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Root Kill Question


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6 replies to this topic

#1 LaundryMom

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 02:38 PM

This isn't about an appliance, but I hope that someone can answer since it's plumbing related.

We have a city sewer line and roots have grown into the sewer line and caused problems in the past 5 years or so. Once every other year we have had to rent a sewer drain cleaner to clean the main line leaving the house. Finally I read somewhere about Root Kill, a copper sulfate powder that you pour down the drain and when it comes in contact with the roots, it will kill them. It leaves the plant/tree alone but just kills the roots that come into the line.

The directions on the bottle say to apply in the spring and in the fall. However, we forgot this fall. The suspected tree and the bush are naked and dormant.

My question is, is it too late? If we apply the copper sulfate at this late date (We just received our first snowfall two days ago) will it still be effective?

Thanks in advance.
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#2 kdog

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 03:55 PM

I believe the proper procedure is to remove the tree and replace the damaged sewer service line :mellow:
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#3 RussTech

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 11:24 PM

Eventually, cleaning out those roots with a cable is going to break that sewer line, and then you'll be forced to remove the tree and repair the line.

#4 Bullstok

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Posted 13 January 2012 - 08:26 PM

For those people not wanting to dig up their front yard to replace pipe and "do it right": after the roots are removed, the pipe can be lined. It is done from in the house where the pipe leaves. It is not cheap. It involves fiberglass mesh tube (think sort of like a fire hose), epoxy resin, and a liner bag. The fiberglass is coated with epoxy and the whole tube is slid down the pipe. The inner bag is inflated, pushing the liner against the sides of the old pipe. The liner sets up & if done correctly, it is as strong as new pipe or stronger with only a small inside diamater sacrifice. It can be done for pretty long runs. Look it up if you want cause it is a little too complicated for the amount of time i have for this reply to explain it fully. It is a great choice in many circumstances though. Obviously is not a do it yourself kind of thing.

#5 jumptrout

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Posted 13 January 2012 - 09:18 PM

Please give me the short version of the google search. What is the keyword?

#6 Bullstok

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Posted 13 January 2012 - 10:24 PM

I suppose it would have been a good idea of me to leave a link or 2. Please keep in mind I do no endorsing of a particular method or product. I also do not do this work myself as a plumber. I have seen it done and I know it works. I also know it can be done wrong (if the epoxy sets before the liner is in place you get no second chances.) This is a specialized sort of thing in many areas. Here are a few links to check out:

http://www.perma-liner.com/
http://www.dontdig.com/drainlining.php
http://ussewer-drain...ipe_lining.html
http://www.formadrai...ain-connection/

Note: there are other methods available too. Pipe bursting is done for larger scale jobs. Basicly you use hydraulic rams and large cable to pull a cone through the old pipe with the new pipe coming along behind the cone. The old pipe breaks appart as you pull in the new pipe. The rams are so strong that it can burst even cast iron pipe easily. Lots of cool happenings now a days... Directional boring is another...

Oh crap. Being new I forgot to check rules about links. If those need removed then here is a simplified search string:

sewer pipe lining

Also, sorry for hyjacking the post, that was unintentional. I don't know a thing about root killers. IMHO temporary chemical solutions to mechanical problems are never good. Drano, bars leak, fix a flat, etc, etc, all things that when used by people wanting a cheap fix, usually piss off the ones who end up performing the real solution.

Edited by Bullstok, 13 January 2012 - 11:00 PM.


#7 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 09:43 AM

Oh crap. Being new I forgot to check rules about links.


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