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Overheating GE model DWSR463EG0WW


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16 replies to this topic

#1 j-dizzle

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Posted 06 December 2011 - 10:38 PM

I have a GE Dryer (model DWSR463EG0WW) that began overheating this week. It smells like "burning" in less than a minute of starting a cycle and the top becomes too hot to touch.
I have disassembled the dryer and used the shopvac to clean all lint areas, I also removed the rear vent.

After removing the drum, I tested the resistance on all the thermostats and they appeared to be working. I then ran the dryer (without the drum) to examine the heating element. All coils get red hot within seconds and immediately smell like 'burning'. If I switch the settings to a "no heat, fluff cycle" the dryer runs fine and no heat moves through the coils.

I am at a loss. I thought it was a cycling thermostat problem, but then when the OHMs checked out okay I got confused. Also, the high limit thermostat never seemed to trigger any automatic shut off, regardless of the high temps.

Please help!! Dryer is in pieces and even though it's a GE, I need this piece of crap to work!

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#2 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 06 December 2011 - 11:35 PM

Testing the resistance on the thermostats doesn't tell the whole story. The thermostat probably tested closed when you checked it's continuinty. All well and good. But it's supposed to open when the air gets to a certain temperature, usually around 165F. If it doesn't, the dryer will run much hotter because the heater will be cycling on the high limit instead of the cycling thermostat. How does checking continuity at room temperature tell you anything about this?  

Looks like your dryer has two cycling thermostats:

- One on the blower housing ==> http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Cycling-Thermostat/WE4M216/276485?modelNumber=DWSR463EG0WW

- And another ==> http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Cycling-Thermostat/WE4M181/276464?modelNumber=DWSR463EG0WW

Both have internal bias heaters that would need to be checked (resistance).

You can test the main contacts on the thermostat using an electric skillet. Set the thermostat in the skillet with the metal face down. Set skillet for 180F. If thermostat doesn't open by the time the skillet thermostat kicks off, the thermostat is bad. 

#3 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 06 December 2011 - 11:39 PM

... I tested the resistance on all the thermostats and they appeared to be working.
... All coils get red hot within seconds and immediately smell like 'burning'.
... If I switch the settings to a "no heat, fluff cycle" the dryer runs fine and no heat moves through the coils.

1) "appeared to be working" ... opens at the designed temperature ?
2) note: Dryer Cabinet has to be assembled for proper air-flow / thermal cycling
3) that's a good test ... Heater isn't shorted to chassis
Has this Dryer worked OK for you, up till now, at this location ?
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#4 j-dizzle

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 09:16 PM

Please forgive the basic way that I will explain my results, but this is the first time i've used a multimeter.

So, at room temp when the leads aren't touching anything, the meter reads 1. Then when testing both thermostats at room temp, the meter jumps to 0 (closed right?)

When putting the cycling thermostats on the the electric skillet at about 180 degrees...The cycling thermostat on the blower housing doesn't change after the skillet heats up, it stays at 1 on the meter and never moves. However, the cycling thermostat that is located on the heating element, continues to register as 0 multimeter, even as the skillet heats to 180+.

So, is the thermostat located on the heating element the broken one? (because it stays closed regardless of temp?)

Also, do I need to be checking anything on the high limit thermostat or anywhere else. I am only concerned because I thought the high limit thermostat was supposed to throw a fuse or something when it got too hot?

Lastly, to answer the previous question, the dryer has worked fine in it's current location for the past 5 years until this event started.

Thanks for all the help so far...you guys are great!!

#5 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 10:21 PM

... smells like "burning" in less than a minute of starting a cycle and the top becomes too hot to touch.
... All coils get red hot within seconds and immediately smell like 'burning'.

1) it shouldn't smell like burning after only a few minutes, unless there is lint or something that is actually burning.
2) Coils should get hot within a minute, and usually stay ON for a few minutes or longer, till the Vent temperature gets to about 165F

... when testing both thermostats at room temp, the meter jumps to 0
... The cycling thermostat on the blower housing doesn't change after the skillet heats up, it stays at 1 on the meter
... the cycling thermostat that is located on the heating element, continues to register as 0 multimeter, even as the skillet heats to 180+./
... I thought the high limit thermostat was supposed to throw a fuse or something when it got too hot?

1) OK
2) i thought you said (both) thermostats read 0 at room temperature
3) there's (3) different Thermostat (Fuses) on the Heater Element, that will "blow" when they get too hot.
4) the High Limit Thermostat is a Fuse that will blow when it gets too hot and shut off the Motor and/or the Heater
.

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#6 j-dizzle

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 11:25 PM

1) OK 2) i thought you said (both) thermostats read 0 at room temperature 3) there's (3) different Thermostat (Fuses) on the Heater Element, that will "blow" when they get too hot. 4) the High Limit Thermostat is a Fuse that will blow when it gets too hot and shut off the Motor and/or the Heater





Sorry I was confusing when trying to explain...let me try again.

#2) both thermostats read 0 when tested at room temp. Then when I heated the cycling thermostat (from the blower area) up to 165F, it read 1. When the cycing thermostat (attached to the heating element) was heated to 165F+, it read 0.
- just a note... the multimeter is reading 1 when the meter was at rest, ie. when the leads were not touching anything and it was marked to measure resistance.

#3) so should I test the other 2 fuses (thermostats) on the top of the heating element? Would I test by heating them to 165F and checking resistance?

#4) if the high limit fuse didn't shut off the motor, it probably didn't blow right? So that would mean that it's not getting too hot?

Additionally, the coils do smell like burning immediately and they look a little black/charred in one area. Do you think I need a new heating element since the coils seem to be creating the smell? Is the heating element worth replacing on this POS dryer?

thanks again for the appliance education!

#7 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 05:30 AM

... if the high limit fuse didn't shut off the motor, it probably didn't blow right? So that would mean that it's not getting too hot?
... the coils do smell like burning immediately and they look a little black/charred in one area. Do you think I need a new heating element since the coils seem to be creating the smell?
... so should I test the other 2 fuses (thermostats) on the top of the heating element? Would I test by heating them to 165F and checking resistance?

1) it may be OK
2) they may be "smelling" for some other reason..
3) only test these Thermostats

should "open" at about 135F
http://www.repaircli...?R=154&N=276485

 

00647651.jpg

should "open" at about 210F
http://www.repaircli...?R=154&N=276464

 

00935554.jpg

Have you ever measured the temperature at the Vent ?
Vent should be rigid metal.
Short lengths of flexible metal may be OK, if not crimped when moving the Dryer into place.
NO plastic
NO PVC
NO screws
Foil Duct Tape is OK.
With an empty load, Timed Dry, High Heat, the vent temperature should cycle somewhere between 135F and 160F
Check / clean the Dryer Vent
Disconnect the Dryer Vent and check for good air-flow there and where it exits the house.
Check the Vent air temperature at the back of the Dryer.

 


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#8 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 07:18 AM

How to test a dryer cycling thermostat ==> http://fixitnow.com/...ing-thermostat/

#9 j-dizzle

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 11:25 AM

Thanks so much for the video, that is exactly the explanation I needed.

Looks like i am off to order the cycling thermostat that goes on the heating element, since the fuse is not "opening" when heated above 200F.

Also, just FYI, I checked the ventilation prior to removing the drum and taking apart the dryer. It blows well and the vent meets all the qualifications re: materials, connections, etc.

I will report back after receiving my parts but please let me know if you think there is anything else I should check prior to trying to restring the belt (without a rear access)!!

Thanks for your wisdom Samurai!

#10 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 12:21 PM


... since the fuse is not "opening" when heated above 200F.
there's (3) thermal devices on the Heating Element.
There's a difference between the Thermostats and the Fuses.,
The Thermostats "open" at 210F +- 5%
The Fuses are "one-time" and are not re-settable ...


Have you ever measured the temperature at the Vent ?
Vent should be rigid metal.
Short lengths of flexible metal may be OK, if not crimped when moving the Dryer into place.
NO plastic
NO PVC
NO screws
Foil Duct Tape is OK.
With an empty load, Timed Dry, High Heat, the vent temperature should cycle somewhere between 135F and 160F
Check / clean the Dryer Vent
Disconnect the Dryer Vent and check for good air-flow there and where it exits the house.
Check the Vent air temperature at the back of the Dryer.



.

one of my video productions: “Easter Seals: Walk With Me”

every day is Down Syndrome Awareness Day
"A Child Is Waiting" . Burt Lancaster . Judy Garland . 1962

RegUS_PatOff > www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPAY2LsKVEw

#11 j-dizzle

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 02:21 PM

Thanks for the clarification. It's the cycling thermostat on the heating element that I tested by heating. It's the one that didn't open when heated to 200F. I haven't done anything to the two fuses on the heating element because the dryer will still turn on, so I was guessing they had not blown. Correct? Or should I be doing something to the fuses as well?

#12 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 03:55 PM

The Cycling Thermostat is the "red" one in the pictures above,
located on the Blower Housing
135F
.

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#13 kdog

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 08:33 PM

I checked the ventilation prior to removing the drum and taking apart the dryer. It blows well and the vent meets all the qualifications re: materials, connections, etc.


The best test is trying Dryer performance with it disconnected. If you are watching heater with the Dryer disassembled or the Door open - the heater will quick cycle as you describe. Did you happen to use your ohmeter on the Coils of the Heater (and to ground) while you were in there ?
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#14 j-dizzle

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 09:17 PM

I have not yet tested the heating element for ohms or if it's grounded, but that's in my plans for tomorrow. Any instructions or tips would appreciated!

#15 kdog

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 09:56 PM

If Dryer has been reassembled, test run Dryer without vent first - if you look at the heater coils, there are 2 and a common - each leg should be roughly the same - and the 2 combined add to each other - also measure all of the pins to the metal housing - should be absolutely open circuit - elements will sag between the insulators, and can break or touch the shield when they stretch. Poor venting can cause this to happen by overheating the element.
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#16 j-dizzle

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 09:34 PM

So, I checked the continuity of the heating element and got a reading of 39 when touching each of the terminals. The OHMs were set to the lowest resistance (200) but I am thinking 39 is not what I should have gotten.

I also checked each terminal pin individually against the heater housing to see if it was grounded, but both were completely open. The top of the element looks charred like it might have been burnt due to grounding, but I guess grounding isn't the issue since the OHMs checked out okay.

Thoughts?

#17 j-dizzle

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 09:32 PM

Update on the heating element...

So, I checked the resistance of the heating element again and it appears okay. Each individual coil leg tested 19 and then both tested 39 together. So, I think it's correct since it's pretty much the doubled amount. I then tested each coil leg to the housing and they were completely open, so no grounding.

However, the heating element is still charred in the top section and it smells like burning immediately when it starts. This makes me wonder if it got charred when the control inlet thermostat failed and now it just continues to smell like burning because it is charred.

So, I was thinking maybe I would replace the control inlet thermostat (item#276464) because it fails to open at 210F.
Also, then replace the heating element coils (item#824395) in order to remedy the charred coils and burning smell.

All the other thermostats checked out fine and I do not think any fuses were blown because the dryer still operates fine.

Any thoughts re: my plans!! I really appreciate all the help, you are saving me tons of $ in repair costs plus I feel like I understand how my dryer works for any future issues!




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