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The old Whirlpool belt drive


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15 replies to this topic

#1 jb8103

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 05:57 AM

General question on replacing the belt in this dinosaur. What's the best way to go about it? What to beware of? One book says pull the agitator first (presumably to allow gearcase to drop a half inch or so) another book says nothing about that - both Whirlpool publications.
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#2 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 12:00 PM

Illustrated destructions are printed on the back of the bag the belt comes in. Be careful opening the bag so you don't destroy the destructions!

Belt part link ==> http://www.repaircli...Belt/95405/3480

Here's an enhanced run down on how to replace it:


1) Turn off water. Disconnect electrical supply and water hoses.

2) Remove agitator and cap from machine (this is not always possible as the agitator gets frozen on the shaft, it just makes the job a little easier)

3) Lay machine on it's front. Protect front of the unit from scratches. Do not leave it over night on it's front as some oil will leak out the breather hole on top of the transmission.

4) Remove rear service panel

5) Loosen both nuts holding the motor mounting bracket in the slotted base plate holes.

6) Rotate the motor to the right to relieve the belt tension and remove belt from motor pulley

7) After belt is removed from motor pulley, rotate motor to the left as far as possible to assure cam bar clearance.

8) The spin cam bar must be advanced to the spin position. Push up on the spin control solenoid plunger and rotate the main drive pulley until the cam bar advances to the spin position.

9) Remove the brake yoke spring from the gear case cover and yok.

10) Remove completely the 3 support braces attached to the gear case and base plate.

11) Remove the 2 pump mounting bolts. The pump hoses do not have to be disturbed.

12) Remove the gear case mounting stud which has the spacer. remove spacer. Loosen the remaining 2 gear case mounting studs approximately 7 turns.

13) Remove yoke retainer from yoke support.

14) The gear case can now be pulled down so that the belt can be slipped out between the top of of the clutch shaft and the clutch yoke. and then through the space beneath the short stud; drop the belt from around the gear case.

15) Reverse the procedure in steps 15 & 13 to install the new belt.

16) Replace the pump making certain the pump lever is engaged in the notch in the agitator cam bar before securing the pump to the gear case .

17) Grasp the bottom loop of the yoke spring with a pair of pliers and engage the spring with the hole in the upper gear case cover.

18) Replace spacer in short gear case mounting stud. Tighten the 3 gearcase mounting bolts ( finger tight only ). Next, set the machine upright and tighten the gear case mounting bolts securely. This procedure will allow the superstructure to properly align itself with the center post bearing.

19) Lay the machine on it's front to mount the 3 support braces to the gearcase baseplate. Tighten the bolts securely.

20) To adjust the belt tension properly, position the belt 95405 over the pulleys. Insert a hammer handle or some other lever between the motor mounting brackets. Rotate the motor to the left as far as it will go. Tighten the nuts holding the motor mounting bracket. Check the tension of the belt, it should deflect about 1/2 inch.

21) Set machine upright. Reinstall the agitator, agitator cap, service panel, water hoses and connect electrical supply.

#3 sh2sh2

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 08:14 PM

and the old timers say working on new appliances is a pain

#4 kdog

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 09:21 PM

Ahh but those old workhorses are disguised well enough that your average do-it-yourselfer will be intimidated and keep his hands off. Once you done 1 or 2 there is nuthin tuit.

BTW - In the interest of changing technology, we are no longer known as "Old Timers" but "Old Controllers"
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#5 jb8103

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 10:50 PM

Got it. Filthiest job I ever had.

The main trick is slipping that pin away from the yoke. Don't know why the instructions call it a clutch shaft. It's just one of the pins with a slot in it to guide the cam bar, in this case the spin cam bar.
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#6 certified tech group 51

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 11:00 PM

With an old machine like this , you get to be real intimate with it..........Running your fingers thru the thick and thin parts of the machine, placing your fingers in places that probably have not seen a finger or hand in quit a while :yes: ........And with a new belt , the old girl will give you more years of service............

#7 jb8103

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 06:11 AM

I also got real intimate with the customer's mud covered basement floor and leaky plumbing.
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#8 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:15 AM

I also got real intimate with the customer's mud covered basement floor and leaky plumbing.


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#9 Skiter29

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 09:37 AM

i would call us old PROS

#10 fairbank56

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 10:40 AM

Don't know why the instructions call it a clutch shaft. It's just one of the pins with a slot in it to guide the cam bar, in this case the spin cam bar.


The cam bar lets the clutch shaft down or forces it up thus engaging/disengaging the clutch. This action of the clutch shaft also operates the brake mechanism.

Eric

#11 nickfixit

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 09:22 AM

Well done jb! Plenty of DIY types have screwed up that job, some doing serious damage. Loosing the ball from the T-Bearing, not getting the belt into the motor pulley, flipping cam bars out of the hold-down. breaking wires to the wig-wag and motor, and ruining the motor by over-tightening the belt.

Many guys will just give up, and their wives will call a pro to salvage the machine.

Try the same job on a portable washer, a real pain because you see so few of them.

Edited by nickfixit, 25 November 2012 - 09:26 AM.

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#12 Skiter29

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 02:37 PM

Dont forget they forget to put back those 2 washers back on the pin so when the machine starts to agitage it would also spin had to go on many of those

#13 Scottthewolf

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 03:02 PM

I once had a customer cut the new belt and staple it back together to get it around the gearcase post.

Edited by Scottthewolf, 25 November 2012 - 03:02 PM.

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#14 jb8103

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 09:37 PM

Those two washers threw me for a minute. They look like nuts but they ain't.

The cam bar lets the clutch shaft down or forces it up thus engaging/disengaging the clutch. This action of the clutch shaft also operates the brake mechanism.

Eric


Embarrassing. I never saw that. Back to the book. I don't care if I never see another one I still want to understand this thing.
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#15 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 09:55 PM

http://appliantology...ourse-787771-3/
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#16 fairbank56

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 10:14 PM

Older belt drives had a clutch shaft that was threaded at the top for a nut that was used for the clutch adjustment while newer ones just used washers over the top of the shaft which was smaller diameter at the top to hold the washers.

Eric




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