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Ad-Rock

Bosch SHE43M05UC/48 Dishwasher Shuts Off and Trips Circuit Breaker Mid-Cycle

22 posts in this topic

*** Edit for future reference: PROBLEM SOLVED. ISSUE WAS A BAD CIRCUIT BREAKER CONNECTION IN HOME WIRING PANEL, NOT THE DISHWASHER. THANKS ALL! ***

Hi Guru guys,

I have a Bosch SHE43M05UC/48 dishwasher that was installed in the house I purchased three years ago. It has been working perfectly until recently, when the machine would suddenly shut off mid-cycle and trip the circuit breaker at our breaker box, which is a line dedicated exclusively to the dishwasher.

Originally since there was water in the bottom of the unit, I assumed the drain pump was faulty. Using the excellent information you all have here, I ordered a new drain pump and sucessfully completed replacement of it. Sadly, I discovered that the problem was not resolved, and it appears that both my new and old drain pumps work fine, as water does indeed drain at the beginning of the cycle.

From an electricity standpoint, it certainly seems like tripping the circuit breaker would mean that there is a short-circuit happening somewhere in or around the unit during the cycle. However, I removed the bottom panel and access panel of the dishwasher, checked all the drain lines for blockage, cleaned everything as best I could, but I could not see any leaking water with my naked eye.

I have not gone so far as to remove the Heating Element, and a Google search for another dishwasher that shuts off mid-cycle seemed to suggest that this could be at fault. I am unsure whether a bad Heating Element would cause my circuit breaker to trip, however.

Can you geniuses help me? I have fixed dishwashers in the past and I DON'T want to let this thing beat me!! If I have to order a new appliance I will but I would hate to do that if I can just figure out what is needed to repair this unit, order a part, and replace it.

Thanks much,

Adam

Edited by Ad-Rock

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

My first thoughts on this are the heating element amperage. Remove the toe kick panel and place a clamp on amp meter over the black hot wire. Make sure black incoming is mated with black on the dw. You had it apart already. When the heater comes on you will read about 11.5 amp draw. If the amp draw exceeds this,you have a internal failure. If it does not exceed this you have a bad breaker in the house circuit panel.

Edited by jumptrout
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... it appears that both my new and old drain pumps work fine

... I removed the bottom panel and access panel of the refrigerator

... unsure whether a bad Heating Element would cause my circuit breaker to trip

1) any part ordered from RepairClinic can be returned for a refund (less shipping)

2) blink.png

3) if the broken Heating Element (or wiring) partially shorted to chassis (ground)

I'm not a Bosch master, and I don't know if that's common,

but I believe the Flow-Though Heater is hard to get to

http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/935753

 

Heating-Element-480317-00885663.jpg

(and may have damaged the Controller)

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My first thoughts on this are the heating element amperage. Remove the toe kick panel and place a clamp on amp meter over the black hot wire. Make sure black incoming is mated with black on the dw. You had it apart already. When the heater comes on you will read about 11.5 amp draw. If the amp draw exceeds this,you have a internal failure. If it does not exceed this you have a bad breaker in the house circuit panel.

Going to give this a try with my multimeter -- thanks! Will report back with what I find.

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Going to give this a try with my multimeter -- thanks! Will report back with what I find.

My multimeter is limited to 10 amps, so I'm trying to find a meter capable of taking measurements on full AC line current. Will let you know.

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Do you guys know if the Bosch Heating element part number 264464 (replaced by Part number 263869) is interchangeable with Part number 480317 for my dishwasher?

They sure do look the same on the outside.

Thanks,

Adam

Edited by Ad-Rock

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I think they have different built-in sensors..

why not get the correct one ?

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I am thinking one has the aqua sensor and the other does not. I do know the aqua sensor is not an important part to operation and if it fails you do not know any difference in operation.

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I think they have different built-in sensors..

why not get the correct one ?

Thought I might get a great deal on one, but I think I'll be on the safe side and stick with the recommended OEM part, as you say.

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I too am wondering what the refrigerator has to do with your issue?

If anything in the heater circuit fails you get extended run times and a "1" in the error display.

A broken heater will not trip your circuit,over amping will.

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I too am wondering what the refrigerator has to do with your issue?

If anything in the heater circuit fails you get extended run times and a "1" in the error display.

A broken heater will not trip your circuit,over amping will.

That was a mistype in my original post, and I edited it since, sorry. Meant dishwasher, wrote refrigerator there! :-)

That is interesting what you say about heater circuit. I have no such errors on my display, the breaker simply trips and power is cut midway through the cycle.

Would there be any obvious gaskets, seals or o-rings that could leak and cause a short?

Thanks,

Adam

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Going to give this a try with my multimeter -- thanks! Will report back with what I find.

Your amp draw should be 1.5 until the heater activates.

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Your amp draw should be 1.5 until the heater activates.

Going to get my hands on a beefy Amprobe Clamp Meter tomorrow rated to 400 amps, so I don't blow up my little 10 amp Radio Shack multimeter when the heating element kicks on. Will let you know how it goes.

Cheers,

Adam

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The Fluke 322 is superior and less expensive. More and better user reviews, too.


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I believe the difference between the two flow thru heater units are the connection port to the pump output.

These units have two different style motor mounting systems and the way the pump mates with the heater, I believe.

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Did not mention if the electrical supply connection at the dishwasher was checked. Reference install instructions as these must be done correctly or connection will burn inside the junction box.

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Possibly just a weak/overloaded breaker ?

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My first thoughts on this are the heating element amperage. Remove the toe kick panel and place a clamp on amp meter over the black hot wire. Make sure black incoming is mated with black on the dw. You had it apart already. When the heater comes on you will read about 11.5 amp draw. If the amp draw exceeds this,you have a internal failure. If it does not exceed this you have a bad breaker in the house circuit panel.

OK guys, I finally got my Amprobe meter (got a great deal on a brand new one for $75, which is why I didn't use Fluke). I shut off the dedicated breaker at my breaker box, opened the electrical supply connection on the dishwasher, removed, trimmed and reinstalled each wire (hot, neutral, ground) at the connection panel. Then I clamped my meter over the hot wire, re-engaged the breaker, and fired up a Quick Wash to get the heater engaged.

Meter read about 1 amp until the heater kicked on, at which time it read about 10 amps (from about 9.8 to 10.3 range to my eye). It stayed at 10 amps for about 2 minutes, and then the breaker tripped suddenly. I re-confirmed that there is no water at all in the electrical supply area.

So, perhaps I really do just have a bad breaker? I will go ahead and get it replaced (it's a 20 amp in a fairly new breaker panel) and see if this cures my problems, unless you guys have other suggestions prior to this next step.

Thanks again, all!

-Adam

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Possibly just a weak/overloaded breaker ?

Grand Master kdog called the dance on this one.

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Grand Master kdog called the dance on this one.

Well, partially :-). I have to say that jumptrout's initial advice was spot-on. With the breaker panel off, inspecting the breaker in question revealed that the hot wire was NOT EVEN SCREWED DOWN to the retaining screw. It showed visible signs of scoring due to sparking, and clearly was the culprit. Cut and stripped it to get a fresh contact, screwed it down, and reinstalled with a new 20amp breaker just in case. Panel back in place, fired up the dishwasher, and it ran all the way through with no problem!

So thanks to all of you. You didn't just save me purchasing a new part or even new dishwasher foolishly, you helped me diagnose a home wiring fault that could have caused a fire.

Hats off to all of you, and THANKS AGAIN!!!

Best,

Adam

Edited by Ad-Rock
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Glad your problem has been solved.

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BTW, for future reference. The flow through heater assemblies in Bosch dishwashers rarely fail. It is usually always the heater relay solder joint on the control module that burns up, but this failure hardly ever causes a circuit breaker to blow.

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