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PS3


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2 replies to this topic

#1 TennBears

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 07:27 PM

Yep mine has it. Anyone here know how to fix it?

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#2 arbi

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 10:23 PM

Edit: I'll just explain my understanding of the situation and why the need for a re-flow. It seems Sony and MS use very poor soldering on their boards. A good example of this is with the xbox 360s, there seemed to be a lot of 'cold solders' and they would get cracking, mainly surrounding the graphics card. Amazingly, an easy fix (read. re-flow for a 2 year old) is to wrap the xbox in several towels and leave it running. I have actually tried this and works amazingly. Enough heat to soften the solder and smooth out the cracks.

The PS3 method described below is a bit more advanced that wrapping it in towels, and there are a lot of methods on line for re-flowing a PS3. Most use heat guns, but I don't like these for big circuit boards due to the directness of the heat, and room for human error. The oven based re-flow worked well for me, (after all, these things are made in ovens) the temperature is not hot enough to melt the plastic. heats the whole board evenly and cools it evenly.

I've fixed it. though its not for the faint of heart.

My friend even put it on his site:
ylod.



You can find dismantling guides on line.

Essentially bake the motherboard to re flow.

key points:
Do your research first.
Remove the battery from the mobo!
keep it level
acknowledge that I take no responsibility for any outcome of you doing this!
do not move the mother board from the oven until it is COLD. it will take hours.

Mine has been running since the post on that website. (September last year I believe

edit: remember, if you screw this up, its all over.

Edited by arbi, 06 April 2011 - 05:20 PM.


#3 TennBears

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Posted 12 June 2011 - 01:47 PM

Wow man just saw your reply. Thanks I wil have to give this a try!




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