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100lb Propane Tank Installation


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3 replies to this topic

#1 Boagie

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 03:16 PM

Looking to install a wall type propane gas heater - What is the proper placement of the propane tank outside the house? Is there a certain distance it needs to be away from house, structure, window, electrical connections, etc.

Want to do the install myself. I fix appliances all day long, but this is a little different from what I am used to, so any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks!
Rodge

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#2 jumptrout

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 03:19 PM

LP tanks up to 150lbs can be installed next to the structure.
I should add that is in my code zone.
Some zones require a 10 foot relief..

Edited by jumptrout, 16 November 2012 - 03:24 PM.


#3 telefunkenu47

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 01:27 AM

You can pick up a REGO book at your local heating supply hse. Refer to nfpa 54, also, look at the mfrs instructions, there is a wealth of info there usually. Be advised that the average demand wall heater of 130kbtu needs a 3/4 in supply. Why not pay a few sheckels and have a pro help you out. Go modern, Go gas, Go boom!!!!!Surely you have a buddy or two down at the gas company.


Even root canal is easy...if you're a dentist...

#4 Cactus Bob

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 11:51 AM

make sure your insured for propane

 

as a contractor i no longer work on propane appliances , the insurance rider for propane was way to much money , so i dropped it

 

at home , make sure your homeowners insurance knows you are using propane for heat , portable heaters are ok , but attached heaters like a wall heater your insurance carrier needs to know about


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