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Miele W1918A - notchy drum


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18 replies to this topic

#1 GrahamW

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 10:31 PM

I picked up a used W1918 in need of some work. The drum moves and feels more-or-less free, but it doesn't feel quite right when compared against my smooth-feeling W1903. Just moving it by hand, the drum feels/sounds notchy (much like a worn wheel bearing). There is little/no movement in the drum if I try and grab the front edge and pitch it forward back.

I have the tech manuals (thanks kdog), so I'll be disassembling and investigating when I get a chance.

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#2 GrahamW

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 12:19 PM

I think this video sums up the noise pretty well.

#3 GrahamW

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 11:07 PM

It is looking more like a bearing problem. I've not quite figured out what the best way to pull the drum/tub is, but I can find no issues with the pulley, motor drive, etc. I've also noticed there is some movement (and a bit of a knock) if I push from the inside of the washing drum upwards at the top. I can feel no play if I push on the sides. At this point, there is nothing indicating the cast spider is damaged.

So, does anyone have any ideas on pulling the drum out of a Miele machine? I'm sure I can figure it out but I figure I'd asks for advice first. Unfortunately, the procedure doesn't appear to be covered in the standard service manual :whistling:

Thanks.

#4 kdog

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 11:30 PM

Nobody that I know has ever done one, their eyes just kinda glaze over at the mere mention of it - their failure is apparently unheard of
The ones I'm thinking of actually have the bearings mounted in a cast iron cradle external of the water tank

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#5 GrahamW

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 09:11 AM

I've been doing my best to read some of the European forums (mostly in German) and the bearings certainly do not appear to be a common failure. Nevertheless, it is what it is. At a minimum, I'm going to need to get the drum out and the only way I can see to do that is hoist it from the top. I did find one thread pointing to the youtube clips below:





#6 kdog

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 01:40 PM

Great Video's - certainly a job not for the faint of heart

Good luck to you if you choose to persue this endeavor, certainly worthwhile with those machines !

Edited by kdog, 26 January 2011 - 02:26 PM.

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#7 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 02:25 PM

Good luck to you if you choose to persue this endevor, certainly worthwhile with those machines !

and pictures and/or videos along the way, would be nice
.

one of my video productions: “Easter Seals: Walk With Me”

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#8 GrahamW

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 05:17 PM

Here's one final video where you can hear the machine run. The darn thing is so noisy at 400 rpm that there's really no hope of using it as is.



I have one well supported beam in the ceiling that I use to hoist heavy things but my shop is mostly geared for woodworking so I'm going to need to move a few things around to make space before I get started. I'll do my best to document/photograph the process.

#9 kdog

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 07:01 PM

Does sound like a bearing issue - good idea to lift it with straps and come along, another option is to erect a small scaffold around the machine to use for lift support - have had to do that to access the fuel pumps in both of my trucks to lift the rear bed off. very nice looking machine, those are the good ones with the 240v heaters - definitely a worthwhile venture. I'm jealous :groucho:
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#10 GrahamW

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 02:45 PM

It has been a while since I updated this thread. I don't have much time with young kids so I'm often lucky if I can find 1hr every night to work on disassembly. I've reached the point where it is decision time with regards to repairing the washer. I'm going to post photos and give some commentary below. Folks can also check out this thread if you are really interested.

Here's an overview:

Posted Image

It took about 1hr to disassemble everything in preparation for hoisting the drum. The actual lifting of it, was straight forward:

Posted Image

Here's what the rear of the outer drum looked like with the pulley removed:

Posted Image

Pulling the cast cradle was a pain. A good 24 soak with kroil and a large 2-jaw (gear) puller was needed. The outer bearing came with the cradle, the inner did not:

Posted Image

Pulling the inner bearing was a real pain. Here's what it looked like:

Posted Image

Unfortunately, my long arm puller cracked the outer race:

Posted Image

So, here's what the inner race looked like:

Posted Image

I ended up needing to separate the outer tub from the inner drum and then cut the inner race:

Posted Image

Posted Image

#11 GrahamW

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 02:46 PM

Free at last. At this point, I was pretty happy.

Posted Image

At this point, I started cleaning the inner drum, shaft and spider:

Posted Image

About half-way done, and the rust appeared:

Posted Image

Finished, note the pitted rust spots on the spider:

Posted Image

Here is a series of close-up shots:

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

The backside of the spider (behind the shaft):
Posted Image

At this point, I'm leery of reusing the spider/shaft. I don't like the sight of rust in the back of a washing machine... especially one that can spin up to 1600 RPM. The exact order in which things failed isn't clear but it was probably the rear drum seals which was followed by the bearings and spider rusting. The spider appears to be coated, and is only rusting where pitted, as I've tried to show in the photos. Again, there's a bit more discussion in this thread.

#12 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 03:47 PM

nice photos :thumbsup:
you may be a candidate for an Apprentice appointment upgrade
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one of my video productions: “Easter Seals: Walk With Me”

every day is Down Syndrome Awareness Day
"A Child Is Waiting" . Burt Lancaster . Judy Garland . 1962

RegUS_PatOff > www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPAY2LsKVEw

#13 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 04:10 PM

Wow, those are fantastic photos! Well done, my fine young apprentice. Posted Image

For sharing these excellent photos of your fine craftsmanship with the School and for your obvious talents in the ancient martial art of Fixite Do, you have earned a permanent merit Apprenticeship. Kanpai! :samurai:

#14 GrahamW

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 08:00 PM

I'm glad everyone liked the photos and thanks for the acct upgrade. :thanks:

It is honestly easier to have a cheap digital camera in the garage than a notebook and pencil these days. I had originally thought that I'd write-up a complete photo how-to on repairing the drum bearings but it doesn't look (to me at least) that the spider can be saved. Given the cost of replacement, the W1918 door seal and electronics (+ associated part) will be swaped into my W1903 so that I can get the delay/countdown timer functionality (this is my wife's only complaint about the W1903). That being said, I am going to try and fish my borescope into the W1903 to see what it looks like. It has no symptoms of bearing problems, but I'm going to try and get a look just the same.

I've been asked previously if this is a job anyone can do and how long it would take. In dissassembly, it took me just over 5hrs to the above photos. I had the tools, so no money spent thus far... just my time. To get this far, I needed a set of metric wrenches, sockets, pliers, a 6" two-jaw gear puller to remove the cast cradle/weight, a long-reach two-jaw bearing puller (should have worked for the inner bearing), and a pilot bearing puller (to remove the outer bearing from the cradle). Be prepared to soak the bearings in a good penetrating oil and you may need a torch to heat the inner bearing race or (worst-case) a die-cutter/dremel to cut the inner race as I did (this took about an hour alone).

Edited by GrahamW, 21 February 2011 - 08:02 PM.


#15 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 09:02 PM

some info
W1900 Technical Information
link PM'd
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one of my video productions: “Easter Seals: Walk With Me”

every day is Down Syndrome Awareness Day
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RegUS_PatOff > www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPAY2LsKVEw

#16 kdog

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 09:08 PM

Wow - great photo's ! thanks for posting those.
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#17 GrahamW

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 10:24 PM

So, does anyone have any opinions on whether the spider/shaft can be re-used? Or does everyone agree that, at least in the case, rust + the groves cut by the seal in the collet signifies irrepairable failure? I'm going to try and get comments from Miele on what they suggest.

#18 kdog

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 11:43 PM

It has always been my experience that grooves made in shafts by lip seals render shaft surface unrepairable - it is likely that if you used the old spider, it would work fine for a period of time. I would replace the spider, but shudder to think of what that may cost
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#19 pcworth

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 02:46 PM

I take it that there was not a good outcome here? Thanks very much for your amazing post, which has clarified what seems to be a similar problem that I have with the same Miele washer , which apparently has a different model number here in New Zealand.
Regards,
Peter




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