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Frigidaire Electric Stove FEFL79GCA


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5 replies to this topic

#1 anthopper

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 08:32 AM

So this morning (while the oven was good and hot), I attempted to pour some milk into one of my kid's sippy cups. The fridge is right next to the stove, so I set the cup on the cooktop and poured the milk. Being half asleep, I knocked the cup over and a bunch of milk ran over the cooktop (this was cold), over the lip and down onto the door.


There are some VERY convenient holes in the top of the door (I'm sure they have a purpose besides allowing liquids into the door) that allowed a ton of milk to flow in-between the panes of oven glass and, as the oven was hot, burn right on. This has left about 6 wide whiteish, brown streaks on the glass.


I know I have to open this up and clean it out, but am not sure how to approach it or if I need anything on hand when I do (spare gaskets and the like) to be sure I can but it back together.


Can anyone help me out here with instructions on how to get to the insides of the oven glass?


Thanks,

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#2 KurtiusInterupptus

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 10:38 AM

Its a pretty simple job...get yourself a flat surface and spread out a pad to work on.
remove door from oven...I think yours has a little flip tab on each hinge arm. Open the door and flip the holding tabs ...close door till it catches the tabs and lift up and out at the same time...may have to wiggle it,just little bit.LOL
Then, just start taking out screws, top ,bottom and sides until you can split the door and access the glad pack to disassemble and clean.
pay close attention to position and orientation of all pieces for reassembly...may help to take some pictures along the way.
Good luck!
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#3 anthopper

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 05:28 PM

OK. That sounds straightforward enough.

Thanks, I'll probably give that a shot tomorrow.

Take care and thanks for the quick reply.

#4 kdog

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 09:31 PM

Note that if it is a self cleaning range, the glass window panels may have a heat reflective coating on one or both sides, so try and make sure you keep the treated side inward towards the oven heat, also avoid using any steel woll or abrasive brushes to clean them as it might haze the glass. Sometimes they use glass panels with the treatment on both sides - this can be checked by measuring across the surface of the glass with an ohmeter, if it is treated, will be low resistance (up to couple hundred ohms), if untreated, will be very high or infinite resistance (Kohms)
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#5 anthopper

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 08:32 AM

Kdog, Thank you very much for the additional info. I went light when I cleaned them as I was not quite sure how to run the test you suggested. As it was, I never removed the inside glass panel from
the door, so if it was treated, it will still be facing the right way.

The job is done and my wife is very happy.

For those of you out there who are like me and new to self appliance repair I wanted to post a few of my own details in case someone else stumbles across this post with a similar issue.

  • As Kurtiusinterupptus explained above, there are two tabs at the hinges that pull down toward the door and then lay flat to allow the door to be removed. Once these are down you close the door, it will not close all the way, so do not try to force it.. There will be a 8" or so gap like you may leave open if you are cooling the stove off. Once you meet this point simply lift straight up and out and it should come free. The door is not too heavy, but be prepared to take the weight.
  • For this model there are screws on the inside panel (facing up or topside if you laid it down with the handle facing the floor) and on the bottom edge that need to be removed.
    • There are six screws on the inside panel (3 per side), but only the ones that need to be removed are at the top (opposite the handle).
      • I took out all six, but found out the bottom four simply hold in the hinge assembly, so I put them back in.
    • When you remove the two screws that are through the handle, remember that this will release the handle from the door. If this is the only thing you have propping up the door (mine was laying flat, handle down, on a towel) the door will drop the two inches or so to the floor. No harm done for me, but I wished I had thought of it before.
    • The handle screws are held in place between the door panels by a metal bushing type thing (it certainly has a proper name that I do not know). They just sort of fell out on me, and I had no idea what they were, which was a little distressing at first as I was trying to make careful note so I could put it back together. I figured out what they were and really appreciated them when I put things back together as they made getting the screws though the outside panel a breeze at the were held firmly in place.
    • There are 4 screws on the bottom edge that all need to come out.
  • The inside panel will lift right out at this point and can be set aside. The inside glass is held in place by screws so there was no risk of it falling out.
    • I cleaned the glass lightly with windex, then water.
  • The glass for the outside panel just sorta sits there, so don't go picking up the door or it can fall out.
    • I cleaned this lightly as well with windex and water and just left it in place the whole time.
  • For reassembly, I set the handle screws through the inside panel and though the locking bushings I described above and they stood up nicely. Dropping the panel into place and getting the screws through to the other side of the outside panel was a breeze. Once it was through, I stood the door up and held the two panels in place with my hands.
    • There is a little bit of finagling that you have to do to keep pressure on the panels while getting the handle in place and screwed down. I wish I had had help for this step, but it's possible on your own.
      • It was during this step that I noticed there was a bunch of gunk built up on the outside panel under where the handles go. I never saw it before as I left the door face down the whole time. I cleaned it in place while holding the door, but in retrospect, I would have taken the outside glass out while the door was disassembled, turned it over and cleaned it.
    • The bottom 4 screws will zip right in.
  • Putting the door back on is just the reverse of the removal step above.
Thanks to Kurtiusinterupptus and Kdog for responding to my post.

I hope my additional ramblings above are of use to someone.

#6 KurtiusInterupptus

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 08:36 AM

;-D
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