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jlanadu

KitchenAid KESC307HBS8 - inline fuse problem

8 posts in this topic

Hello all,

The oven in my KitchenAid KESC307HBS8 won't heat up past 175F.

I checked the elements and I believe that all 4 are fine because they have the correct resistance (between 20 and 40).

Then I noticed that an inline fuse, on a red wire located immediately above the power cord entry box, has come loose from the upper portion of the wire. The fuse has continuity, and so I assume is not broken. I soldered the upper wire back to fuse, then turned on the oven to see if it would heat to 450F. A few minutes into the heat-up, the upper wire separated from the fuse again. I assume the solder is melting and releasing the upper wire. Is the solder unfit for such high temperature environments? I used 60% tin 40% lead. Or is the solder just fine, but the fuse is getting hotter than it should and so melting the solder?

Confounded.

Thanks, Jon

post-64217-0-89293900-1315263612_thumb.j

post-64217-0-39842400-1315263491_thumb.j

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RegUS_PatOff,

Thanks a lot for the advice. The harness sounds like the "officially correct" way to handle it.

I'll go that route if I have to, but I am very interested in the hi-temperature crimp connectors you mentioned. I'm a little confused though, because the ones that I have found by searching have looked like this:

HighTempTerms.jpg

http://www.elecdirect.com/catalog/e09d4f4e-1ecc-4f32-b6e7-a9143b14926c.aspx

How would I connect a wire to a fuse using those?

I have also seen in-line fuse holders:

764081&82&84.jpg

http://www.elecdirect.com/product/184c8186-47e4-4b62-a691-4c1bdb86cc3f.aspx

They seem perfect, but are described as for glass fuses, and the one I'm working with is ceramic. Also, the holders look like they are made of plastic, and I'm guessing that's not so good for a fuse that gets hot enough to melt solder...

Any thoughts on how I should use high-temp crimp connectors, or high-temp fuse holders?

Thanks very much for your help,

Jon

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OK... actually I don't think they need to be hi-temp,

I was thinking of some Electric Dryer Heater connection repair..

Is that connection in a hot location ?

The solder may not have held if you didn't twist / crimp / made a mechanical connection before soldering.

Did the solder actually melt ?

If not in a hot location, an in-line Fuse Holder should work.

Ceramic Fuses are the same size (should be used)

OR, they do make Fuses with "pigtail" wires..

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RegUS_PatOff,

Thanks for the reply. I appreciate the help.

"Is that connection in a hot location ?"

I don't think so; it's behind the oven, outside of the insulation.

"The solder may not have held if you didn't twist / crimp / made a mechanical connection before soldering."

I didn't do any of those things. I've got the end of a wire and the end of a fuse. I can't see how I would twist or crimp or make a mechanical connection. I am wide open to suggestions on how to do that.

"Did the solder actually melt ?"

Yep. I sat there and watched it.

I will check out the fuses with pigtail wires.

"If not in a hot location, an in-line Fuse Holder should work."

I like this idea. Will I need to make sure the gauge of the fuse holder wire is up to the voltage? I believe it's 220. The fuse itself is a 250V fuse.

Thanks again,

Jon

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... need to make sure the gauge of the fuse holder wire is up to the voltage?

voltage = insulation size

amperage = wire size

20A 250V

pRS1C-2265099w345.jpg

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RegUS_PatOff,

Thanks! I'm ordering that today.

If I have any interesting results, I'll be sure to post them.

Jon

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RegUS_PatOff,

Done. Fixed. Cooking!

The fuse holder you suggested has done the trick.

Thanks so much for your help.

Jon

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