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Richmond Water Heater Not Heating Properly

Water Heater Richmond heating element

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2 replies to this topic

#1 dtarlo

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 01:39 AM

I have a 30 Gallon Richmond Water Heater, Model Number 8MV30-2, Upper and lower wattage listed at 4500/3380 each.

It was typically enough water to provide two showers before it ran out. About 3 months ago (yes I have been lazy in dealing with the issue) it started only giving enough water for about one shower.

I eyeballed the top and bottom element from the outside and neither has the appearance of being burned out. To "rectify" the situation, I cranked up the heat, it works, kinda.

I live in an apartment building where the maintenance guy has equal or less skill with this than I do, and the landlady is quite cheap, so replacing it would be like pulling teeth with no anathestic.

Can anyone give me pointers on how to test each of the elements?

I plan to turn off the power next week and drain it, I figure it would be a good time to pull each of the elements to inspect and test them.

Thanks in advance for any help!

D

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#2 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 02:02 AM

no need to pull the Elements to test them.
just disconnect them and use an OHM meter
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#3 skintdigit

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:57 AM

Sounds like a toasted element. Like RegUS says, just shut off the power, disconnect one wire from each element and check resistance across the two terminals of each element. You can check for resistance from terminals to the tank(ground) if you wish, but a fried element will show up as "open" (infinite resistance).

 

You're paying rent, though. Call the apt. manager and ask them to get your water heater working...it's nearly December, man!

 

SD







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