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Intermittent filling problem with Maytag MDB9100 AWB JETCLEAN DISHWASHER EQ - Plus!

intermittent filling

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50 replies to this topic

#41 drcarl

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 03:38 PM

(1) How much current is needed to open the valve?

A friend says that 95 VAC should be enough to power the magnets; (2) Is it?

He also mentions that I should connect a test cord directly to the valve to see if it opens.

(3) what's a test cord?

(4) should I test the valve with a test cord?

Methinks this valve testing is ground already covered; of course, please correct me if I am mistaken.

(I kind of plan to replace the valve if the problem persists after installing a second refurbed control board)

THANK YOU for sharing your expertise

~drcarl

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#42 kdog

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 10:34 PM

Cheater Cord

Good idea - enrgize is for several fill cycles, and drain the machine in between - if it's a bad valve it'll fail on ya like it does when operated - I have seen valves refuse to work below 105 volts

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#43 drcarl

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 09:02 PM

kdog, thank you for essentially answering all of my questions! Sometimes I think I ask too many (that's partially why I number them; it's also to make specific answers more convenient)

I made a cheater/test cord out of an old computer power cord and attached it securely to the valve's power prongs. When I plugged her in the first time, she filled as expected. I drained her, and filled her this way a second time and got a complete fill. I performed the second drain, and then, when I plugged-in my cheater cord for a third fill, I got............nothing, zero, nada, zilch.

Looks like I'll be reaching for my Teflon tape once I order and receive a new valve.

I am still concerned that the power supplied to the valve is 112VAC for the first fill, then halfway through the second fill (and for subsequent fills) it drops to 95VAC. If, once I receive and install it, the second refurbished master control board acts this way with a voltage drop, (just like the first refurb I installed and the board I have now), I'll be sending it back for a refund.

Something tells me that if three boards are acting the same way, it's not the board, and that since the valve failed after the second fill when powered with 120 VAC directly, well, you guessed it spot-on in your first post, it's the valve!

Thank you for your input!

~drcarl

#44 kdog

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 10:03 PM

We'll be interested to see how it turns out

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#45 drcarl

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 11:54 PM

For the official record: it was the valve (though I am baffled how a valve can make the VAC drop)

Thank you for all your input!

~drcarl

#46 SANTA

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 12:08 AM

Wow! This problem could have been solved with the first post from kdog. Sometimes overthinking a problem causes total confusion. :unsure: Oh well, chalk it up to a learning experience. :thumbsup:

#47 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 12:16 AM

Wow! This problem could have been solved with the first post from kdog. Sometimes overthinking a problem causes total confusion.


Wisdom! Let us attend!

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#48 kdog

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 12:23 AM

Thanks for updating the post - I'm certain it will help others in the future. Ironically, I have seen several occasions where the voltage supplied by the control was below 100 volts and just would not open the valve. We can take from this that the simple way to determine this outcome would have been to simply hook a known good valve to the valve terminals (vlave loose,in-hand, no water hookup) and make the voltage measurement a second time with the sample connected. If the voltage was then good - go ahead and commence with it's installation.

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#49 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 12:47 AM

For the official record: it was the valve
(though I am baffled how a valve can make the VAC drop)

a Valve with a few (or more) shorted windings can draw more current than the Controller can handle,
and would strain the Driver Transistor on the Controller, to a point where the voltage would be reduced.
If enough windings were shorted, it could blow the Controller.

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#50 drcarl

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 04:52 AM

I have been guilty of over thinking. Oh, well.

I still wonder how a valve can screw-up the VAC.

THANKS to all

~drcarl

RegUS_PatOff - just saw your post. *bows* THANK you for a real answer.


And, again, thanks to all else who helped

~drcarl

#51 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 10:01 AM

if you still have the old Valve,
measure it's resistance OHMs, and compare it to the new Valve

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