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gregger77

Kenmore Elite Trio, bottom freezer, 596.78582803 - Ice is covering freezer bottom, water on floor

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I have a Kenmore Elite trio (bottom-mount freezer), model 596.7857*, about one year old, and lately we are noticing puddles of water on the floor near the left front. Inside, the bottom of the freezer section is completely covered with about a half-inch of ice. The puddles appear about once a day, no particular timing. There is a frozen "water trace" going up the left back corner of the freezer cabinet.

I can't see how/where the water is exiting the fridge; somewhere underneath? I can't see the condenser drip pan underneath.

1) Should I chip away all the ice and see if I can find a drain that's blocked? Where is the water coming from that's getting frozen?

2) How is the water actually reaching the kitchen floor?

Thanks!

Edited by gregger77

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

1) Should I chip away all the ice and see if I can find a drain that's blocked? Where is the water coming from that's getting frozen?

2) How is the water actually reaching the kitchen floor?

1 yes very carefully, you will need to remove the evaporator cover also, so that you can find the drain. I usually use a steamer, or a hair dryer, or hot water to remove the build up of ice. another words dont use something that could damage the liner of the fridge.

2 its running between the door seal and the cabinet moer than likely

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Thanks. I would guess that the evaporator cover is basically at the rear wall or floor off the freezer compartment...and also guess that I have to remove the freezer drawer to remove it. Anyone familiar with this model?

Thanks!

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yes you need to pull out the drawer, and yes it is the back wall of the freezer. I cant locate a break down at this time sorry.

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Evaporator Cover # 11

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Perfect, thanks guys. Will let you know how I make out.

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Hi guys,

I am very sorry, it occurred to me I didn't leave a follow up. I disassembled everything; took the drawer front off, then the drawer liner. Disconnected and removed the ice maker. Took out the inside back panel to reveal the condensor Removing Part 21 on the diagram is a pain, gotta push in on clips on either side (look for the molded symbol for a screwdriver); I snapped the center clip off by accident.

Anyway, I then used a hair dryer to melt away all the ice in the freezer bottom, and the "trough" leading to the drain...couldn't even see the drain until a lot of ice had melted. I used a turkey baster to "bail out" water from the trough and the drain. Then, when convinced all the ice was gone, I ran a 3' length of clear 1/4" rubber tubing (left over from our fish tank days) in and out of the drain and until I was convince the line was totally clear. Then put everything back together again.

I would love to know how to prevent this from happening, because resolving this was a huge P.I.T.A. (a couple hours' work, very hard on the knees!) and I would have to do it yearly. Our fridge is not EVEN a year old!!!

-- G.

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Drain tube may have just been clogged with a frozen pea....

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http://www.repaircli...p/819043/726493 Should be able to fit one of these probes to heater, which then gets directed into the tube so that heat will aid to prevent icing, Click on Link above

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