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lakshman

Lennox G20

4 posts in this topic

The fuse keeps blowing out when I turn on the AC. The furnace works well if I ask for heat. I looked for shorts and was not able to find any. I also investigated if there were shorts on the external unit - everything there is OK. What are my options?

Thanks,

-Luke

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

Critter chewed the thermostat wires maybe, Weedeater got to the wires maybe.

Edited by applianceman18007260692

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Not really - those wires look clean and the terminals are connected. I do not see any issues at that end.

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I agree with the weedeater or critter. here is how you check the wire going outside. You have a dead sgort(wire to wire) or a short to ground.

disconnect the 2 wire at the furnace and at the condenser leave them hanging in the air. Take an OHM reading between the 2 wires . you should get no resisatance of any kind . then check each wire to a good ground. again you should get nothing . Tie one end of the wires together. take a reading . it should be very low resistance (less than 10) .

If those check out then the problem is in the condenser most likely.

Check for resistance to ground on the wires going into the condenser control circuit . there should be none.

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