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41 replies to this topic

#21 Scottthewolf

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 12:18 AM

I wouldn't do this job period unless somebody was willing to pay me $400 to do it. I've done too many of these when I worked for Maytag Factory Service. I usually got slapped with these jobs at least 2 or 3 times a week and sometimes on Saturdays when I just wanted to get home and start enjoying the weekend.
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#22 Mr. Lee Fix

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 12:50 AM

What is the job that your envisionning as it's not yet clear to me? What was it about these washers that manifested itself in such a high rate of failure? What is your diagnosis and how do I cure it? I want to startt enjoying my weekend as well, so I'm going to fix this thing, if it's possible, and Maytag isn't even paying me.... but they did give me the milk stool. Then I can relax in my house and do something enjoyable while the washer does the laundry. Budget Appliance had some good insight and ideas and that's where I need to start.

Mr. Lee Fix

#23 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 05:29 AM

Too make sure the brake is actually releasing, turn the pulley in the spin direction and watch for the brake pak to open up so it isn't holding against the three brake pads. If the brake is actually released you should be able to wiggle each of the brake pads slightly even without removing the bolt that holds the pads in.

You can remove the pads by just removing the one bolt that holds each pad in and then the pad should slip right out, unless the brake isn't actually releasing all the way, (maybe the helix is worn so it not releasing the brake all the way, but I still think things are binding because of the broken milk stool, did you look at all the spot welds on each leg to the middle plate?).

If you remove the pads then you know for sure the brakes aren't the problem, with the pads removed the transmission should rotate freely in either direction. If it won't then something is binding it up, the broken milk stool or a bad bearing.
William Burk (Willie)
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#24 Mr. Lee Fix

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 08:40 AM

I will do as you have suggested in your last two posts as your suggestions are clearly logical, controlled, and are moving forward. First though, I need to find out why the furnace won't run (but that's another forum). I've definitely got some work ahead. I can do this stuff....I just need to know what and how soemtimes as, although it may be intuitive, it's not all that clear and certainly a bit foreign to me.

Thank you for your your insight, experience and time. It is greatly appreciated.

William

#25 Mr. Lee Fix

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 02:03 PM

NEWSFLASH!! Removed motor as per http://appliantology...pliance-repair/ instructions (couldn’t have been easier) and attempted rotation of pulley. Rotated in the agitate mode only, but not in the spin mode. The brake engages upon ramp up as the disc moves up and the upper plate moves down. Used two hands and no go. Then turned with one hand on pulley and one on the transmission and it BROKE LOOSE. Now, it will rotate in either direction under hand power. Was it the brakes (don’t know ) the transmission/bearing (still don’t know) or a stool bind situation (sounds painful)? I’ll definitely replace the milk stool. What else should be replaced (other than the writer) as I don’t want a recurrence of the dreaded “Gotta Go To The Laundromat Blues”.
The pictures are of the following conditions: (Link below)
3624 - The S/S Tub 3623 - lower view of pulley 3622 - Lower view of transmission 3621 - Trans bearing upper & rear splatter 3620 - Trans bearing upper 3619 - Milk stool Pulley 3618 - Milk stool crack left side 3616 - Milk stool crack left side 3615 - Milk stool front side 3614 – Right side case splatter 3613 – Left side case splatter 3608 - Bearing mount plate corrosion (Under agitator)
Is the plate under the agitator good, as it had a bit of corrosion which I scraped off readily. I noticed that AMANA uses a “Loctite” glue fastener on their bolts. What is the correct one to use or should I just use a good one? Is there a way to readily separate the S/S inner drum from the plastic outer tub as I want to clean them spotless (I’m kind of anal about this stuff). I don’t think there is but I’m sensing a special tool requisition


http://s1268.photobu...577/Minolta101/

Thank you for help
Mr. Lee Fix (William)

Edited by Mr. Lee Fix, 02 August 2012 - 02:09 PM.


#26 Scottthewolf

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 02:17 PM

The tub bearing and seal are bad. Like I said, it's too much work especially since the proper tools are no longer available.
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#27 Mr. Lee Fix

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 12:25 AM

It's too much work? Since when is it too much work? The machine has worked exceedingly well and now I'm supposed to toss it out? I thought this was a repair forum not a shopping forum, and one that benefits when repair parts are purchased. You already stated your dissatisfaction with having to repair many such machines in the past so maybe you're rather biased, but I have no predisposition to hating this job...in fact I'm rather looking forward to it. I'll have the tools. That said, who out there can accurately diagnose the malady and make a positive plan recommendation of needed repairs as I don't want to miss anything? And I don't want to reopen the machine for any repairs that should have been done. I have no axe to grind with AMANA (nor Maytag for that matter, nor Whirlpool) so I'm reminded of a famous saying from the Land of the Rising Sun:

Monde De wa naku, hinan o shūsei shimasu

Arigato Sensei of the Sake
Mr. Lee Fix (William)

#28 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 06:33 AM

Looks like you already broke one of the four spin basket bolts off, (that's OK, the new hub and seal kit comes with new bolts and the new hub, that part you are worried about being corroded).

Keep going you can't make anything worse, from those pictures it's for sure the bearing was locked up, the seal has definitely been leaking and in the worst way just a little seepage and not enough to be seen to alert you to the problem until the bearing has locked up. The load sound of the spin cycle should have alerted you to a problem but you may just get used to it as it gets loader every time you use it.

Once the basket is out work the black rubber air bell/agitator shaft seal loose and you will find the large nut under it.

Next will be to have a short enough wrench that will fit the nut good and that you can smack real good with a sledge hammer.

Once you get the nut off there is plastic ring with teeth that is between the nut you just removed and the hub, you have to pry it out of there before you start to try and pull the hub.

If you can then set up some type of puller on the hub and get it out you will be pretty much home free, that's the worst part.

The new hub and seal kit is probably going to run any where between $50 - $125 depending on where you find it and the upper bearing another $15 - $30.

If you get the hub out remove the spring loaded section of the seal from the outer tub and make sure the sealing area isn't all rusted out, if it is it's not going to hold a new seal , (you may not have to worry about this in yours - you have a plastic outer tub I'm going from the metal tub one I worked on recently).

The new hub and seal kits comes with a very good instruction sheet and also the 3M 800 sealant that you will need if you get a genuine part and not some cheap aftermarket one.

Reinstalling the new agitator/air bell seal is what I mentioned in my previous post that I use a piece of 1 1/2" outside dia. PVC kitchen sink plumbing pipe and a piece of 2" inside dia PVC drain/waste/vent pipe to reinstall in place of the special tool. Take the seal with you to a hardware store and match up sizes that match it.

The upper transmission bearing maybe frozen onto the transmission also from the leakage but you can remove the bearing by removing the three bolts on tri-mounting plate and remove it still attached to the transmission when you pull the milk stool then you would have the complete transmission assembly out where it could be worked on up on a bench or press if need be.

Edited by Budget Appliance Repair, 03 August 2012 - 06:47 AM.

William Burk (Willie)
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Eureka, CA 95501

#29 Mr. Lee Fix

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 09:31 AM

The bolts all came out without breaking. The one in the picture had loose corrosion lying on top of it. Everything so far is dismantling cleanly and I'll be cleaning and inspecting it all, as anything suspect will be tossed. I'm not doing this for the exercise. I believe in "Do it right or don't do it". I'll read your post several times, map out a plan and proceed. Once everything is out and accounted for I'll order the necessary GENUINE PARTS as I don't want some Chinese Junk sinking my watercraft. The power outage and my non-start generator, no-go furnace (no hot water) and even a little fridge freon leak, all kind of monopolized my time for a few days, but I'll be back on the washer quicker than you can say "LAUNDROMAT TRIP"!! It started to make a different sound several months ago, but when I mentioned it my wife said "I don't hear a difference", but I am far more attuned to these mechanical problems and their concommitant sounds. It's doubtful that any intercession on my part would have staved off this repair, though.

Pulled inner s/s tub out from outer tub in 5 minutes, seperated upper collar, and turned over rest of the assembly. Man does this need need a scrubbing! The milk stool crack has a sibling and one more on the way. What's that proverb, "An ounce of prevention....pound of cure". I should be able to do this now.
http://s1268.photobu...01/New Picture/

I hope I haven't forgotten anything. If so, "I'll Be Back".

Oh yes, Domo Arigato mister Budgeto,

William .

Edited by Mr. Lee Fix, 03 August 2012 - 12:11 PM.


#30 Mr. Lee Fix

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 10:22 PM

Pulled the security bolt, helix, milk stool and 2 brakes. THAT"S RIGHT - 2 BRAKES. i thought that it was supposed to have three. This machine only had the left and right most brake pads installed from the factory. The third unit, closest to counterweight was never installed.

New problem. While it will be a little tough taking off the 1+1/2" nut, especially with the corrosion, directly above the nut is a slightly loose fitting washer that has a smaller diameter than the splined shaft above it. So how does one get it past?
It must be that the 1+1/2" nut loosens what's below and that unit drop off. YES? NO? I'm not getting this part. What's up here as it is so hard to make out what is what especially with the corrosion. I really need to pull this apart and order what's needed. The 3 new pictures show the spot.

http://s1268.photobu...01/New Picture/


I hope someone is reading this!

William

#31 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 10:43 PM

just some info:
Amana (Whirlpool) TopLoad Direct Drive Washer
$ 359 free delivery HomeDepot
$ 288 pickup American TV & Appliances (upper midwest states)
$ 64 area delivery
http://appliantology...d-washer-dryer/
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#32 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 06:57 AM

The brass washer just below the agitator spline can stay in place, (don't loose it, it might be able to come off?).

Should have left the complete wash assembly in the washer and attached when trying to remove the hub but being completely out you maybe able to get a better handle on things?

The plastic piece needs to be removed from the hub, (that is a lint filter - yea right), careful trying to remove it or it will break they hold onto the hub tight.

You have to get the 1 1/2" nut off then pry the plastic lock retainer from the upper transmission housing splines that will be under the nut, then the hub needs to come off before you can do anything about pulling the transmission to get to the upper bearing.

As far as there only being two brake pads, the new replacement brake pad kits come with all three pads and that's all I've every saw in any of these machines. I've never worked on the plastic outer tub style that you have so maybe they cheaped out in the later years and only put two pads in these?

Here's a pretty good picture of the spin basket and hub assembly. Part ref#8 is the nylon lock that has to be pried out of the splines after you get the large nut off.

Posted Image

You may not be able to find a hub and seal kit that has the 3M800 sealant anymore, (the sealant is classified as a hazardous material for shipping so they are removing it from the newer versions of the kit).

RepairClinic wants $51.00 for tube of sealant http://www.repaircli...e/27615P/469080 that comes in most of the older kits.

You machine calls for hub and seal kit part# R9900457 which isn't going to come with the sealant from anywhere. I usually order the old kit number if you can still find it and make sure they aren't go to sub it to the newer kit without the sealant, Part# 495P3 - there is another kit 495P3A that comes without the sealant.

Check your PM's for a message about where you might be able to get the 495P3 with the sealant for a reasonable price.

Edited by Budget Appliance Repair, 04 August 2012 - 07:46 AM.

William Burk (Willie)
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Eureka, CA 95501

#33 jb8103

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 11:26 AM

It's too much work? Since when is it too much work? The machine has worked exceedingly well and now I'm supposed to toss it out? I thought this was a repair forum ...


To a pro tech, a bad bearing means The End for an older machine. It's nature's way of telling us, like my old winter beater car blowing a tranny after 200 thousand + miles. Do I put in a new tranny? No, of course not. Sayonara, chittychittybangbang.

But for knowledge and experience this is a good thing to do. One just can't make any money doing it, not usually.
First, do no harm.

#34 Mr. Lee Fix

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 01:38 PM

I understaand, and thank you for putting it in perspective. As a homeowner and repairman- out- of -necessity though I am compelled to repair. I'm not stupid though and sometimes you just have to punt. Right now I'm dropping back 10 yards and I'm not sure sure if i'm going to call an audible or not. If I do you guys will be the first to know.

William

#35 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 02:16 PM

Whirlpool Direct-Drive Washer
(no longer made, get them before they're gone)
... simpler design Transmission, no Belts, etc
should last a long time
..
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#36 Mr. Lee Fix

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 02:32 PM

One more item: Does anyone have an annotated listing for the parts, in particular the ones in the view posted above and now below?
What is the large diameter item just underneath #8 as mine is a cast metal plate that is completely corroded. I may have to cut off the #8 nut carefully and then buy all new. I'm not using over anything that is suspect or even looks a little bad! It is just under the lint (yeah sure) filter screen and is beginning to explode! :samurai:

William




Posted Image

#37 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 02:37 PM

https://www.maytag.c...- ALW880QAW.pdf
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#38 jb8103

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 05:36 AM

Whirlpool Direct-Drive Washer
(no longer made, get them before they're gone)
... simpler design Transmission, no Belts, etc
should last a long time
..


Very good machines, and eye-poppin' prices. I might buy one myself, just to have it in reserve. Like I wish I'd stocked in some R-22 back when it was $135, but that's a whole different reason to drink lots of beer.
First, do no harm.

#39 Mr. Lee Fix

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 11:05 AM

Ok, Ok. What say the learned Appliance Sensei and Senseless about the SPEED QUEEN AWN542? It looks to be a nice machine and has a decent warranty.....and the verdicts are...?

I haven't thrown in the towel, fight fans, but I'm not sure I want to go these last few rounds. Going to look at the machines recommended earlier in this post by RegUS_PatOff and jb8103. Ilike the Speed Queen though....I just haven't found any forum comments on this particular machine.

William

Edited by Mr. Lee Fix, 05 August 2012 - 11:11 AM.


#40 Scottthewolf

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 06:50 PM

The Speed Queen washer is almost IDENTICAL to the machine you have now, but Speed Queen did not cut corners on the tub bearing, tub seal and the milkstool like your Amana washer. It will probably last at least 10 years without giving you problems, but as with anything you buy today, who knows.

If you do go ahead with repairing your old Amana washer, do NOT replace the plastic lint screen. These lint screens seem to bring all the sand, dirt and grit towards the tub seal and bearing causing premature wear.
Scott Wolf





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