harry12345

GE Washer WBXR1060T2WW fills then stops

19 posts in this topic

my GE washer was in the agitation process when my wife opened the lid and threw another piece of clothes in it. When she closed the lid the washer did not turn on again. I was able to get some of the water out and it started to fill again but stops once the water level is at the correct level I checked the water level switch and it is working correctly. Any suggestions before I call the repair man.

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Hello, my suggestible friend.  The failure pattern you describe is the classic pathology of a lid switch which failed in use. 

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I tested the switch(continuity and voltage) and it seems to work perfectly.

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Hello again, my perfect friend.  Have you tried a jumper wire across the lid switch contacts?  Just a thought from an old herder of camels and yaks who fought with the Mujahideen and procured poppy products for your Ameedican CIA. 

If that results in no change, I recommend testing the contacts on the pressure switch and timer.  If you would be so kind and to post the wiring diagram for your washer, I will gladly assist you in identifying the exact locations you need to test.

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Wish I had a wiring diagram. I tested the switch by measuring the voltage on each side of the connector coming off the switch with the lid open and closed. with it open the voltage was close to zero. with the lid closed it was 114.9 so i know the lid switch is working. I traced the wire to the circuit board on the back of the control panel and it has 114.9 volts when the lid is closed. I also tested the water level switch hile it was filling and when full. It works fine. 114.9 volts to the inlet valves and o on the other terminal when it is filling and 0 volts to the inlet valves and 114 volts on the other terminal when it is full. traced the purple wire from the level switch to the timer and it has 114 volts at the connector to the timer. tried an old timer that i had and it does the same thing so i don't beleive the timer is bad.

not sure what the circuit board on the back of the control panel is. Any thoughts.

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Hello, my thoughtful friend.  Any other musings at this point would be mere guesses.  I am afraid we are at the point where we will need the wiring diagram to track the problem down further.  Usually is it located inside the control panel.  If no, then you can purchase a replacement from the Great Satan, GE, for 11 of your Ameedican Federal Reserve Notes.

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There may be another two tests that you could do.

1) Drain all the water. Advance the timer to "spin" and note whether it spins or not.

2) Measure the voltage at the terminals of the drive motor when it is supposed to be ON.

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Harry,

    The force says it is possible when your wife threw that last article of clothing into the washer she dislodged your lid switch actuator

Sometimes the white oval paddle on the lid switch assembly gets dislodged.

Open and close the lid.  Do you hear the lid switch clicking?

00013201.jpg

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When I advance the timer switch it does nothing at all.

Have not tried to measure the voltage at the drive motor. hopefully I'll get a chance later today.

The switch is working fine. I measured the voltage and current while opening and closing the lid.

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there are 5 wires on the drive motor. 2 on the left side a yellow one and a orange one, and 3 on the right side:blue red and black. they all read 115 volts with respect to ground.

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Problem is fixed. Repairman came out yesterday. First diagnosis was the timer which he didn't have with him so back to the shop he went. After a replacing the timer and seeing that the problem was still there he took a small circuit board off the back panel and noticed that a soldered electrical connection had loosened up. Again he went back to the shop to fix it. Not sure why this happened but all he did was resolder it and it works($65 later). I'll have to keep an eye on it and see if something else caused it.

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You got off light and found a decent repair guy, too!

Thanks for the followup report. :cheers:

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     That extra bit of circuitry on that model is there to count basket rotations during wash.  It's used to detect brake failure and stop the machine before it floods.

 

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Having problems again with the circuit board. The repairman came and get it and is trying to re-solder the connections. Does anyone have the part number for this circuit board(I cannot find it on any diagrams)? I read that this board can be bypassed by connecting two wires(numbers 1 and 4) on the vertical connector. Has anyone tried this?

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A bit of background on this:

The early versions of the "newer" GE washers had a Hall-Effect device attached to the transmission to, as Jedi pointed out, count basket rotations (over-engineered or what?). Reference to this is made in the documentation which comes with the replacement transmissions (which don't have this "feature"). I believe that it was simply a case of leaving it disconnected if the transmission was replaced.

As to what you do if the board itself fails, that's another matter. Like yourself, I can't see this referred to on any of the online parts breakdowns. Jedi (who sees more GE than most of us) may know what to do. Other than him, best suggestion I can offer is to make a call to the people at RepairClinic.com on 1-800-269-2609. If anyone can help, they can.

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   Thank you for the vote of confidence Master Mad Mac.  I have only seen this board maybe 5 times.  It was a temporary fix.  They weren't in production very long until they figured out they used the wrong grease on the transmission bearings and that is why the brakes were failing.   And yes the first one I ran into got a timer and a call back out of me also.    If you are able to post your tech sheet I'm sure the Great Moostafa would have no trouble figuring out how to bypass the extra circuitry.  I would like to see what you read telling you how to bypass it.  Are we sure this board is bad or is it simply doing it's job? Although I haven't received any visions lately, the Force is telling me your machine is around 10 years old. 

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the repair man fixed the soldering again. Said it is do to the parts on the board heating up and unsoldering the connections. total cost $58. He didn't look up the part number or the cost for me. Unfortunately I don't have the wiring diagram for the machine to show you how to bypass it but I found this link that I think explains how to do it. Without the wiring diagram I'm not sure what the fix does. It's fixed for now. Last time the resoldering lasted a year so it gives me some time to look for a replacement washer. Any suggestions?

http://www.applianceaid.com/image/1and4connector.JPG

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It all comes flooding back now...that's the sheet that comes with the replacement transmission. Jumping 1 to 4 effectively bypasses the board. Frankly, it's bloody miraculous that this is all that's gone wrong with your machine.

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That explains why I didn't remember seeing it.  I haven't read the sheet that comes with the transmission in years,  I actually have fun doing them.  If I'm in a real hurry I can do one in about an hour but I usually take about an hour and forty.

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