Looks major to do that.  Lots of screws    Shouldn't this be easier?  Am I missing something?

My humble thanks for any help

Dorothy

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

Cut the wires, strip them back, insert the bare wires into the ceramic wire nuts then turn the wire nut to the right to lock the copper wires inside of the nut.  When it stops turning, tug on the nut to be sure it is locked good...

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Also, you should be using ceramic wire nuts when you make the connection-- plastic wire nuts can melt!

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Thank you so much for the quick response and the detailed instructions.  Also the emphasis on the ceramic wire nuts!  The salesman at Home Depot kept insisting that plastic ones would work.  But I hunted them down and my oven is working again!  Thank you both!!!  :D

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Welcome.....perhaps the dude at Home Depot best keep his current job and not go into appliance repair....and needs to know what he is telling their customers is correct....:?

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