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Amana Oven Slow To Preheat


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3 replies to this topic

#1 scanor

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Posted 07 November 2005 - 06:45 AM

I moved into a house that has an Amana 'The Big Oven - Capacity 5.14'.  The model number is ACF4225AB.  The year on the label of the stove states that it passed inspection in 2001.

I am having problems with the oven reaching the proper temperature in a reasonable amount of time.  This is the test I performed with an oven thermometer.  I set the oven temperature to 350 degrees. 

After 11 minutes the preheat light turned off.  The temperature was less than 200 degrees.

At 15 minutes the temp was 250 degrees.

At 20 minutes the temp was 290 degrees

At 30 minutes the temp was 325 degrees

At 35 minutes the temp was only 340 degrees.

I ran out of time and had to stop the test at this point.

 

I know preheat in ovens that have the baking element covered should usually take between 10-20 minutes, so this seems a bit unreasonable.

 

I removed power to the oven and tested the resistance of the bake and broiler elements using an ohmmeter as recommended in the Amana Technical Information – Component Testing Procedures.  Both the bake element and broiler element had the correct resistance 20 ohms and 19 ohms, respectively.   I also tested the voltage across the bake and broiler elements, when the oven is first turned on and the voltage is 240 V.

 

I also tested the resistance of the Oven temperature sensor with an ohmmeter.  The resistance was 1100 ohms at room temperature.  So it also looks like it is within spec.

 

What does the control limit switch do?  I have tested it and it always appears to be in the closed position even after the oven has reached 235 degrees?

 

Do you have any idea what is wrong with my oven?  Why does preheat turn off before the oven is up to temperature?  Is it the Electronic Range Control?  Or the control limit switch?

 

Are there any other tests that I can perform to determine the part that is failing?  Does anyone have a schematic of the electronic range control?

 

Any help would definitely be appreciated – thank you in advance.

 


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#2 Trying to help

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Posted 07 November 2005 - 07:17 PM

That was one of the first units with a hidden bake element. The pre heat you provided of 10-20 minutes on 350 will not be met. You would be looking at close to 30-35 minutes to reach desired pre heat temp. on a correctly working unit (known problem or difficulty on these units). I am a little concerned about what type of thermometer you are using to take the temp with. If it is a spring loaded oven thermometer that is sold in the store you might be getting some bad info. These types of thermometers are very slow to react to temp changes. They will eventually get there, but react very slowly. As a tech to explain this to consumers, I would take it out of the oven and put it on the counter. It would still read 350 after 5-10 seconds. Is the room temp 350? With oven mitt on I would place it in the freezer for 5 seconds and take it out. Is the freezer over 300 degrees?  would still be reading over 300. It just takes a long time for them to acclimate and get to the temps. Once up to temp, they are usually fairly accurate. The thermocouple attachment a good tech will have on there meter will go from a 350 oven to to room temp once it is remover in about 5 seconds. When placed in a freezer, it will then drop from room temp to freezer temps in about 7-10 seconds. The fact that your oven is getting as hot as it is indicates the element is fine. Your sensor values should be apprx. 1050-1100 ohms at room temp if you want to make sure it is within factory specs. 
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#3 scanor

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 04:49 AM

I appreciate your description regarding my oven thermometer.  Can you recommend a more accuracte inexpensive thermometer probe so that I can take a more accurate reading?

Thank you


#4 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 08:01 AM

He was describing a thernmocouple attachment used on a multimeter-- an essential tool for professional techs. But this type of thermometer does the same thing, is easier to use, less expensive, and is perfect for most folks' needs.




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