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Rotozip... basically useless POS


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3 replies to this topic

Poll: What to do? (4 member(s) have cast votes)

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  1. Burn it in the trash bin? (0 votes [0.00%])

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  2. Sell it on Ebay? (1 votes [25.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 25.00%

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#1 nickfixit

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 08:06 AM

A few years back I bought me one of them Rotozip tools. On the infomercial, they showed it cutting all kinds of stuff and looking generally usefull. In real life it's a pethetic, slow, weak pile of monkey dung. Every few years I drag it out for some easy project just to remind myself what a waste of money it is.

This time I was cutting a hole in a hollow core door, well I was trying to anyways. It's hollow with a 1/8' skin of plywood, but alas to much for the wonder tool to handle. By working slow and carefull, I was able to cut out almost 1/3 of my cat door project and only broke 2 bits. As usual, I curse out the foul thing and went after the Dewalt jigsaw to complete this huge project that was too much for the mighty Rotozip.

It doth truly sucketh.

Nick
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#2 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 08:52 AM

I bought a Roto-Zip tool about 10 years ago and it worked great for the projects I had.
Be sure to use Roto-Zip bits.. not just any drill bits nor router bits.
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#3 nickfixit

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 05:45 AM

I only ever used roto-zip bits, I still thought it was slow and weak. Mine was bought before the company was bought by Bosch. maybe that's the problem. It's not much more power than a dremel. I love my dremels, but I don't use them to cut anything except small items with the cut-off wheel.
" Giving numerical data to Sears management is like giving a monkey a machine gun. No one knows for certain what will happen, but you can be sure of two things... It will be real messy, and only the monkey will be unharmed"

#4 neurodoc

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 09:48 PM

Old topic. The Roto-Zip is probably an over-rated tool...because the advertizing suggests it is a sort of "do it all" routing/cutting

tool. It isn't, but I've found it good for a couple of tasks: 1) cutting electrical box openings in sheetrock; and, 2) routing out grout

and cutting openings in tiled walls when doing plumbing repairs. You need to use the correct bits (spiral for cutting box openings

in sheetrock, and carbide for the tile work). You also need to move the tool in the correct direction (opposite to the bit rotation) to

control the tool while cutting an opening). Forget about using it for cutting plywood, metal, formica, etc., as such cuts will be sloppy

and there are better tools for those applications...e.g. jig saws,trim saws, and mini-routers (I like Bosch and Porter-Cable).






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