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Condensation leaking into furnace and DIY furnace evap replacement


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7 replies to this topic

#1 horn4life

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 11:27 AM

Condensation leaking into furnace part of unit. Can I cut into insulation board surrounding the evap coil to gain access to the coil? Seems like tech did this years ago when unit was serviced and coil cleaned. I am guessing dirty coil is at least part of the problem and there may be debris(?) blocking part of the condensation drain pan causing an overflow at the back of the unit? Any other thoughts on why I might be getting water leaking into the interior of the furnace?

This unit is old and I am guessing it needs to be replaced. the outside unit was replaced 8 or 9 years ago with a Goodman unit off of my homeshield warranty. I need to replace the blower motor as it is overheating and cuts off, slightly smoking after about 13 minutes. Just pulled the blower housing and about to pull the motor and source a replacement. I don't think the interior leaking had anything to do with the motor going out, as it was dirty, but dry.

I am thinking of a DIY replacement over a nice Texas fall weekend in November. How hard can this be? Mechanically it has to be easier than the cylinder head job I just did on my kid's Taurus. Seems like if I 1) match coil to compressor 2) have tech come and recharge freon and check pressures 3) am careful to make sure the installation is clean; it should not be too difficult. I am thinking I need a tech evacuate the freon before removing the old unit and then come out again to charge up the installed unit. Unless there is a way to collect the freon in the compressor? (read something about that somewhere)

Anyhow most important right now is clearing up the condensation leak since I am replacing the motor later today. But I am interested in opinions on DIY install as well.

As always thanks in Advance for any input!
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#2 horn4life

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 11:38 AM

Unit is Rheem 3204-125JD (dinosaur)

Sorry
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#3 jb8103

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 11:56 AM

Can you access the condensate drain tube without cutting into anything? But anyway yeah, you can cut into the insulation if you want. Just use nice foil tape to put it back together.

As for replacing the coil, if you're going to have a tech come out twice and do all that why not just give him the replacement gig too. Won't be that much more.
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#4 Cactus Bob

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 12:07 PM

blow compressed air backwards through the drain line , this will break up the clog and it will flow out

make sure to plug any stand pipes at the indoor coil with tape or a rag before using the compressed air

this will do nothing for dirt on the coil itself but will get the water flowing and stop any further damage to the heater
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#5 horn4life

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 01:14 PM

I tried blowing it out and also attaching a small tube to my shop vac to try and vacuum the crud out. Got out a little gunk but perhaps there is a heavier build up that won't clear. I also wonder if I should double check to make sure the unit is not slightly tilted away from the drain? ALSO It only seems to drip when it is very humid. It leaked a little at the beginning of Summer and the blow out and shop vac method seemed to stop the leaks but when it was very humid I could hear a drip.

COULD a dirty evaporator coil cause excessive condensation during humid times?
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#6 Cactus Bob

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 04:51 PM

COULD a dirty evaporator coil cause excessive condensation during humid times?

no but

if you have an "a" coil the drain is only connected to one side of it , the other side has a drain line or some other way to get the water over to the side with the drain tube
this can be your problem

you also may have a crack in your plastic drain pan or a rust hole in a metal one
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#7 horn4life

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 06:48 PM

I don't know if I have a "A" coil or not yet. Replaced the blower motor and capacitor, to get the place cooled off again. If I have the A type coil then it could be something like a clogged tube that I have been unable to access. Once I open up the coil I will have a better idea about how filthy the thing is. Seems like the last guy might have used Hydracloric Acid, but I am thinking I should opt for something less caustic, with perhaps more elbow grease. I could easily see a rust hole in the pan being the issue as it's probably metal.

anyhow thanks for the input!
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#8 tommytech

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:56 AM

try nu line drain cleaner for your condensate drain line.




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