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Dead dishwasher


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3 replies to this topic

#1 wyckofft

wyckofft

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Posted 01 October 2005 - 06:31 PM

OK, this is all new to me, so please be understanding. Here's what I've got - Maytag DWU8860AAX dishwasher.  The dishwasher suddenly went dead - no washing, no lights, no nothing. 

I've been reading on this site about the basics, and went out and bought me a multimeter and everything.  The first thing i did was find and order a replcaement door swicth, as most descriptions of this sort of problem eluded that that's the most common failure. It was a cheap part, and there was a bit of evidence that it could be bad so I went ahead gave that a try. despite my confidence that the swicth was to blame, when i installed the new one it still failed to operate.

I've also read a lot about thermal fuses on these things, and of course i know enough to *hope* it was something as simple as that. However, I haven't been able to find any indication that this model even has a fuse of any kind?

So there's question #1: Does my model have a bloomin fuse, or no? If yes, how can I find the sodding thying?

So...now i'm left with a lot of much more difficult things to try to analyze. I'm a bit too much the novice to restore the power to it and test for actual current, though clearly that would be best, huh? I have verified that the outlet is hot; everything else I plug into works. 

So, having pulled the switch out and staring at what is to be seen there, i started trying to identify and eliminate bits form the equation. What i thought may be another control panel-like thing turned out just to be a swicth bank; everything seemed fine there. Really the only other bit that seemed worth testing was the timer assmbly. I did so with my new fnagled MM, and I believe the reading was 2.3 K-Ohms.  Another web page ocnfirmed that this is in keeping with a normally functioning part.

So...at my wit's end I, started looking more closely at the wiresw going to the switch. After a long while, I deduced that one of the black wires and one of the white wires coming into it were direct from the main power source. So, I'm guessing (and now it seems pretty apparent) that the swtich when closed completes the "main" circuit and also sends power out through the wires connected to the, er, 'outbound' part of the switch. So...i tested resistance between the 'outbound' white and black leads (I could take a photo, but I'd have to take it back apart at this point, so let's please assume I was able to follow the wires coheerently; I'm pretty confident) - same result as with testing the timer.  it then occurred to me to test the incoming power source wires.  So I made a jumper wire with alligator clips, tied the hot and neutral prings of the power core to each other, and completed the circut with my MM probes.  I got the 'infinity' resistance reading.

Now, the wiring under the unit looks pretty straightforward to me. I took off the kickplate, followed the incoming power cord to where it's tied in to the internal wiring, and I can pretty much see that it's a fairly direct shot from the power supply right to the switch.  So....I'm just about ready to conlude that the issue must be with the power cord itself, or outbound internal leads, or with the connection between them (which I sorta balked at disconnecting to inspect, feraing taht I'd make things worse).

SO....questions: Can anyone confirm my theory, that the incoming power is pretty much a straight shot from the wall up to the door switch? And that if I disconnect the door switch and try to complete the circuit as I decribed by jumping the prongs on the power cord and bridging the leads with the MM that I ought to see a low resistance, indicating a fairly functional circuit? Further, if everything I've outlined is as I believe it to be, is it a pretty valid conclusion to blame the power code, or the connection to the internal power leads?

Any other advice would be greatly appreciated as well.


Thanks infinity,

- Tom


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#2 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 03:13 PM

Hi Tom,

We'll need the wiring diagram to ID the suspects in this game and to plan a troubleshooting strategy. It should be in an envelope behind the kickplates. Scan it in and post a nice, legible copy here. If that's not possible, you can fax it to me at 775-416-4449 and I'll post it.

#3 Lurker_tom@dahtkahm.com_*

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 05:19 PM

I went head with my theory and it worked - a rat had chewed through the power cord. Hence no circuit there.

thanks for your time.


#4 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 05:49 PM

Better do something about those rats, too. Sounds like a little rodent rage is in order.




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