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Sears 110.28892790 Washer Not Spinning - Jackhammer Sound


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31 replies to this topic

#21 fairbank56

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 04:32 AM

http://www.repaircli...8546462/1180081



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#22 obenourb

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 06:45 AM

I can't tell from the pictures or the diagram what actually holds this T-bushing on to the shaft.  Is it easy to get the old bushing off and the new one on or should I just buy the whole assembly?  Be nice to save some $ if i don't need to spend them.

 

Also - from the pictures there doesn't seem to be an actual groove where the retaining clip slides in.  The pictures would suggest the clip goes in behind the "T".  Have I got this correct?


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#23 fairbank56

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 08:56 PM

  The bushing is pressed into the drive tube. The outer diameter of the drive tube is the same as the diameter of the bottom of the bushing. When the bushing is pressed into the tube, the small shoulder at the bottom of the bushing "creates" the groove. Don't know how difficult it is, never done one but would try if needed, for the small cost of a bushing.

 

Eric



#24 obenourb

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 09:20 PM

Thanks.  I got the old bushing out with a hack saw blade pretty easy since it looks like it is made of copper and was easy to saw.  New one in the mail.  Looks like I may get out of this mess for under $35.  Compared brake pads with new ones, no significant difference, the new ones I bought are going back.

 

Thanks to all who helped, I think I am on the road to clean clothes once again.


Brent

#25 kdog

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 09:23 PM

Bushing is made of sintered Bronze (Olilite) - please post a link where you got the bearing from and take some pics of your journey to post for us.


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#26 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 05:16 AM

Bushing is made of sintered Bronze (Olilite) - please post a link where you got the bearing from 

 
 

http://www.repaircli...8546462/1180081

 

...and take some pics of your journey to post for us.


Extra credit for pictures or video!   :dazzler:



#27 kdog

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 10:57 PM


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#28 Scottthewolf

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 11:16 PM

In 20 years of doing appliance repair, I have never replaced a basket drive in a Whirlpool direct drive top load washer.  I have replaced a few gearcases and clutches, but never a basket drive.  I guess I'm lucky.


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#29 kdog

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 11:21 PM

Have done many, some complete rebuilds due to water leak through centrebearings - piece o'cake though - just add this:

http://www.repaircli...er=110.28892790

 

 

Tub-Base-280184-01032550.jpg


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#30 obenourb

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 08:05 AM

The fix was pretty simple once I got the new T-bushing (8546462) and clip ring (W10083200).  I would not have known these part numbers without this forum as they are not usually shown separately in diagrams or the normal parts offered for this model.

 

Getting the old one out required pulling the motor and transmission to get access.  I then took a hacksaw blade, wrapped up one end so it would saw the old bearing and not my hand, and inserted the other end inside the spin tube shaft hole.  This allowed me to saw through the wall of the old T-bearing in two locations (see the picture) and it finally came loose.  I just stuck my finger in the hole and pulled it out.  You have to watch actually sawing into the steel shaft but even if you knick it up some it doesn't matter since the replacement T-bearing will cover them all up.

 

I then put the new T-bearing in place by tapping it in with a hammer to wood to bearing approach so as not to mar it.  It went in pretty easy, put the cam driver and clip on and reattached the motor.  Ten minute job once I got the parts.

I think the bearing got ruined by me improperly putting the spin tube thrust washer on when I did a clutch replacement a year or so ago.  I suspect this T-bearing would normally last a good long time and would never see the kind of wear this one did without some sort of pilot error being the root cause.

 

My quality of life is now restored........

 



Brent

#31 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 09:15 AM

Nice work, obenourb, and domo for sharing the pearls for your repair odyssey!  eb672b4e42.gif



#32 kdog

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 02:28 AM

Very nicely done !   That seemed to me to be a fairly common wearpoint on those


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