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Doesn't drain but pump OK, Bosch dishwasher she44c06uc/22


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7 replies to this topic

#1 Tim M

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 04:12 PM

. OK, I thought it was going to be an easy service call. Brought my laptop just in case, but it turns out the SHE models aren't on the dishwasher guides I have. Then the tech sheet didn't say how to enter diagnostic mode, it only had wiring diagrams. So I copied what seemed to be a universal way. I pressed 2nd and 4th buttons while pressing on, then I pushed 2nd and 4th again. It seemed to but didn't advance.

. So here is what seems to happen. Start a cycle. The preliminary pump out doesn't happen, but I do hear a few clicks from the control board. Let it fill. Press cancel and drain. Still doesn't pump out.

. I'd already checked for obstructions, so I hooked the pump directly up to current, and it works like a charm. Hooked just the hot wire up, leaving neutral running through the machine, and still pumps perfectly. Checked continuity of gray wire up to first position in control panel, and that's OK. Measured voltage coming off of control panel both off the panel and off the gray wire that connects to pump. Usually around 40V, sometimes 120V. Thought it might be a fraction of an amp, so I hooked a 75W lightbulb up to the wires and not even the faintest glow, and a 0 amp reading.

. The owner had said he used to be able to get it to pump out if he started and stopped it a few times, but now he had to drain with a turkey baster. I think the main motor isn't running as well. He might have said something about that.

. So I'm beginning to think it is the control board, but don't want to mess around with the parts changing monkey approach.

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#2 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 04:32 PM

... Usually around 40V, sometimes 120V.

... all voltage measurements should be made with the load connected..
It may be a bad solder joint on the Controller
.

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#3 Tim M

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 05:03 PM

... all voltage measurements should be made with the load connected..
It may be a bad solder joint on the Controller


. I had a look at the controller, and I didn't see any bad joints.

. If I'm measuring voltage to the pump, don't I have to disconnect the leads in order to hook them up to a voltage meter?

#4 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 05:13 PM

... all voltage measurements should be made with the load connected..

may have to improvise extention leads to your Meter..
OR measure at another point... pins on the Controller if accessable
.

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#5 Tim M

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 05:30 PM

I measured off the hot pin on the controller to ground and neutral. I measured off leads into pump, though, yes, they disconnected from the pump at the time.

As for a load, I hooked a lightbulb up to the power coming from the control board and got not even the faintest glow. Occasionally, the voltmeter is going to show voltage where there is no amperage to back it up. In that case, the only solution I know of is to put a load in the circuit that will test it, like a lightbulb. What do you expect to see if you measure the voltage across the two connections to the pump while connected?

If the solder joint was bad, I should have seen something visible, shouldn't I? Or is this not like the case of the heater relay joint going bad, where it is so very noticeable?

#6 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 05:32 PM

If I'm measuring voltage to the pump, don't I have to disconnect the leads in order to hook them up to a voltage meter?


Nyet, tovarish! You can sneak them skinny-azz meter probes in there and get a bite on the metal long enough to make a voltage reading. May have to unclip a cover or you sneak 'em in from the back of the connector, where the wires go in. Many ways to skin this cat, got a whole bed made out of cat skin to prove it!

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#7 Comstock_Services

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 05:39 PM

So if I understand correctly, you have lost the hot lead to the drain pump, correct? I would try to plug into the back of the connector, while hooked to0 the pump, if still no hot lead, check it back to the board, if no power from board. I'd say slam dunk board, but double check the wire first.

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#8 Tim M

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Posted 13 January 2012 - 09:55 AM

Problem solved.

. As everything indicated, it was the control board. Whether you get 30V or 120V coming out of the control panel, when there isn't enough amperage for even a faint glow to a lightbulb, something in there just isn't doing its job.




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