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GE washer Timer Knob fits poorly


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12 replies to this topic

#1 Crouching Schnauzer

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 03:38 PM

Hi folks,

Here's one that has been bunching up my grey matter:

I have a GE washing machine for which I have just received a replacement Timer Knob from my local RepairClinic.com interweb store. I am replacing because the original has lost all its teeth, either due to poor oral hygiene or the fact that it's made of cheap plastic and fits poorly in the first place.

The root of the problem is that when the knob is in place on the machine, the teeth on the knob stem do not fully engage the corresponding teeth on the stem of the timer module. Holding both in my hand, the two parts fit together fine. But there is a plastic retaining clip that holds the plastic knob onto the metal pin coming from the timer module, and the groove on the knob stem does not line up accurately with the groove on the metal timer pin.

Now, we're only talking about a millimeter (literally) of difference in the alignment, but with these teeny cheapo plastic teeth not fully engaging, I expect the new knob will be down to the gums & eating applesauce sooner than the first. I did order an extra knob JIC, but my real concern is that the teeth on the Timer Module are also getting worn, and those suckers are about $90.

I see no way to replace or adjust the plastic, toothy stem piece on the Timer Module. Its a Kingston part, and is sealed in such a way that I know I'm not meant to be inside without permission.

Anyone have any ideas? Or am I just on borrowed time?

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#2 Crouching Schnauzer

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 03:48 PM

Sorry, forgot to say that the previous pics are of the old and new knobs, but maybe that's obvious.

Also, here's the timer stem:

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#3 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 05:37 PM

I'm not a Dentist, (and I don't play one on TV) :D
but it looks like you could use some Polident
Try Super Glue.. it may weld that type of plastic, yet won't normally stick to metal very good.
Although, the Knob may be grooved so as to not allow the Timer to be turned counter-clockwise

P.S. what's the Washer model number ?
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#4 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 09:27 PM

The mating teeth on the timer shaft have been affected as well. You'll need to replace the timer, too ==> http://www.repaircli...ard-Timer-Parts

#5 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 07:37 AM

I bet you could get away without replacing the timer with a little work on the damaged timer shaft teeth.

Remove the dial from the timer and take the clip off the new knob, smooth off the edges that should be flat with an exacto-knife and test fit the new knob until all the teeth engage down into the teeth on the timer shaft.

When you try to install the knob hold the metal timer shaft in from the back so that it is all the way extended out when you try to snap the new knob onto the shaft, (when in the pushed down off position and you try to install the knob the buggered up teeth aren't letting the new knob seat down all the way so that the retaining clip can snap into the grove on the shaft).
William Burk (Willie)
Willie's Budget Appliance Repair
Eureka, CA 95501

#6 Crouching Schnauzer

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 10:52 AM

Reg:
I like the super glue idea, but the knob needs to be able to pop out at the end of the cycle and spin freely when changing settings. GE machine model is WCSR2090G4WW.

Samurai:
The knob/timer situation is still functional, but not ideal. Applying a little extra pressure when turning the knob will cause the timer to turn; I just don't expect it to hold up since, as you said, the mating teeth on the timer are already boogered too. I'll probably just use this timer till I can't use it no more. Might as well get as much life out of it as I can, and continue collecting my .000000003 cents interest on that $90 in the meantime. Also, I feel like the fitment issue will still exist, even with a new timer. After all, these parts came this way (poorly fitting) in the first place, right?

Willie:
I think my original explanation may have been unclear. The misalignment of the grooves (where the retaining clip goes) on the timer pin and the knob is what is causing the teeth to not fully engage. The teeth on the timer and the new knob fit together fine until the retaining clip is in place.The groove on the pin is too "high," so that when the clip is in place, it lifts the knob teeth away from the timer teeth. Here's some more pics that may better explain:

If you look closely in the pic with the knob in place, inside the groove on the knob shaft, you can see where the groove on the pin is misaligned.

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#7 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 06:11 AM

Are you sure you ordered the correct knob?

You didn't supply any model numbers for us to verify anything!!!!!

From the picture of the old and new knob, they look the same, but they did make a couple different knob shaft lengths over the years.

The timer push/pull on/off shaft retainer where it clicks into one of the two positions for ON or OFF maybe buggered up so as not to let the metal rod push all the way down in to the off position. Have you looked at the back of the timer where I believe you can see the other end of the metal push on/off shaft to see if anything looks out of place.

Does the rod actually stop at that point and won't push down any further if you push in on the knob while turning to make sure the teeth stay fully engaged when changing cycles?

EDITED TO ADD: It's not that far off, I believe the problem is you let it go to long without replacing the knob and the teeth on the timer shaft are actually stripped off the tips about 1/16" or so which if they were fully intact would raise the knob up that slight bit to line up with the clip slot.

Edited by Budget Appliance Repair, 01 July 2012 - 06:15 AM.

William Burk (Willie)
Willie's Budget Appliance Repair
Eureka, CA 95501

#8 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 07:02 AM

but in his last picture, if he were to align the (white) Knob with the retainer clip grove,
the teeth on the Knob wouldn't (but should) bottom-out onto the Timer
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#9 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 05:41 AM

Are sure about that RegUS, I've never actually had the timer and knob off of a good one and noticed how far the teeth engage each other.

Maybe on new/undamaged parts the timer teeth are a little taller and bottom out in the knob teeth holding the knob teeth from bottoming out in the timer, the top 1/16" or so of the timer hub teeth being ripped up would lead me to that suggestion.
William Burk (Willie)
Willie's Budget Appliance Repair
Eureka, CA 95501

#10 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 06:40 AM

I'm not sure, but in his first post, his original Knob was ripped up also
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#11 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 07:19 AM

RegUs, that is what usually happens, the knob teeth start to strip out, (usually from people turning trying to turn the knob backwards or just cheap plastic parts start breaking).

It keeps getting used this way and causing more damage each time until the user is no longer able to turn the timer then they look into doing something about.

Not taking care of the problem when it first starts can turn a $10-$15 knob only problem into a $100 plus new timer problem.

It used to be when GE made a quality product you could rebuild the old clam shell style timers and replace the timer hub as a separate part for just a couple dollars and they also had a metal knob that never wore out.
William Burk (Willie)
Willie's Budget Appliance Repair
Eureka, CA 95501

#12 Crouching Schnauzer

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 10:06 AM

Willie, I see ur point about the original height of the timer teeth, but I don't believe they were any taller than the knob teeth. Even if they were, that still seems like poor design to me. The teeth should be the same height and fully engage, to keep stress off the tips, which are obviously weaker.

Also, I did indeed supply the machine model number above. Here is the part I ordered as well:
http://www.repaircli...1X10310/1264403

The part # is 2-3 digits different than the original part, but it is the one that came up when I searched with my orig part #. I gave them a THOROUGH visual comparison, and the two are otherwise identical.

The knob has only ever been turned in the proper clockwise direction when setting, and it gave no indication that it was worn until it was completely broken. I guess that last little tooth was the scrapper of the bunch. And yes, the gap isn't that far, but 1mm on a 2-3mm tooth makes enough difference to matter.

The back end of the timer shaft looks like some sort of plastic cap, or else it is another separate piece that is joined to the metal shaft. There is virtually no play in the shaft to move up or down. I had tried pressing it in farther in hopes of lining up the retaining clip grooves, but it won't budge. The timer module itself is secured by several plastic "welds," so that the inside is not accessible without grinding or breaking these off. However, if a new shaft/hub assembly were available, I would be willing to replace it. The module also has 4 snap together clips that could be reused.

Timer is a Kingston MST. Sorry, don't have any other part #, and the machine is put back together for now.

#13 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 07:20 AM

Something really weird/strange is going on. You have the correct knob and I pulled a timer and knob from a used console I have.

Timer teeth and knob teeth are both the same height and mesh fully with each other.

The timer I have is also a Kingston but a little different casing style, (the older grey - a little flatter and squared but basically the same).

With the timer push/pull shaft pulled fully out in the ON position the rear of the shaft on the back side of the timer is flush with the area it slides in/out of. If you take the clip off the knob and test fit it on the timer push/pull shaft the knob slides onto the shaft and stops right where the notch in the knob lines up with the notch in the shaft, (there are two plastic edge fins inside the knob hole that butt up against the wedge shaped end of the shaft so that it stops right at that point - it appears there might be something wrong with the new knob you have since the shaft is actually going into the knob too far and passing the clip slot).

The measurement on the knob I have is exactly 1/4" from the tip of the tooth to the front of the clip slot.

The measurement on the on/off push/pull shaft sticking out the back of the timer when in the off position is 1/8", there is 1/8" movement from off to on. Does your push/pull timer shaft have two distinct positions that it snaps into with the knob off?

On the timer without the knob on it, the measurement from the tip of the hub teeth to the edge of the clip notch is 3/16" in OFF position and 5/16" in ON position.

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William Burk (Willie)
Willie's Budget Appliance Repair
Eureka, CA 95501




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