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ronniewoo

Whirlpool Dryer GEW9868KQ2 - No Heat

14 posts in this topic

My domestic bliss is at stake. Please help!

Symptom: No heat in Whirlpool Dryer GEW9868KQ2

Solutions Already Tried:

1) Reamed out the exhaust duct.

2) Used ammeter to check Thermal cut-off and High-Level Thermostat. Found that one of them (can't remember which) was bad. I also checked another similar component (can't remember the name) that is installed away from the heating element--toward the center front bottom of the unit--it was still good.

3) Used ammeter to check the heating element and found it measured a normal 10.5 Ohms.

4) Jumpered across the dead part and confirmed that heating element would then heat up properly.

5) Ordered and replaced both components in the "Thermal Cut-Off Kit", 279769 and 3977394.

6) Function was restored to normal--Happy wife!

7) Today received call at work that symptom has returned (two weeks later)--no heat--Unhappy wife.

8) Without testing the parts (I'm still at work), I have concluded that the Thermal Cut-Off failure was a symptom of a bigger problem, not the root cause. Thus, it is likely that the same part failed again.

I have read that a stuck cycling switch may be to blame...

I could purchase an entire new element with thermal cut-off kit included and try that, but I'm not optimistic that this is the root cause either.

Help! Thank you.

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

3) Used ammeter to check the heating element and found it measured a normal 10.5 Ohms.

normal reading, but must also test Heating Element for partial short to chassis (ground)

(ammeter is terminology for amp meter .. you were using the OHM meter function)

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You're right. Although I can't remember for 100% certain, I am pretty sure that I did check for conductivity between the element and the chassis (with the ohm-meter, not ammeter!). It was open. I definitely do remember looking for a droop in the coil of the element where it might be touching the chassis, and it was not. I assume (probably incorrectly) that if there were a short, it would not have worked for two weeks after the repair, but maybe it just needed that much time to short out again. But I hope there are other possible explanations, because I don't think the element was shorted to ground... Thanks!

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... I definitely do remember looking for a droop in the coil of the element where it might be touching the chassis, and it was not.

... I assume (probably incorrectly) that if there were a short, it would not have worked for two weeks after the repair,

1) not a definite test .. the Element mag "sag" more when "hot"

2) yes, it could .. if it was partially shorted to chassis, it could work OK as long as the Blower (Drum Motor) was running,

If you open the Door and the Drum Motor (and Blower) stop, the Heating Element is still partially energized, causing heat, without the Blower.

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So is your recommendation to go ahead and replace the heating element, along with the two thermal cut-off kit parts that plug into the side wall of the heating element? (Do those two parts come included when you buy the heating element?)

Or is there more troubleshooting to be done before making this repair?

Are there any other common causes of "no heat" symptom, other than shorted heating element?

Any merit to the "stuck cycling switch" theory?

Thanks. :thumbsup:

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... So is your recommendation to go ahead and replace the heating element,

... along with the two thermal cut-off kit parts that plug into the side wall of the heating element?

... (Do those two parts come included when you buy the heating element?)

... Or is there more troubleshooting to be done before making this repair?

1) no

2) no

3) no

4) test to be sure there is no heat when set to run an "no-heat" Air Fluff Cycle

make sure the Heating Element turns OFF when the Door is opened

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Okay, to be sure I understand, you are advising this:

1) Get back into the unit and do some quick checks to confirm the same part burned out again and there is still no short between element and chassis. If element is shorted or burnt out, replace it--otherwise go to Step 2.

2) Jumper the failed part and confirm we get heat when running a "hot dry" cycle. If not, replace the element and the failed thermal cut-off kit--otherwise go to Step 3.

3) With the failed part still jumpered, run an Air Fluff Cycle and confirm that the element does not heat. If confirmed go to Step 4--if heat continues during Air Fluff cycle then ???

4) With the failed part still jumpered, run a hot dry cycle and then open the door while running to confirm that heating element turns off. If confirmed, then ???. If heating element does not turn off when door is opened then ???

Thanks!

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that's about right ..

we'll see when (if) we get there

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Got home, opened her up, and ran some tests. This time I found that the heating element was open--no continuity. Removed the entire assembly and found where the coil had burned in two pieces. The good news is that the Thermal Cut-off Kit parts are still good. So I think I just need to buy a new element and I'll be back in business.

I'm still a bit concerned about why the two failures back-to-back? I hope there isn't another root cause that resulted in both of these failures, and it is just a matter of time before it burns some other part up. Do you know what would cause successive failures of the Thermal Cut-Off and then the Heating Element?

Thanks a lot for your coaching on this.

- Bill

Indianapolis

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could be a coincidence or it could be that whatever caused the dryer to get hot enuff to blow the cutoff also weakened the element

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weak / broken Heater Element "sags" then maybe shorts to chassis = blows Thermal

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Dryer problems are usually pretty simple. (Though I had an Electrolux give me absolute fits once, but that's another story.)

The most common thing I see kill dryers (besides lint) is twisted tangled hose going from dryer to wall. I want a maximum of TWO right angle bends from the dryer to the wall. I've had customers say "oh it vents straight outside" and then I look down and see silver spaghetti behind the unit.

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While you were cleaning the dryer did you do a thorough vacuuming? Sometimes that lint gets into the heater element area and that causes the element to fail. If the element looks brittle it may have simply been time. Nothing last forever. Last halloween I repaired a dryer similar to yours and took a few photos:

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