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Most common dryer failure misconception?

Most common dryer failure mis

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5 replies to this topic

#1 trevorstorey

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 11:48 PM

I recently started working on appliances as a side gig and I must say the money is easy breezy!!! The come faster than you can fix em!

My question though to those respectable veterans of "THE MACHINE" whom so graciously run this website is a little diddy about dryers.

I quite frequently get people who call me out for a "No Heat dryer" or a "broken dryer, only to get there, turn the thing to 'cotton high heat' or the 'timed dry' setting, push to start and the thing runs like a gem!

I usually run the thing for 10-15 minutes to make sure I'm not crazy, check that the solenoid coils still work after they warm up if its gas, open the thing up and check the thermal fuse, cycling thermo, element, ingnitor, etc.

Question: Is there something I'm missing which would allow the dryer NOT to heat up for them but heat up fine for me?

Thanks

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#2 DurhamAppliance

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 01:07 AM

Have the customer show you the settings they are using. It could be they are using autodry etc and their moisture sensors are bad.

Durham Appliance Thrift & Repair, LLC

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#3 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 06:43 AM

Something that has tripped me up a couple of times in electric dryers is bad/burnt contacts in the heater circuit of the timer.

Every time I tested was getting full voltage and all temps OK. Would get a call back next day not drying again. Found the heater contacts failing to pass current after running a few loads and heating the contacts up real good. When I would show up it would be cold and work fine.
William Burk (Willie)
Willie's Budget Appliance Repair
Eureka, CA 95501

#4 Ritz

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 08:17 AM

That is sound advice Willie.
I drill a customer hard on the "no heat or broken dryer". I ask if its gas or electric first. Then I ask if there is any heat at all or completely cold after running for a few minutes. Most fess up and say it just takes forever like 3 hours for the clothes to dry. This usually tells me there is a venting issue and in order for them to save a service call fee to unhook the vent from the back of the dryer and try a load that way. If the clothes dry in the normal amount of time then you know you have a venting issue and vent cleaning service needs to be called.

Most people don't understand how important how a dryer needs to have a clear vent run.

#5 trevorstorey

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 01:18 PM

How do you test the contacts of the heater circuit on the timer? And if they test good when its cold how are you to know they are going bad when they get hot? Do you run it for 40+ min?

Thanks dudes!

#6 appl.tech.29501

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 02:24 PM

the time could very. Usually if the contacts in the timer are about shot you can jiggle the timer knob while ohming
those contacts and see a fluctution...i generally will do an amp measurement while the dryers running in heat
mode if I suspect the contacts. I typically see alot more of the GE dryer timers with (Intermittent) heat problems
rather than the Whirlpool....
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