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RedToryTy

GE built-in fridge ZISW42DXA temperature fluctuations

13 posts in this topic

To the Dojo,

This built-in fluctuates in temperature; by that, the low temperature in the freezer goes higher. So, first it'll be five degrees, then ten degrees, then twenty; but, it'll drop back to hard freeze (i.e. 0-5 F). Condenser's clean, compressor's reading "0" lbs. pressure at the service line, defrost timer crackling but cycling. Any relevant experience?

Thanks in advance,

Tyrus

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freezer temp go high for how long ?

it's normal for freezer temps to go high when in defrost

does it stay high long enough to defrost the food ?

how about the evap coil , did you put eyeballs on it , look for proper frost pattern or a big ol ice block at the top

evap fan ? did you check the money making Ge fan blade has not slipped on the shaft and is now rubbing on the mounts and turning slow

Edited by Cactus Bob

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Cactus,

Temp goes high enough to thaw ice cream and ice in bucket. GE evap fan blade working fine (someone in Louisville just cried). I don't know how to get the cover off the evaporator; do you?

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How are

This built-in fluctuates in temperature; by that, the low temperature in the freezer goes higher. So, first it'll be five degrees, then ten degrees, then twenty; but, it'll drop back to hard freeze (i.e. 0-5 F).

How are you collecting these temperature data points? Are you using a temperature data logger or just spot checking? This is an excellent example situation where a temperature data logger can give you a lot more insight into what's happening. For example, can show if it's a regular pattern and, if so, at what intervals which you could then correlate to a particular process in the refrigerator (defrost, compressor run time, etc.) Or if it has no repeating pattern, it may be a door closing issue (user error). These are just examples-- who knows what you'll actually find when you get the actual temperature profile:

Here's the temperature data logger that I use:

http://www.amazon.co...g=mrssamskit-20

and you'll need this software kit to get the data to your Windows PC:

http://www.amazon.co...g=mrssamskit-20

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Domo origato, Samurai!

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Update:

Last Monday, I pulled data from my SUPCO temperature logger, getting wild fluctuations in defrost time: anywhere from a minutes to nearly twenty hours. Replaced my timer, b/c the sealed system works fine (pulling down to five-to-negative ten-range) and the other two defrost components work great. Customer called me yesterday to inform me he had a puddle in the floor. What can be wrong if I've swapped the timer, and the defrost bimetal and element are both good: power surges?

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... he had a puddle in the floor.

clogged Defrost Drain ?

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Last Monday, I pulled data from my SUPCO temperature logger, getting wild fluctuations in defrost time: anywhere from a minutes to nearly twenty hours.

Post the graph so we can look at it, too.

Customer called me yesterday to inform me he had a puddle in the floor.

clogged Defrost Drain ?

Yes.

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Though the drain is clogged, the lady of the house (VERY dissatisfied with being sandbagged with this fridge) helped me come to the conclusion we would all be better off if they bought a new fridge. :-( (because I didn't get to repair the problem).

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Would still like to see that graph... it may indicate a sealed system problem such as a periodic ice plug formation in the capillary tube. Having the graph to help confirm this would have enabled you to get the jump on her conclusion to buy a new refrigerator by making that recommendation yourself and thus retaining your place as the expert appliantologist in her eyes.

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Many apologies, Samurai. I didn't have my flash drive to transfer the graph files from the XP to the Windows7 computer.

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Ain't no thang, we'll catch the next one. :beatnik:

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